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An interview with State Apparel’s founder Jason Yip

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For the past five years, Jason Yip has been building an apparel company that redefines the purpose of golf wear. With a strong background in innovation from his days in Silicone Valley, Yip wanted to reinvent golf apparel to be a functional tool for the golfer.

The other day, I had the pleasure of talking with Mr. Jason Yip about State Apparel and a little about himself. It is not every day that you get to speak with someone who can exude passion through the phone. On this day, though, I could hear the passion Jason has for golf, California, and for State Apparel.

Yip said State Apparel has two major foundations

  1. Functional innovation
  2. Social responsibility

Jason loved talking about watching Tiger Woods. However, he watched for something I believe few ever have. How was Tiger wiping the dew and the grass off his clubs, hands, and ball? The answer that Jason observed was that Tiger and others are utilizing their clothing as wiping surfaces. The core of State Apparel is the functionally located wiping elements on your article of clothing. The staple of the brand is their Competition Pants which have wiping elements located on the cuffs, side pockets, and rear pockets.

State Apparel recognizes the need to be socially responsible as a company. This seems to be from Jason’s earlier days of playing golf behind a truck stop in Central Valley, California.

How is the State Apparel socially responsible? Yip identified three ways.

  • Production is done in San Francisco.
  • Most of their apparel utilizes sustainable fabric.
  • Proud supporter of the San Francisco Public Golf Alliance.

Jason’s desire is to provide not only apparel that is golf specific but also the experience that we have on the golf course. A little over a year ago the State Apparel Store and Urban Clubhouse opened on Filmore Street in San Francisco, California.

“I wanted to provide the golfing experience closer to the home of many golfers in the area,” Yip told me.

Among the State Apparel clothing at the store, there is an indoor hitting by with launch monitor. And they have even hosted speaking events with local professionals and architects at the clubhouse.

At the end of our conversation I asked Jason, what would he say to someone who knows nothing about State Apparel, especially those of us not in California?

His answer

“State Apparel is a unique authentic brand that is designed specifically for golfers by a golfer. Look at the product because it is something you have never seen and absolutely communicate on what you see or what you have questions about.”

 

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Known as a golf junkie among his friends and family, Bryan Montgomery's passion for this game started at a young age which has blossomed into what is now a 10 year career in the golf industry. Part of the second class to graduate from Eastern Kentucky Universities PGA Golf Management program he has since worked as an assistant golf professional, customer service manager, director of club fitting and merchandise sales, and fitting specialist for Mizuno. Recently he started his own brand, Form Golf which currently focuses on the style and equipment in the golf industry. As a writer for GolfWRX Bryan's primary focus is on style in the golf industry and helping the readers become the best looking member among their group of friends. Please feel free to reach out to Bryan through Twitter or Instagram. Enjoy!

6 Comments

6 Comments

  1. Moweejim

    Dec 10, 2018 at 12:53 pm

    Has his heart in the right place but very few golfers, clean their clubheads on their pants, unless your a pro whose provided all his clothing. Not a necessary asset for line of golf pants.

  2. Tony Lynam

    Dec 10, 2018 at 8:16 am

    Why does everything have to be about social justice? Oh, wait, this dude is based in San Francisco? No wonder.

  3. Jo Zoggs

    Dec 9, 2018 at 3:29 pm

    Jason YIP – LOL, better than Frank Shank I suppose

  4. Gunter Eisenberg

    Dec 8, 2018 at 9:14 am

    Socially responsible clothing??!? I couldn’t care less if it was made by Peruvian tribesmen living in the Rainforest singing kumbaya. I want clothing that is reasonably stylish, quality clothing at a reasonable price. The Ben Hogan brand fits the bill for me.

    Available exclusively at Walmart.

    • geohogan

      Dec 9, 2018 at 11:53 am

      Thankfully, due to tariffs, we will soon have golf clothing for Americans , made in America.

    • Evan

      Dec 9, 2018 at 11:14 pm

      Cool story bro.

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Podcasts

Gear Dive: Inside Wunder’s brain with Dr. Josh Brant

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In this episode of TGD, Johnny chats with sports psychologist Josh Brant of the Golf Performance Center on the madness that is JW’s mind and how unpacking that can help all golfers.

