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Callaway redesigns Odyssey R-Ball Prototype using GE’s additive manufacturing

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Callaway has announced the company has signed a consultancy agreement with GE Additive’s AddWorks team, with the aim of improving its equipment through the potential of additive manufacturing. According to GE Additive’s website, additive manufacturing is a process that creates a physical object from digital design, enabling the creation of lighter, stronger parts and systems.

What does this mean for Callaway’s equipment?

The opening project from the agreement is a redesigned Odyssey R-Ball Prototype putter head. Callaway originally developed the Odyssey R-Ball Prototype as a tour preferred model in Japan, which consisted of removing the front ball from the original 2-ball design. Callaway, through additive manufacturing, has optimized the acoustics of the putter while retaining the preferred shape and performance.

 

Brad Rice, director – R&D, Advanced Engineering at Callaway, speaking about the process, stressed that the use of additive manufacturing is the future to the production of equipment in the game of golf, stating

“Additive manufacturing is a new tool; which is quickly going beyond the aspirational phase, and into the functionalization phase of the technology. Callaway needs to learn how to use this tool well because it is inevitable that 3D-Printing of production parts is going to happen – it is the production method of the future.”

So just how has Callaway and GE Additive collaborated to create the ideal acoustics on the Odyssey R-Ball Prototype putter head? Well, the answer is by adding geometry that made it difficult for conventional casting methods, which you can get a feel for in this short video.

For the Odyssey Prototype putter to retain its optimal design and shape while altering the acoustic signature of the putter head, Callaway and GE Additive’s AddWorks’ design and engineering teams implemented additive manufacturing through the following process:

  •  AddWorks provided guidance to Callaway, based on decades of additive design background spanning several industries.
  •  The team refined existing designs to the build direction to ensure all features were self-supported or easily supported during the build. The AddWorks team designed supports for thermal stresses and overhang constraints.
  •  Topology optimization was used in conjunction with acoustical mapping to create the optimal design.

According to GE Additive AddWorks general manager, Chris Schuppe, additive manufacturing is a method which we are going to be hearing of a lot down the line, and he is expecting this to be the first of many collaborations with Callaway

“We’re taking away many new learnings from our first project together, especially around aesthetics. We have also used additive technology to create an acoustic map, which is certainly a first for us. We’re looking forward to driving more successful projects with Callaway, as they continue their additive journey.”

What the future holds for Callaway’s products through the use of additive manufacturing remains to be seen. However, the company’s bold stance on the potential of the process enhancing their equipment could be telling.

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Gianni is a freelance writer. He holds a Bachelor of Arts as well as a Diploma in Sports Journalism. He can be contacted at gmagliocco@outlook.com. Follow him on Twitter @giancarlomag

16 Comments

16 Comments

  1. aga

    Nov 18, 2018 at 7:41 pm

    Can’t wait to get my hands on one of those tour tested R-Ball prototype putters… and price is no deterrent !!!!

  2. Tom

    Nov 17, 2018 at 11:53 pm

    Equipment manufacturers have run out of new product ideas….now just blowing smoke and mirrors…..sellers be sellin!

    • gunmetal

      Dec 5, 2018 at 2:00 pm

      Yep.

      Callaway is King of this. Boeing, Lamborghini, now GE. They partner with companies that can add credibility to their marketing story.

  3. engineer bob

    Nov 17, 2018 at 1:05 am

    GE will attempt to “engineer out” the unnecessary material and make it ring like a bell… how low can you go using high tech capability?!! Pa thetic US technology usage.

    • Engineer Swede

      Nov 20, 2018 at 8:35 am

      EBM or Electronic Beam Manufacturing is for the most part a bought up technology from a Swedish company called Arcam, that is now a part of GE. It’s actually fun to see 3D-printing technologies getting a wider audience. Rapid prototyping might soon become rapid(and local) production! Now wouldn’t that be a thing Bob? Where all you’re golfclubs is not produced in Taiwan but in the neighbouring town? Supporting local business and less shipping?

  4. JP

    Nov 16, 2018 at 10:28 pm

    Has anyone ever complained about the sound the putter makes? If the sound sucks, the design probably sucks. Start over.

    • ogo

      Nov 17, 2018 at 1:07 am

      Geerhead duffers want a good sounding putter because that’s all they look forward to… a ding sound…!

