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Mizuno launches new JPX919 Tour, Hot Metal and Forged irons

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We knew Mizuno’s new JPX919 irons were coming soon when they popped up on the USGA Conforming Clubs list and GolfWRX Members were going crazy back in July. Our Two Guys Talking Golf podcast proceeded to dissect every millimeter of the photos. Then recently, Mizuno promised JPX919 irons on August 29 in a cryptic Tweet.

Now, all of the speculation is over. Mizuno has officially announced its new line of JPX919 clubs. The family consists of JPX919 Tour irons — the successors to the popular JPX-900 Tour irons that Brooks Koepka has now won three major with — JPX919 Forged irons, and JPX919 Hot Metal irons. The irons are now available through the Mizuno Performance Fitting System.

Each of the irons are designed with different metals and for different golfers. We have all of the information for you highlighted below, including photos of each of the irons.

In addition, we welcomed Chris Voshall, Mizuno’s Senior Club Engineer, back onto our Gear Dive podcast to get into the new JPX919 line. Listen to the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes!

See more photos of the Mizuno JPX919 irons in our forums.

JPX919 Tour irons

Mizuno’s JPX-900 Tour irons were initially designed with Brooks Koepka in mind, which is funny, because he’s now won three majors with those irons in the bag (2017 and 2018 U.S. Open, and 2018 PGA Championship). If you’re interested in hearing that full story, Voshall told it in-depth on our Gear Dive podcast.

The JPX919 Tour irons are the successors to those irons. They’re also Grain-Flow Forged from 1025E Pure Select Mild Carbon Steel for a soft feel, but the new versions are slightly smaller and more compact. According to Mizuno, the top edges have been narrowed by 10 percent compared to the JPX-900 Tour irons. Despite being made with a more compact shape, however, Mizuno says the irons offer “surprising stability for a compact players’ iron,” according to a press release.

That’s because the irons have a “stability frame” that maximizes weight distribution for off-center hits, and it also reinforces the topline and toe areas for sound/vibration dampening. The soles have also been made wider, but with more camber for enhanced playability, according to Mizuno.

They also have a zero-glare Pearl Brush finish.

The JPX919 Tour irons will be available in right-hand only, and will sell for $1,200 in an 8-piece set (3-PW), or $150 per club.

JPX919 Tour Specs

Click here for more photos.

JPX919 Hot Metal irons

While the JPX919 Tour irons are made from 1025E, the JPX919 Hot metal irons are made from High Strength Chromoly 4140M. The new Hot Metals have multi-thickness faces for greater ball speeds, and one-piece face cups. Like the JPX919 Tour irons, the Hot Metal irons have a stability frame to enhance stability at impact, but they also have Sound Ribs that are designed to to “hit specific vibration patterns that ensure a satisfying sensation,” according to Mizuno.

“The most impressive thing about the JPX919 Hot Metal is the launch control and flight apex,” says Voshall. “The extra ball speed and distance doesn’t come from low-flying bullets – we work the design backwards from the correct landing angles. These are irons for the golf course, not just the launch monitor!”

Also, the JPX919 Hot Metals have set-matching gap, sand a lob wedges that are made from softer X30 steel; the wedges have precision milled grooves for greater spin control, as well.

These irons are available in both left-handed and right-handed, and they will for $1,000 in 8-piece sets (4-LW), or $125 per club.

JPX919 Hot Metal

Click here for more photos.

JPX919 Forged irons

Mizuno’s JPX919 forged irons are made with a new engineering process; they’re “reverse milled,” meaning they’re CNC-milled from the sole up, thus creating a “larger area of minimum face thickness,” according to Mizuno. The result? The company’s “fastest ever one-piece forged irons in terms of measured ball speed.”

The JPX919 Forged irons are forged from 1025B mild carbon steel; Boron is infused into the steel, making it 30 percent stronger, according to Mizuno. The additional strength allows for a wider milling across the back of the face, according to Mizuno, which leads to greater energy transfer into the ball.

Mizuno’s JPX919-Forged irons will be available in both right-handed and left-handed. They will sell for $1,300 in an 8-piece set (4-GW), or for $163 per club.