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Opinion & Analysis

Bryson DeChambeau, the oh so human ‘Golfing Machine’

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The golf world has fired up its Bryson DeChambeau talk to a new decibel since his win at the 2020 US Open at Winged Foot Golf Club in Mamaroneck, New York. Much of the banter centers around the idea that the young Californian is “revolutionizing the game” by playing it in a way that hasn’t been seen before. The proposition couches the question of whether his style of play will influence and change the way other Tour pros and top-level amateurs and college golfers will play the game as well.

First let’s define the phrase ’bomb and gouge,” that has inserted itself rather quickly into golf’s present-day vocabulary and has come to characterize Bryson’s game. Bomb and gouge refers to the strategy of hitting the golf ball as far as one can then if it happens to land in the rough gouging it out with a short iron onto the green. But did we really see anyone other than DeChambeau this past week purposely play Winged Foot this way? Certainly not.

Nor with all of this talk about how Bryson’s style will change the game (and despite Bryson in interview after interview himself encouraging all golfers to “swing their swing” and play golf their own way) are we really hearing a chorus of Tour pros singing out about how much they want to be individuals yet who want to play golf just as Bryson DeChambeau does? Absurd, right?

In fact, Bryson’s uniqueness as far as swing technique goes has everything to do with Homer Kelley’s book ‘The Golfing Machine’, which Bryson’s teacher Mike Schy gave to him when DeChambeau was just a teenager. That book views the swing as comprised of a blend of 24 components parts, with each component possessing between 3 and 15 variations. Cross multiply and combine the components and their variations and the number of possible ways to swing the club has so many zeros after its “l” that it takes someone with a degree in advanced mathematics to know this number’s name.

Yet all Bryson has done and all any golfer needs to do is to assemble a swing with one variation from the list of 24 components. If this still sounds a bit complicated, you wouldn’t be wrong to think it, but perhaps the most unique way in which DeChambeau has earned his non-conformist status and badge is the manner and degree in which he has embraced and enjoyed the game’s complexity and difficulty. There’s very little just “grip and rip it” going on under that Ben Hogan cap of his. Or, as Homer Kelley in The Golfing Machine puts it:

“Treating a complex subject or action as though it were simple, multiplies its complexity because of the difficulty in systematizing missing and unknown factors or elements. Demanding that golf instruction be kept simple does not make it simple-only incomplete and ineffective. Unless this is recognized, golf remains a vague, frustrating, infuriating form of exertion.”

Some also say he’s revolutionizing the game because he’s trying to hit the ball as far as he can. Let’s set aside for a second the fact the Bryson isn’t even in the top ten on the list of the Tour’s Driving Distance leaders. What is revolutionary about him is that he has succeeded in adding distance to his drives while taking strokes off of his scores, whereas many other Tour pros throughout the game’s modern history at least found their scores rising right along with their newly gained driving distance numbers.

DeChambeau, with another assist from The Golfing Machine, also stands out in the manner in which he has freed himself from the “Mechanical vs the Feel Player” duality trap, even as many people describe him almost by rote as a “mad scientist” with a robotic swing and game calculated on nothing but the impact numbers read off of a launch monitor.

The mantra “Mechanics produce and feel reproduces” is one central to Homer Kelley’s philosophy in The Golfing Machine, and it’s a one-two punch DeChambeau both strives to achieve and often discusses during his press interviews and in interview after interview.

Therefore, with all of the talk about his single length set of irons, (Bobby Jones used one too), his physical bulking up (Johnny Miller, Tiger, even Anika Sorenstam added significant muscle to their frames), his diet and workout routines (Gary Player was ahead of him by 70 years in this regard!), the one thing rarely discussed about Bryson DeChambeau is just how central to his career remains the book The Golfing Machine.

While the book has often garnered vicious criticism over the years, with proponents of its pages criticized by some unsparingly, to put it mildly, Bryson DeChambeau has put an oh so human face onto this work of genius by Homer Kelley. Just look at the young man’s smile of joy as he hoisted the 2020 U.S. Open trophy!

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On Spec

On Spec: Titleist CNCPT irons, Costco wedges, fitter FAQ, and finding “YOUR” best value

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This episode covers the retail release of the Costco Kirkland signature wedges, the announcement of the new Titleist CNCPT series irons, and how although very different, both offer value to the golfer that will buy them.

The second half of the show gets into answering popular questions on club building and fitting from host’s Ryan Barath weekly Q&A on Instagram.

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