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Full details on Ping’s new i500 and i210 irons, and Glide Forged wedges

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In recent weeks, we’ve spotted a number of different Ping irons and wedges. We saw Tony Finau testing an i500 driving iron, we saw Bubba Watson using Glide Forged wedges, and we also spotted photos of a new i210 iron. The problem was, Ping wasn’t giving up any information on the new clubs, so we didn’t know when or if they’d would be released to the public, or what was different about the new products.

Now, we have all of the info on the Ping i500 and i210 irons, and the Ping Glide Forged wedges. We were lucky enough to have Marty Jertson, Director of Product Development at Ping and a recent 2018 PGA Championship qualifier, on our Two Guys Talking Golf (TG2) podcast to explain the designs and technology for the three different product releases. Snippets from the full podcast are embedded below. Additionally, we provide all of the necessary spec and pricing information.

All of the products are now available for custom fitting or pre-order at authorized Ping shops around the United States.

Click here for comparison photos against PXG, Artisan and P-790 clubs.

Ping i500 irons

The Ping i500 is actually quite similar to the G700 iron, which also has a hollow-body construction, but yet the i500 has a sleeker-shaped profile. The i500 irons are built with C300 maraging steel faces and 17-4 stainless steel bodies; Ping says this design increases ball speed, lowers spin and creates higher-flying shots.

Available in 3-PW and UW, the Ping i500 irons will sell for $175 per club with a steel shaft and $190 per club with a graphite shaft. Stock steel shafts will be the True Temper Dynamic Gold 105 (R300, S300), stock graphite shafts will be the UST Mamiya Recoil ES SMAC (760A, 780R, 780S), and a number of aftermarket shafts are also available at no upcharge. The stock grip is the Golf Pride Tour Velvet (Blue -1/16 inches, Red -1/32 inches, Aqua -1/64 inches, White Std., Gold +1/32 inches, Orange +1/16 inches).

In-hand photos of the new Ping i500 irons

Ping i210 irons

Replacing the i200 irons, the new i210 irons are made from 431 stainless steel, and they have a larger and softer elastomer insert. The bigger insert is said to not only increase perimeter weighting for greater forgiveness, but also to help fine-tune swing weight and create an overall softer feel. The shaping of the irons have also been refined, according to Ping.

Available in 3-PW and UW, the Ping i210 irons will sell for $137.50 per iron with a steel shaft, and $152.50 per iron with a graphite shaft. The stock steel offering is a True Temper Dynamic Gold 120 (S300, X100), the graphite offering is an Alta CB (Soft R, Regular, Stiff), and there are a number of aftermarket options with no upcharge.

In-hand photos of the new Ping i210 irons

Ping Glide Forged wedges

Forged from 8620 carbon steel, the new Ping Glide Forged wedges have a “sleek, high-spinning blade-style design with a soft, pleasing feel,” according to a Ping press release. They’re the product of Louis Oosthuizen, Stan Utley and Todd Anderson working with Ping Engineers to develop a wedge with greater feel and versatility, says Ping. Like the Glide 2.0 wedges, the new Glide Forged wedges have wheel-cut grooves, which have a sharp edge radius to increase friction for more spin and trajectory control.

The new Glide Forged wedges are also customizable with different graphics, stamping and paint fills, which are highlighted below.

  • Graphic Options: Mr. PING logo, American flag, Arizona desert scene, Boomerang
  • Stamping Options: 1) Up to three characters (A-Z, 0-9) in one of three locations (toe, center or heel); 2) Two characters applied in scattered fashion; 3) Mr. PING logo scattered.
  • Paint-fill options: Black, Gold, Brown, Orange, Purple, Red, Blue, Yellow, Green, White, Silver, Maroon

Check out ping.com/glideforgedcustom to design your wedges.

Ping’s new Glide Forged wedges are available in 50, 52, 54, 56, 58 and 60 degree lofts, and they will sell for $217.50 per wedge with a steel shaft and $232.50 per wedge with a graphite shaft. The stock steel shaft will be a True Temper Dynamic Gold S300, the graphite shaft will be an Alta CB (Soft R, Regular, Stiff), and there are more aftermarket shafts available at no upcharge.

Listen to the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes!

In-hand photos of the new Ping Glide Forged wedges.

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12 Comments

12 Comments

  1. Brandon

    Jul 16, 2018 at 9:25 pm

    In before that guy who always complains about irons not being true forgings anymore. He is right, but does it really need to be repeated on every article?

    • ogo

      Jul 17, 2018 at 12:50 pm

      These clubs are fake-forged because they are only cold stamped coin forged steel castings. They are not hot forged like Mizunos and Miuras which alters the grain structure of the steel for that soft buttery forged feeeel… ;-(

  2. golfraven

    Jul 16, 2018 at 5:23 pm

    what is happening here? you would thing they would put the True Temper Dynamic Gold 105 (R300, S300) shaft in the i210 and not theTrue Temper Dynamic Gold 120 (S300,X100). X100 for a GI iron – wtf?

    • Alec

      Jul 16, 2018 at 6:41 pm

      I mean, the i210 isn’t a game improvement iron

  3. Boyo

    Jul 16, 2018 at 11:27 am

    I have the i200’s and would kill for a matched SW at 54 degrees. The Glide’s don’t cut it…..

  4. DB

    Jul 16, 2018 at 11:19 am

    Wedges are pricey – but being forged with tungsten plug in the toe, custom graphics, etc., probably does increase their cost significantly.

    New irons look great.

  5. Zbb

    Jul 16, 2018 at 9:46 am

    Hit both yesterday. Thought the i500 were very nice and looked great. Effortless distance.