JPX919 Forged

See more photos of the Mizuno JPX919 irons in our forums.

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37 Comments

37 Comments

  1. Jack Nash

    Sep 19, 2018 at 4:10 pm

    They build the nicest looking irons.

  2. Brad

    Sep 3, 2018 at 4:09 pm

    “…the irons have a “stability frame” that maximizes weight distribution for off-center hits, and it also reinforces the topline and toe areas for sound/vibration dampening.”
    This is exactly the weight distribution on the PING ZING iron design.

    • roger

      Oct 2, 2018 at 3:09 pm

      If Miz had put a high density tungsten plug low in the toe to displace the lower density steel, the hollow cavity would be larger and more forgiving… believe it

  3. Pr

    Aug 31, 2018 at 11:24 am

    I dunno………. that cavity has been stretched so far into the hosel it looks weird………… is that even safe? I’d have to look at it in person to see what would happen in the loft-lie machine when I go to bend it…………

    • Thomas A

      Sep 4, 2018 at 9:55 am

      No definitely not safe. Mizuno definitely did not test and retest these irons. They just pressed some out, attached them to shafts and will keep their fingers crossed.

  4. Scott

    Aug 30, 2018 at 7:40 pm

    Yawn…

  5. Eric

    Aug 30, 2018 at 3:31 pm

    I know all the superlative “fastest, best, most stable” etc is just the usual recycled industry hooey, but ooh do I want ’em! I think my old JPX 825 pros may be out of the bag.

  6. Haak

    Aug 30, 2018 at 3:53 am

    Interesting loft gaps on the forged between 9-8-7 irons? Error in the table or no? Strange.

    • dtowngolf

      Aug 31, 2018 at 8:00 am

      This is a type by the staff. My catalog I have is not as stated in this article. The gaps are 4 degrees and the 8 is 36. Hope this helps

    • Jerry G

      Sep 14, 2018 at 12:54 am

      It’s 32, 36, 41, 46, 51

  7. Jay Beezy

    Aug 29, 2018 at 2:03 pm

    I don’t understand how and why companies are still trying to tout distance and jack lofts stronger which are much harder to hit for the average player. You then have a ridiculous 5-6 degree gap on scoring clubs and a tight spread on 4-5-6- thus eliminating those clubs as hittable for most mid handicappers. So they end up with 3-4 usable clubs per set (7-PW) with 15 yard distance gaps between them and that would be for someone who can hit it solid. Couple with that shoddy ball striking and you have sets that are basically worthless for non single digit players. You can either advertise distance or playability but not both. a 20* 4 iron on the hotmetal is hilarious. Just stop. Someone has to lead, and sadly even Titleist and Mizuno caved in. Caveman golf.

    • jgpl001

      Aug 30, 2018 at 9:17 am

      Absolutely spot on, well said

    • chance

      Sep 4, 2018 at 1:05 am

      Completely agree. I think people just want to be able to say they hit their 7 iron 190 yards. Rather sad that we’re in this odd phase of equipment coupled with distance hype marketing.

      • ~j~

        Sep 7, 2018 at 9:37 am

        Yup. Got a budy who went with the new M3 irons, claims now he hits his irons the same distances I do with my weaker-lofted Mizzys. Doesn’t seem to get it though when I tell him his lofts are all 3-4* stronger per club than mine.

        In all fairness he does hit them better, more accurate, than his former set. I’d rather have better accuracy and feel than a few extra yards though anyday.

  8. koober

    Aug 29, 2018 at 1:02 pm

    That badge on the Forged head looks like it was stuck on by my 5-year-old grandson. Macaroni art-worthy. Also, no Tour model for left-handers? Again?? You’re driving me to Srixon…

    • Andrew

      Aug 30, 2018 at 7:36 pm

      Totally agree – so frustrating!! I would try/get those tours in a heartbeat if offered in left hand. I will look at the forged but it is frustrating. I’m old enougth to remember when the TP9 was the only ‘players’ club Mizuno had available to lefties (and of course i wanted the TP19!)

