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Using the “MySwing balance plates,” we see the difference of how the Center of Gravity (CG) moves when you are on one leg, in a standard set up, or in a hybrid setup between the two. This is referred to as a diagonal stance or closed stance, and it’s gaining quite a bit of popularity on Tour with players such as Matt Kuchar and Graeme McDowell. The findings were very interesting!

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Shawn Clement is the Director of the Richmond Hill Golf Learning Centre and a class A PGA teaching professional. Shawn Clement was a 2011 and 2015 Ontario PGA Teacher of the Year nominee and was also voted in the top 10 (tied with Martin Hall at No. 9) as most sought after teacher on the internet with 65 K subscribers on YouTube and 29 millions hits.

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7 Comments

  1. geohogan

    Sep 7, 2018 at 11:57 am

    Shawn hits the ball as well and as far with one leg, proving that power does not originate in the legs. Thank you Shawn.

    • ogo

      Sep 9, 2018 at 12:16 am

      Then how do Ground Forces provide the extra power if not through the legs?
      One leg = Low power…. Two legs = Max power…. plain & simple.

      • geohogan

        Sep 11, 2018 at 11:33 pm

        Ground forces dont create power, they allow the power of the upper body to be transmitted to the clubhead, by providing balance and stability for the upper body…newtons third law.

        The lower body, including the legs provide the equal and opposite reaction force.

  2. geohogan

    Sep 6, 2018 at 5:52 pm

    We pivot on our right hip in the BS and finish the pivot on the left hip.
    Pivot on our hip joints is only possible when our hips are supported by our legs.

    If pivot is greater with longer clubs, then doesnt it make sense that the leg position should be such that the right hip is well supported when pivot is deeper?

    Of course a closed stance(trail foot further back from target line) places our trail leg in a position to support the larger , deeper pivot on the right hip.

    There is no mystery, no secret, just common sense.
    Ref. ” The Hogan Manual of Human Performance: GOLF, 1992

    • ogo

      Sep 7, 2018 at 8:30 pm

      But what happens within the hips when you are transitioning from the right trail hip to the lead left hip… that split second when neither hip is fully loaded? 😮

    • ogo

      Sep 7, 2018 at 8:32 pm

      1992? … Surely load plate data and 3D video has obsoleted much of what Hogan (Aussie?) has written?!!

      • geohogan

        Sep 12, 2018 at 1:13 pm

        OGO

        Are you saying that when torso turns in the BS, the trail hip is not supported by the legs?

        That is the statement written in 1992. How to do it and why. That has not changed.

        Tell us something in the book that IS obsolete…. please. Time and technology doesnt change FACTS.

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Instruction

WATCH: Gain 20 yards with this hip action

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The lower body is the engine of the golf swing! In this video I show you a key move for (a lot) more distance.

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WATCH: How to master the downhill lie

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Top-100 instructor Tom Stickney explains the adjustments your need to make to consistently send the golf ball toward your target from a downhill lie. Enjoy the video below.

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Stickney: How to practice like you play

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As I have written in previous articles, there are two different types of practice you can do when you go to the range. One is hyper-focused on swing mechanics. And the other is focused on working on things you will find yourself having to do on the golf course in order to score.

These are the things I focus on when working on my swing, because my misses are mainly slight pulls like this one below from time to time:

These factors are the ones I find most helpful when working on MY swing fundamentals.  Your misses and your swing focus may be totally different and that is OK. Remember, it’s here that we are ONLY working on your golf swing.

When I feel like my mechanics are under control, I tend to go to the range to focus on hitting shots — you know, the ones I must use on the golf course every time I play.  This is the key to scoring…hitting shots! Not working on my mechanics.  These types of practice times help me to learn how to PLAY golf.

When I do this I usually focus on a few areas to fine tune my “feels” so I can be a shotmaker:

I start by hitting a shot at partial speed and then trying to hit each successive ball just past the last one.  This helps me to gain better yardage control, and therefore I seldom have in-between yardages I can’t handle.

Next I work on altering the height I hit the ball.  I begin low and work my way to as high as I can hit the ball.  As we know, the ball’s landing angle helps to stop the ball quicker on the firm greens we have during the summer and during tournaments.  It is this drill that helps me find those hard to reach pins tucked behind bunkers. This type of practice helps my trajectory control.

As a player who moves the ball from left to right 90 percent of the time, it is important for me to also work on curving the ball the opposite way because sometimes I will have to do so on the course.  Working on curing the ball the opposite way keeps your swing sharp and helps if you are tending to move the ball too much in the other direction. This drill helps me to feel the opposite curvature than what is normal in my world.

Now comes the fun drill hitting the ball both directions and curving the ball as much as I possibly can and still find the target.  Here I am exaggerating curving the ball so I can get myself out of trouble on the course or find a pin that is tucked way right or left on the green.  This drill helps me to fine tune my ball control.

As you can see, these are fun type of drills that have great advantages to players on the course.  Not every shot is your stock shot and not every day plays the same. If you don’t work on hitting shots then you are only working on half your game at best!

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