  5. Tiger Noods

    Nov 16, 2018 at 7:30 pm

    So, the short story is they couldn’t figure out how to do this in-house, called a contractor, and they’re spinning it as competence.

    Nice story, bros.

    Maybe they will start making clubs that don’t have high failure rates. That’d be nice.

    • Jamie

      Nov 16, 2018 at 10:24 pm

      That’s called patent infringement, libtard. You don’t just get to take another’s ideas and processes and make them your own.

      • Libtard

        Nov 18, 2018 at 3:44 am

        First, Libtard? Grow up.

        Second, patent infringement? I’m guessing that your use of “libtard” probably precludes a college degree, so maybe, just maybe, leave the litigation to those qualified.

        Third, you clearly weren’t replying to the above, so I suggest you brush up on your interwebbing, Señor AOL…

        Finally, I don’t get the American fascination with insults and someone’s political views. I thought America was “land of the free” and such… you really are an intolerant bunch.

  6. Hogenben

    Nov 16, 2018 at 5:25 pm

    All they are doing is working on acoustics…..just bs marketing hype.

  7. bj

    Nov 16, 2018 at 2:46 pm

    Callaway AND many other manufacturers of ALL kinds of products should have ALREADY been using 3D printing!!! The EXTREME amount of savings in designing ANY proto type is and the ability refine their products is very flexible AND inexpensive!!
    Its about time, they are FAR behind in using this tech that is HAS BEEN WELL PROVEN!!

    • ac

      Nov 16, 2018 at 5:34 pm

      whats the deal with the random all caps? is it code? AND ALL ALREADY EXTREME ANY AND FAR HAS BEEN WELL PROVEN..guess not.

  8. DB

    Nov 16, 2018 at 1:57 pm

    Cool story. I do think additive, 3-D, multi-material, etc. will be the future for some golf clubs. Article would have been better if Callaway had released some pictures of the final product or some information about how they can actually apply this to a product.

  9. Jamie

    Nov 16, 2018 at 1:52 pm

    GE will be bankrupt in a few weeks. Callaway would be smart to buy this unit now.

    • Benny

      Nov 18, 2018 at 6:20 pm

      I certainly hope not. Would love to put a wager on this. Now is a great time to buy!

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Honma T World 747 Rose Proto MB irons are coming to retail

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When Justin Rose signed with Honma in at the beginning of January, speculation ensued as to which irons the Englishman would play. Quickly, we learned Rose would game T World 747 Rose Proto MB irons — and he took to the clubs quickly, winning the Famers Insurance Open later that month.

So, clearly, the S20C mild steel irons work for Rose, as they’ve been in his bag since that point, but will they work for the general consumer? Up until this point, we’ve been unable to answer that question, as the irons were tour only. With today’s news, however, we now know Rose Proto irons are coming to retail.

According to the company, the irons, which are forged at Honma HQ in Sakata, Japan, are the result of several months of testing and modification in conjunction with Rose.

The world No. 2 had this say: “The idea of having a hand in the collaborative design process for my set of clubs was extremely exciting. Working with the Honma master craftsmen to create an iron that felt and looked great for me was one of the biggest thrills of my career.”

The irons feature varying CG throughout the set to achieve Rose’s preferred trajectories and a combination satin front and mirror back finish, as well as blended muscleback design.

Full specs below.

Rose Proto MB irons will sell for $175 USD per club and will come in a 4-10 iron set configuration. The company will also offer a 3-iron separately.

 

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Spotted: Dustin Johnson with new Fujikura Ventus prototype at the Masters, RBC Heritage

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Beyond the obvious big news of some guy named Mr. Woods winning his fifth green jacket this past weekend, there were some pretty interesting developments with another player that runs on a first name basis or at least initials: DJ switched drivers MID tournament and had a new Fujikura Ventus prototype shaft to go along with his new TaylorMade M6 as he took on Augusta National Saturday and Sunday.

We don’t have all the details yet, but from what we have heard so far this new Prototype Black Ventus is an even lower launching version of the blue Ventus currently available. If history is correct, and we are looking at a line extension, then the colors tell a lot of the story. The Atmos line features both a blue and black version with a final higher-launching red version to round out the series in what Fuji calls their color-coded launch system to make fitting and product recognition just that much easier.