      • Chris H

        Sep 3, 2018 at 3:06 pm

        I’m with you too guys!! Tweeter this to Voshall who didn’t respond. Mizuno are simply not a viable option for me to even CONSIDER because the LH offerings suck. Another failure…

        • Jerry G

          Sep 14, 2018 at 12:56 am

          The forged are offered in LH

        • Steve

          Oct 8, 2018 at 1:32 pm

          Mizuno is in the business of turning a profit. There aren’t enough sets sold to justify the costs of molds and manufacturing. They aren’t Callaway.
          While I sympathize with LH golfers, it’s not a conspiracy. It’s about staying in business.

  9. koober

    Aug 29, 2018 at 12:56 pm

    Love my now decade-old Mizzy’s, but I echo my fellow left-handers in expressing my disappointment and frustration with Mizuno that the Tour’s are again not available to me. I love the way they’ve preserved a classic look while keeping up with technology, but I feel Mizuno is a bit backward and willingly blind in not offering all models in left hand version.

    • TwoLegsMcManus

      Aug 29, 2018 at 6:29 pm

      “a bit backward and willingly blind”
      As someone who fits many, many minority categories *as a consumer*, I empathize with the plight of lefties.

      Mizuno is simply a capitalist company behaving with modern capitalist guidelines. Ask any MBA.

      Left handers are 10% of the population, presumably the same % of golfers.

      If a company makes an iron that appeals to ~10% of its market (anything like the Tour falls into this category), potential LH sales are such a small percentage that it’s likely a loss.

      There was a time when companies would allow loss in some areas – to keep the minority customers – and “make it back” with their best sellers (plus maybe bags, caps, etc).

      Modern capitalism dictates that any “flavor” that’s 10% isn’t worth making at all. Big sellers only, big box, one size fits all. All lefties can play the single left-handed model we offer. OR, pay an enormous premium for something truly “custom”.

      (Under socialism, workers control production, you could guarantee left-handed everything.)

      • Eric

        Aug 30, 2018 at 3:36 pm

        That’s an interesting point…im actually a lefty as is my father, and we both play right handed. If we’re not completely unusual in doing so, and I don’t believe we are, my guess is the actual percentage of lefty golfers might be even lower, like closer to 5%.

        • Thomas A

          Sep 4, 2018 at 9:59 am

          I’m left handed, play right handed. My father and brother as well.

  10. 2putttom

    Aug 29, 2018 at 12:48 pm

    wonderful

  11. Josh

    Aug 29, 2018 at 12:40 pm

    Why does it look like the badge isn’t seated properly on that one picture of the Forged model?

  12. rex235

    Aug 29, 2018 at 12:20 pm

    Glad Voshall is so “stoked”…

    Just like we said a week ago-

    Mizuno JPX 919 Tour – RH Only.

  13. Caroline

    Aug 29, 2018 at 12:16 pm

    Great looking irons, but look at the pictures of that insert on the back. see the corner of badge sticking up like it almost doesn’t fit? Just like some of the Ping irons the badges catch dirt along with the look is like you slapped some lead tape on the back of your iron or maybe you like that 1950’s look.

  14. Patrick

    Aug 29, 2018 at 11:44 am

    Why did I even get my hopes up that the tour would be available left handed #dissapointed

  15. Walter

    Aug 29, 2018 at 11:37 am

    Nice looking but more jacked up lofts compared to my MPs. Yes not so much on the tour version but still jacked.

  16. Chris

    Aug 29, 2018 at 10:52 am

    Kudos for not going crazy with the lofts, PW at 45/46

  17. ht

    Aug 29, 2018 at 9:49 am

    Made them with Brooks in mind is right. wThe tours have a similar shape as the Nike Vapor Fly iron brooks uses, but admittedly much nicer.Those forged look good too

  18. Single Digit Lefty

    Aug 29, 2018 at 9:41 am

    I stopped reading at “right-hand only.” Mizuno apparently doesnt want to build a club for me. I have the 900 Forged now and I like them, but much prefer the look of the Tour version and was hoping this version would be available.

    I’m not mad, just disappointed.