  6. jake

    Jul 16, 2018 at 9:46 am

    Not sure how they’re going to move many wedges @ $217

    • Dan

      Jul 22, 2018 at 5:48 pm

      Why not? A custom Callaway MD is $230, a custom Wedge works BV wedge is around $240. Ping is cheaper than both.

  7. dat

    Jul 16, 2018 at 9:23 am

    Pretty expensive, even for Ping.

  8. carl

    Jul 16, 2018 at 9:08 am

    $217 for a wedge? wow

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Whats in the Bag

Kevin Na’s winning WITB: 2019 Charles Schwab Challenge

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Driver: Callaway GBB Epic (9 degrees)


Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD GP 6-TX

3-wood: Callaway Epic Flash Sub Zero (13.5 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana BF 70 TX

Hybrid: PXG 0317 X Gen 2 (19 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD DI 95X

Irons: Callaway Rogue Pro (4), Callaway Apex Pro 16 (5-PW)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Wedges: Callaway Mack Daddy 4 Wedges (50, 54 degrees), Vokey Design prototype (’18) (60 degrees)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Putter: Odyssey Toulon Madison

Grips: Golf Pride Tour Velvet

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

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Equipment

The top-5 longest drivers on the PGA Tour and their driver/shaft combos

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Let’s take a look at what the PGA Tour’s biggest bombers thus far in 2018-2019 are using to launch their rockets.

1. Cameron Champ

Average drive: 315.6 yards


Driver: Ping G400 Max (9 degrees @ 7.9)


Shaft: Fujikura Pro 63 TS (44.75 inches, tipped 1.5 inches)

T2. Luke List

Average drive: 314.4 yards
Driver: TaylorMade M6 (9 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana White D+ 80TX

T2. Rory McIlroy

Average drive: 314.4 yards


Driver: TaylorMade M5 (9 degrees)


Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei CK White 70TX

4. Tony Finau

Average drive: 311.5 yards


Driver: Ping G410 Plus (9 degrees @ 8)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana RF 70-TX (45.25 inches, tipped 1 inch)

5. Wyndham Clark

Average drive: 311.4 yards


Driver: PXG 0811 XF GEN2 (10 degrees)


Shaft: Accra Prototype (45.25 inches)

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Equipment

WRX Spotlight Review: TaylorMade M5 fairway Rocket 3

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Product: TaylorMade M5 fairway Rocket 3

Pitch: The TaylorMade M5 fairway Rocket 3 is a stronger-lofted version of the standard TaylorMade M5 3-wood. The Rocket is 14 degrees. The standard M5 is 15.

Our take on the TaylorMade M5 Rocket 3

“WOW, you really hit that 3-wood like a rocket!”

” Not like a rocket… an actual Rocket!”

The beloved 3-wood. A favorite club of both average golfers and pros alike, a club that many will hold onto well after what some might consider their “best before” date. But with new options and improved technology, these old faithfuls are getting the boot quicker for a lot of reasons including the ability to better dial in a fit and help minimizing misses.

Since making a club faster off the middle is becoming more and more difficult thanks to the limits set forth but the USGA, OEMs are changing the way we think about clubs and putting a greater focus on decreasing dispersion and optimizing misses. TaylorMade is doing this with TwistFace, which was originally introduced in drivers a generation ago, and has now been included in the M5 and M6 fairway woods.

I got to spend some time with the knowledgeable crew at TaylorMade Canada in their new indoor facility just north of Toronto (lets call it Kingdom North) In that time, we went through a driver fitting, and then to the new M5 fairway woods to try and replace one of my oldest faithfuls: a 14-degree SLDR Tour Spoon. To say I have a unique ability to elevate a fairway wood is something that even my fitter was a little surprised by. My numbers with my cranked down to 12 degree (measured) fairway off the deck were good but could be improved. I can hit it both ways (as much as a 6-handicap can actually claim that) but my trusted go-to shot is a slight fade with some heel bias contact because of my swing. I am willing to sacrifice some distance but usually hit it where I want.

What I saw at the end of the fitting was a club that produced longer shots along with a tighter dispersion without having to make or to try and make any changes to my swing. The final fit was a 14-degree “Rocket” M5 fairway set to 12 degrees. It beat out my SLDR by a total of nine yards, which is an increase of just over a total of three percent, including an additional six yards of carry.

To say I was honestly surprised would be an understatement. The SLDR TS is a club that the first time I hit it I went WHOA! Low spin, workable, looks exactly how I want that club to look (small and compact). You can see from the numbers below when it works it works.

Why does TwistFace work?

Let’s explain and get a little deep in the technology weeds for a second. Bulge and roll is not a new concept. In fact, it would be a lie to claim that all OEMs haven’t done something similar to this is the past or played with these two variables to help golfers hit better shots. Fact: Every OEM optimizes the bulge and roll on their clubs to increase speed and maximize performance. Tom Wishon actually had a line of woods at one point that went the other way had VERY limited roll from the top tine to the sole. With this design, more loft on the bottom of the head helped players who miss low or need help elevating the ball off the deck increase launch and spin. It worked. Cobra also has what it calls E9 technology to tweak bulge and roll to help maximize the speed and forgiveness of their woods. It also works.

What makes TaylorMade’s TwistFace different is that it is the most aggressive iteration of this bulge and roll tweaking yet, and by introducing it into the fairway woods and hybrids, it’s proving to be a winner — even for this now-proven wrong skeptic.

At the end of the day, the M5 Ti “Rocket” was a measurable improvement over my previous 3-wood. Now it would be disingenuous to say “if you aren’t using TwistFace in your fairway woods you’re not maximized,” but if you are someone that struggles with fairway wood dispersion and looking to find some extra distance for taking on par-5s, taking a look at the new M5 and M6 fairway woods as part of your next fitting should be very high on your list.

 

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