Photos of the “black” prototype via Fujikura.

It’s not unusual for shaft companies like Fujikura to bring out prototype profiles utilizing technologies from their newest lines to try and get them into the bags of more players. Fuji’s newest technology is VeloCore, and we have already seen it adopted at a high rate. Here is some more info from Fujikura to explain the technology

“VeloCore is a multi-material core comprised of ultra-high modulus Pitch 70 Ton Carbon Fiber (about 150% stronger and more stable than T1100g) and 40 Ton bias layers that are the full length of the shaft for incredible stability. VeloCore Technology promotes consistent center-face impact and provides ultimate stability, tightening dispersion and increasing control. The result is a shaft that maximizes the MOI (moment of inertia) and ball speed of your clubhead through the reduction of twist during the swing and at impact, especially on off-center hits.”

This makes sense, considering any contact made beyond an absolutely perfect (almost impossible from a physics standpoint) strike in line with the COG of a driver head traveling at 120 mph will result in twisting at impact — MOI is maximized in driver heads to increase stability along with spin with Ventus and VelocCore, Fujikura thanks to their Enzo system, is better understanding how that relationship works with the shaft to produce new and better products.

Anyway, since we know DJ deviated from his traditional Fujikura Speeder Evolution II Tour Spec driver shaft for his weekend rounds this past weekend, we can expect to see it again this week at the RBC Heritage this week at Hilton Head, and we’ll have our eyes peeled to see where else this shaft pops up on tour.

Johnson teeing off during Wednesday’s RBC Heritage Pro-Am.

 

 

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WRX Spotlight: Bridgestone e12 Speed and e12 Soft golf balls

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Product: Bridgestone e12 Speed and e12 Soft golf balls

The Pitch

Per Bridgestone: “Speed: 3-piece surlyn golf ball that delivers sidespin reducing performance, with explosive distance off the tee with a solid feel. 105 MPH and up swing speeds. Soft: 3-piece surlyn golf ball that delivers sidespin reducing performance, with added distance off the tee with a softer feel. 105MPH and lower swing speeds.”

Who is it for?

The pitch seems simple enough…. Bridgestone, who has emerged as a competitor year in and year out in the golf ball market, gives us the “e class” product that will suit the golfers from 10-handicap and up.

What’s in it?

The key words here are Active Acceleration Mantle…both the Soft and the Speed have it, but AAM will deliver in different ways on each. In the Speed ball, the AAM allows Bridgestone to firm up the core giving your higher speed player optimal launch conditions, tight dispersions, and enough feel around the greens to satisfy.

For the Soft ball, the AAM allows Bridgestone to soften the core up a bit giving your lower speed players a helping hand off the driver and ultimate touch around the greens where that player profile needs it the most.

Director of Content Johnny Wunder on the Bridgestone e12 Speed and Soft

As a player who has been in the same ball for almost 20 years (Pro V1X), my open-mindedness to trying something outside of that category has been nil. But after having a great convo with Elliot Mellow (Bridgestone Golf Ball Sales Manger), I became curious about their take on a ball for players like my buddy Dave (high speed/high handicap) or even my father (low spin/low speed/mid handicap).

Bridgestone e12 Soft

My big take away is…this is a FUN golfball. Fun in the fact that both models do and feel as they are advertised. The Soft is spinny off the driver and forgiving around the greens. How that translates to your higher handicapper is around the greens when you don’t clip it just right off of a wedge, the ball doesn’t take off on you. The first hop is straight up not straight forward. You can see where I’m going there. Off the big stick, it translates into being able to carry a hazard, bunker, etc without sacrificing control due to lack of spin. Your distance gains come from elevation and height, not necessarily raw yardage distance.

The Speed is well…fast. It’s hot, holds its line in the wind and rolls out when it hits the ground. Around the greens, it’s serviceable for a higher handicap. It’s not a players ball around the greens, in my opinion. The feel off the face doesn’t match up. However, I’m guessing if you took blind feel out of it and put all these on a Trackman, the Speed ball would still hold water around the greens.

Bridgestone e12 Speed

At $29.99/dozen, if you like experimenting with a new nugget here and there, try this one. It’s fun and the company fulfills the promises made on the box. Can you really ask for much more?

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