    • Chilly Dipper

      Aug 29, 2018 at 9:54 am

      I’m totally on the same page. So frustrating..

    • Andrew

      Sep 11, 2018 at 9:08 pm

      Well on the plus side for us lefties perhaps the badge will actually fit on the left hand model to make up for the lack of a Tour in left hand. Ha! 🙂

  19. Andersuk

    Aug 29, 2018 at 8:39 am

    Gotta hand it to Mizuno, that tour looks good!

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Equipment

2020 TaylorMade SIM UDI, SIM DHY utility irons: Options at the top of your bag

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TaylorMade Golf has today announced the arrival of its all-new for 2020 TaylorMade SIM UDI and SIM DHY utility irons. According to Senior Manager of Product Creation for Irons, Matt Bovee, the SIM UDI and SIM DHY were designed to offer players options between the existing UDI (a lower-launching, lower-spinning utility iron) and the SIM Max Rescue.  

Both new additions from TaylorMade feature a rounded camber from heel to toe that bids to improve turf interaction, particularly on uneven lies. This rounded camber is designed to add to the versatility of each club—making them playable off the tee, from the fairway, in the rough and even from the bunker.

 https://www.pgatour.com/daily-wrapup/2020/08/09/collin-morikawa-wins-2020-pga-championship-tpc-harding-park.html

Like the company’s SIM Max fairway woods and Rescue, the SIM UDI and SIM DHY driving irons feature a hollow body construction with a forged C300 steel face. 

This ultra-strong steel aims to maximize ball speeds while also delivering a forged feel to each product. Additional similarities include SpeedFoam, and the Thru-Slot Speed Pocket, which is designed to aid performance on shots struck low on the face.

More photos and discussion in the forums.

taylormade-sim-udi-sim-dhy

Comparisons of the sole widths of 2020 TaylorMade SIM UDI and DHY utilities.

TaylorMade SIM DHY

The SIM DHY contains a thicker topline, wider sole, and a shallower profile that seeks to provide players with hybrid-like forgiveness. The SIM DHY also features a larger head shape that is designed to deliver confidence-inspiring visual cues while maintaining a sleek aesthetic.

The hollow body construction of the SIM DHY has been designed to allow for a low and deep CG placement, which subsequently aims to offer easy launch with a mid-high trajectory.

Working alongside these low CG characteristics is a newly developed SpeedFoam material which is 35% less dense than the standard urethane foam injection used in other TaylorMade products (P•790, P•770 and P•790 UDI). Per TaylorMade, The lighter material allowed company engineers to position CG lower within the clubhead in a bid to promote a higher launch and trajectory while promoting a soft, solid feel.

More photos and discussion in the forums.

new-taylormade-udi

Adding to the low-CG properties is a port on the sole of the club where the SpeedFoam is injected. The port is filled with a heavy TPS screw-in design to drive CG even lower.

TaylorMade SIM UDI

In contrast, the SIM UDI contains a more traditional players iron profile with a thinner topline and slimmer sole which seeks to offer enhanced workability and shot-making characteristics.

With the new SIM UDI, the TPS port is positioned on the rear of the club. This positioning is designed to raise the CG slightly to promote a lower launch and more penetrating ball flight.

2020-taylormade-sim-udi-face

Along with the C300 face and SpeedFoam, the new addition from TaylorMade also features aggressive scorelines across the face in a bid to provide players with the feel of a fully forged iron while maintaining the performance of a hollow body construction.

2020-taylormade-sim-udi-face

More photos and discussion in the forums.

Specs, Pricing & Availability

Specs:

  • SIM UDI – Comes equipped with a graphite Mitsubishi DiamanaThumpshaft (X 100g, S 90g) as well as a Lamkin Crossline 360 grip. Available in lofts of 18° and 20° in both RH and LH.
  • SIM DHY – Comes equipped with a graphite Mitsubishi Diamana Limited shaft (S 75g, R65g, A 55g) as well as a Lamkin Crossline 360 grip. Available lofts of 17°, 19°, 22° and 25° in both RH and LH.

Availability:

  • Both SIM UDI and SIM DHY will be available for preorder on August 14 and at retail beginning September 4.

Pricing:

  • SIM UDI – $249
  • SIM DHY – $249
2020-taylormade-sim-udi-taylormade-udi

Comparison photo of the 2020 TaylorMade SIM UDI and the TaylorMade UDI.

More photos and discussion in the forums.

 

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Equipment

2020 TaylorMade P770 irons: Distance and precision redefined

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New 2020 TaylorMade P770 irons are here, and with them, a reminder that every club in your bag has a purpose.

A driver is designed to go as far as possible, wedges are designed to be versatile precision instruments, and iron sets are built for both. The new 2020 TaylorMade P770 irons from TaylorMade bring together the distance of the extremely popular P790 with the precision of a midsized player cavity to offer distance and control to an iron unlike TaylorMade has ever produced.

2020 TaylorMade P770

2020 TaylorMade P770 6-iron. Cavity view.

More photos and discussion in the forums. 

TaylorMade P770 irons: The origin story

The story of the P770 starts with two clubs—the P760 and the P790. Now, if my math is correct, the combination of the two clubs would actually create the 775, but in the world of irons, that model number was taken over a decade ago by another OEM, and if we’re being honest, 770 sounds better anyways.

2020 TaylorMade P770, TaylorMade P790 comparison.

2020 TaylorMade P770, TaylorMade P790 comparison.

Let’s start with the P790 and its ability to infiltrate the golf bags of players of all skill levels. According to TaylorMade’s fitting database, the 790 is a club that can be found in the bags of players from +4 handicaps all the way up to golfers looking to break 100.

What makes the P790 so functional and appealing to so many golfers starts with its looks and ends with its performance. The P790 has the clean appearance of a blade iron from the back, and from address, it maintains sharper line associated with a  players club.

But off the clubface, or should I say all over the clubface, you get ball speed and launch conditions normally reserved for a much larger game improvement club. This iron helped redefine what is now known as the “players distance” category, and whether you consider that title an oxymoron or not, it’s impossible to argue with its popularity.

Then we have the P760, TaylorMade’s first combo iron set, which combined the power of SpeedFoam-filled longer irons with the precision of single-piece forged short irons. These irons again found their way into the golf bags of mid-handicaps to players all over the professional tours thanks to their ability to offer extra forgiveness and launch in longer clubs while still maintaining a small player’s look and preferred feel.

Regardless of skill, one of the biggest factors in the playability of any iron relies on a golfer’s ability to create speed, launch, spin, and angle of descent—the below video featuring our own Brian Knudson testing the P790 Ti is the perfect example of how an iron with strong lofts, for example, can launch higher and descend at an angle to make them playable when you combine the right technologies.

The ultimate design goal of the P770 was to combine the best of both these irons into a small, fast, playable package using every technology available to the engineers and designers at TaylorMade. This iron is about precision without sacrificing distance.

If you are a golfer looking for maximum workability and shotmaking control that puts less of a premium on distance, then the P7MB or P7MC is probably more up your ally, but if distance is still a big part of your decision-making process for a set of irons, then buckle up.

More photos and discussion in the forums. 

The technology

A look inside the construction of the P770

A simplistic way to describe the P770 would be to call it a shrunk-down version of the 790, but doing that would not give justice to the actual engineering that went into this design. The reason is, you can’t just shrink down a golf club and expect it to perform the same as a larger club, because not only are the mass properties different, but trying to maintain additional ball speed would be like expecting a smaller trampoline to bounce you as high as a larger one with bigger springs—the physics don’t add up.

“Designed to deliver P790-like performance in a smaller package, the all-new P770 leverages forged hollow body construction to pack as much distance and forgiveness as possible into a compact player’s shape.” – Matt Bovee, Product Creation

From address, and looking at the sole and toe profile, the P770 has a much stronger resemblance to the previous P760 than the 790, but from the back and from a technology standpoint, its got the guts of the P790.

The key technologies are

  • A SpeedFoam-supported forged 4140 high-speed steel face attached to a soft forged 8620 carbon steel body. Since the hosel is part of the forged body, you get the full lie and loft adjustability of a forged club along with the ball speed of a larger one. The secondary benefit of SpeedFoam is it creates an iron that feels extremely solid while being a multipiece construction
  • The other part of the speed story is the Thru Slot in the sole which helps shots hit lower on the face retain more ball speed and helps create extra launch. This technology runs from the 3-7 irons.
  • Speaking of launch, the new P770 has 46 grams of tungsten in the 3-7 irons positioned as low and as far back as possible towards the toe to boost MOI and launch in the longer clubs while precisely locating the center of gravity.
  • The final piece of the puzzle that helps with both distance and distance control is the Progressive Inverted Cone Technology or IVT. It is positioned closer to the toe in the longer irons to help with common mishits and moves higher and more heel ward into the shorter clubs. This keeps ball speeds variances as consistent as possible through the set.

More photos and discussion in the forums. 

Choose your own P700 Series adventure

This is the part where the whole iron series really excels. For a long time, it used to be OEMs would release a number of iron sets that catered to various golfers but didn’t really have any cross over potential as far as building combo sets because of the large differences between designs. To counter this, they would often design exclusive combo sets either catered to better players or to higher handicaps/slower speed players with game improvement irons paired with hybrid long irons.

From the beginning and by design, the entire P700 series has been built to be custom combo’ed for any golfer—an impressive design feat. This allows players of varying ability with different swing and player traits to get exactly what they need out of different parts of their set. They have even gone as far to make sure that no matter how someone is looking to build their set, they can get looks, offset, bounce, and performance to match up from club to club—they even have an easy-to-follow chart!

Pricing, availability, and specs

The TaylorMade P770 irons will be available for pre-order starting August 14th and will be be available in retail shops starting September 4th.

They will be available from 3iron to pitching wedge in right and left-handed with an A wedge option available to right-handed players only. An 8 piece set starts at $1399 (174.88 per club) with KBS Tour steel shafts and Golf Pride Z-Grip grey and black as stock.

P770 Stock Specs

More photos and discussion in the forums. 

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2020 TaylorMade P7MB and P7MC irons: Pressure to perfection

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One word defines the new 2020 Taylormade P7MB and P7MC forged irons: Pressure.

It’s a word we all know and feel. For the best golfers in the world, it’s what they chase day in and day out. In the case of TaylorMade, the pressure to deliver time in and time out increases with every launch of a new product. It’s also the application of pressure and what it represents that makes this story so interesting.

Introducing the new 2020 TaylorMade P7MB and P7MC forged irons. Using the popular P730 and P750 irons as the starting point, Senior Manager of Product Creation for Irons Matt Bovee and his team have left no stone unturned to deliver a one-two punch that will please both P730/750 die-hards (yes, they exist) and any players who were on the edge.

With the help of modern technology, periodic feedback from the tour staff, and the admiration of classic forgings from TaylorMade’s past, the 2020 TaylorMade P-7MB, and P-7MC  accomplished just what was required—they created irons with serious curb appeal that stood up to the most discerning pallets in the world: TM’s iconic tour staff.

More photos and discussion in the forums. 

TaylorMade P7MB irons

The new 2020 TaylorMade P7MB irons

The new 2020 TaylorMade P7MB irons

It needs to be said at the start that these new TaylorMade irons live in a different bucket than Tiger’s P7TW. Although those irons are used by a few players on tour, they were essentially built for one man and one swing—that’s it. So as not to confuse the issue, the TaylorMade P7MB is a stand-alone project designed to go in the bags of the likes of Rory (where they already are), DJ, Collin Morikawa, and a number of others on the major tours.

P7MB: The beginning

Just over 14 months ago, the development of the P7MB began. The nice thing was, TaylorMade had a good jumping-off point—the P730 “DJ Proto.” Although that iron has the stock P730 optics from afar, the DJ Proto has a longer blade length and a more contemporary look at address then the retail version.

“The P7MB, as far as inspiration for it, is simply just the evolution from the last two to three models starting with the 2014 Tour Preferred MB”

-Matt Bovee, Taylor Made Lead Designer Irons

Looking down at the new 2020 TaylorMade P7MB, you will see the influence of the DJ Proto. A longer blade length (1.4 mm longer than P730) complemented by a thin top line, slightly less offset (6-iron: 1.5 mm vs 1.8 mm in P730), and a similar sole profile checks off every box that players at the highest level want to see.

Unfortunately, getting that part down is only half the riddle. In this day and age, muscle back irons live in a very small box as far as what you can do. Optics are one thing, and most get that right, it’s the sound and feel and turf interaction that separates the men from the boys.

So what’s new?

So, what exactly will players experience with the P7MB iron?

Although it’s every marketing rep’s dream to say “more everything in every category,” in this particular instance, it’s in the nuance and very fine details that TM has made upgrades. To be honest “more everything” isn’t the win here. The victory is delivering an iron that performs apples to apples with the P730 all while offering a traditional look, a dash of forgiveness with the longer blade length (1.4 mm longer), and even better sound and feel.

2020 TaylorMade P7MB top line

This is where the “pressure” story comes in. TaylorMade R&D wanted to ensure that every process that could get maxed out to make this iron flawless would. The industry standard for forging weight pressure is around 1,000 tons, TaylorMade utilizes a 2,000-ton forging press to push the quality tolerance of every 1025 carbon steel forging to its peak. In simple terms, it’s like putting so much pressure on something you squeeze the air and any opportunity for a blemish clean out.

Secondly, the back muscle has gone through a cosmetic change. This was made for two main reasons

  1. to look amazing in the bag
  2. to dial in CG as close to perfect as they could

As with previous TaylorMade offerings, the use of milling across the face ensures consistency and sharp lines—and offers scoring lines that have been a staple in most TaylorMade players clubs.

The new 2020 TaylorMade P7MB face on

The muscle on the P7MB features a three-dimensional section out near the toe to not only highlight the distribution of weight but to add a little cachet to an already stunning golf club.

“We wanted to add a third dimension to that back section in order to do something special and at the same time stick the CG exactly where our staff wants to see it.”

-Matt Bovee TM

Truth be told, the new 2020 TaylorMade P7MB is a contemporary throwback. More so than any other TM blade in recent history (with the exception of RAC MB), this blade has a look and feel that can stand the test of time.

More photos and discussion in the forums. 

Initial reactions on tour

I was told that during the marketing shoot at the Floridian last October a few of the TM staff got a first glance at the MB. This is always the first real test for someone in Matt Bovee’s position, that first eyeball reaction is huge. Get the wrong look and it could throw off the whole project, get a good look and momentum goes from cruising to a full sprint.

Down the line, it was admiration from the first three to see it—DJ, Collin, and Wolff—to Rory’s smile at first glance and ultimate quick integration going into Memorial.

“At the photoshoot last fall we showed the early prototype to Wolff and Morikawa and they were all over it immediately, their eyes lit up seeing only the head and at that point, I knew we were on to something special.”

-Matt Bovee TM

Speaking to the forgiveness part for a second. Rory has been a combo set player for a long time. The top of his iron set is typically a P760/750 3 and 4-iron and 5-PW the 730’s. After spending some time at home with the P7MB he felt the new MB’s were plenty forgiving top to bottom and showed up to Memorial with a full set of 3-PW.

Here is a quick peek at Rory’s first reaction from earlier this year…

Rory McIlroy’s bag, featuring 3-PW in TaylorMade P7MB.

The experience

I am by no means a player who is drawn to a forged muscle back. Maybe in the rare case, I’ll have it in 9/PW. The point is, they don’t provide enough help for a player like me. However, these are easy to hit, believe it or not. The longer blade length gives the appearance of a club that wants to square up, and I also appreciated the lines on the P7MB.

For the TaylorMade blade aficionados, the P7MB (to my eye) lives somewhere between the RAC MB and the 2014 Tour Preferred. The top-line is slightly straight, but not as much as the P7TW, and the toe shape could be called softly squared off. It’s an elegant design and doesn’t scare you sitting it down.

The acoustics are where you will experience that 2,000 tons of pressure—especially on a center-thin strike. The P730, when caught thin, sounded really thin, the P7MB does dull that out a bit and makes those shots a bit less painful than they could be.

I was able to go club-for-club with the P7TW, P730, and P7MB, and without getting into a data rabbit hole, I carried the P7MB about four yards further on average. Not a ton, but certainly enough to acknowledge.

P7MB: Overall

Winner, winner. Let’s be really honest here, what were the odds of this club not checking off every box? The muscle back war is won in the whole experience—from how it looks in the bag, to that first center strike, all the way to how it makes you feel as a player.

Is this club for 10 handicappers? No. 8’s? No. It was designed for the Rorys, DJs, and Collin Morikawas of the world. TaylorMade wanted to make a superb “staff blade” and Bovee and his crew did it. No small feat. The P730 was involved in a ton of great golf over the past three years—hard to improve on that. But they did—just in a very nuanced way. Well done.

Specs

Available for preorder on August 14, 2020, and in stores beginning September 4, 2020, P7MB irons ($1,399) will be offered in (3-PW) and come equipped with KBS Tour steel shafts (X 130g, S 120g) as well as the Golf Pride Z-Grip in grey/black. Available in RH and yes LH)

More photos and discussion in the forums. 

TaylorMade P7MC irons

Its predecessor, the P750, is arguably the best players cavity back TaylorMade has ever designed. With multiple wins across the world and a strong presence among top amateurs and college players, the P750 won players over for one main reason: simplicity.

So, when Matt Bovee and the team decided to go back in and build something new, there weren’t a lot of places to go beyond one or two ticks better. In this iron class, that’s all that is required.

Introducing the new 2020 TaylorMade P7MC players cavity back iron.

2020 TaylorMade P7MC

“We had a great foundation to work off of with the P750 so the main things we wanted to focus on was keeping the DNA of a great iron and simply making it sound and feel a little better and be a bit more appealing sitting in the bag.”

-Matt Bovee TM

Visuals

At address, the 2020 TaylorMade P7MC will look very similar to the P750—why mess with a good thing? The part of this iron that players will appreciate is the nod to TaylorMade heritage—i.e. the 2005 TP Forged and the Japan-only version.

More photos and discussion in the forums. 

So, what’s new?

Like its muscle back sibling, the 2020 TaylorMade P7MC incorporates the same 2,000-ton pressure forging to ensure the feel and sound are dialed in. This iron is also truly a one-piece forging, no titanium plugs, no extra badging no real bells, and whistles. The player will notice a slightly longer blade length (the P750), thin top line and a touch more offset then the P7MB.

It’s a simple clean players cavity back that looks amazing in the bag, behind the ball, and most likely on TV. Trust me, even that matters.

In addition, the milling process gives P7MC the sharp lines and grooves we can expect from TaylorMade forgings.

The New TaylorMade P7MC Face On

The experience

Like the P7MB, I had the chance to test the MC, and what I liked most about it was the lack of surprises. Yes, it’s stunning to look at, probably more so than any club TaylorMade had made in recent memory, including the P7TW. It’s gorgeous, but past that, the iron is just a workhorse. It has a crisp feel, plays very similar to the MB with the exception of mishits for obvious reasons. Simple, simple, simple. For the best players in the world, that’s all they want. Does it look good? Yes. Feel good? Yes. Most importantly will it take a long time to transition from my P750’s? No.

In this category, I like that. In the MB, MC category, a 1-2 percent improvement is all you really want to see.

Overall

It will come as a shock to no one, the 2020 TaylorMade P7MC is everything die-hard P750 players would want. The DNA of a great iron is there, they feel a bit better with the new pressure process, they look ridiculously cool, offer a pinch more forgiveness, and most importantly, they do the job.

Specs

 

Available for preorder on August 14 and at retail beginning September 4

P7MC irons ($1,399) will be offered in (3-PW) and come equipped with KBS Tour steel shafts (X 130g, S 120g) as well as the Golf Pride Z-Grip in grey/black. Available in RH and LH.

More photos and discussion in the forums. 

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