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Tony Romo won an amateur event by 9 strokes. Does this matter?

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Sure, Tony Romo failed to qualify for the U.S. Open and finished last in his PGA Tour debut at the Corales Puntacana Resort & Club Championship recently, but things aren’t all bad for the CBS analyst and his golf game.

According to The Journal Times, No. 9 won the Racine Tri-Course Amateur Championship in Wisconsin by nine shots Sunday–the win was his second at the tournament, which he also won in 2004.

Romo lead by five strokes heading into the final round, which was contested at Meadowbrook Country Club, Romo’s home course (haters will be keen to point to this fact). Rounds one and two were held at Racine Country Club and H.F. Johnson Park Golf Course, respectively.

“I stayed aggressive,” Romo told The Journal Times. “I took mostly conservative lines and aggressive swings, and that’s the approach you take when you have a lead. When you’re hitting it as solid as I’ve been hitting it, you can trust it — commit to the swing and hit it.

Indeed! The Journal Times report also indicated Romo is working with Chris O’Connell and Andy Traynor from Plane Truth Golf and he feels the pieces are falling into place.

What this means for his future professional prospects is unclear, but a nine-stroke win in any event is a notable feat, right? Or not so much?

Let us know what you think, WRXers.

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11 Comments

11 Comments

  1. Tartan Golf Travel

    Jul 11, 2018 at 2:01 am

    I agree with most. He’s a sold amateur. Most pros would give him at least 2-3 a side and beat him handily. Stick to amateur golf Tony.

  2. E

    Jul 11, 2018 at 12:19 am

    Stop hating, be happy for the guy

  3. Eric

    Jul 10, 2018 at 9:45 am

    He is a good amateur player. Nothing less and nothing more

    • Chris P.

      Jul 10, 2018 at 2:57 pm

      Perfectly stated. People who think Romo can make it on the PGA Tour simply don’t understand how wide the gap is between good amateurs and tour pros. They think it’s the distance from the Earth to the moon when it’s more like from the Earth to the Sun.

  4. Johnny Penso

    Jul 9, 2018 at 11:59 pm

    I just attended a Mackenzie Tour event here in Windsor, ON and watched a young kid named Mark Anguiano shoot the lights out at my 7000 yard links style course, shooting 24 under par. One of the guys chasing him, a Canadian named Taylor Pendrith, was driving the ball as much as 340 yards in the holes I followed him on. I’d say they have a far better chance of making the PGA Tour than Tony Romo.

  5. JB

    Jul 9, 2018 at 8:26 pm

    Tony is a nice guy and a very good golfer with a 0% chance of making a living on the pro tour. Still pretty cool story though!

  6. David

    Jul 9, 2018 at 7:05 pm

    That depends. What did he shoot? Even if the courses are easy, three straight rounds under par is a nice showing.

    • Jack

      Jul 9, 2018 at 8:23 pm

      68-71-69

      • Joe

        Jul 9, 2018 at 10:13 pm

        Definitely not a +5 which I’ve heard is the MINIMUM to consider teeing it up to make a payday….

  7. ChipNRun

    Jul 9, 2018 at 6:28 pm

    Let’s see… Former San Francisco QB John Brodie is the only NFL veteran to have won a pro golf tournament.

    [quote]”After retiring from the NFL, Brodie played from 1985-1998 on the Champions Tour, earning a dozen top-10 finishes and winning the 1991 Security Pacific Senior Classic by defeating George Archer and Chi Chi Rodriguez in a playoff. He suffered a serious stroke in 2000.”[/quote]
    http://www.usga.org/articles/2014/01/football-or-golf-john-brodie-didnt-have-to-choose-21474865804.html

    Brodie had significant experience with competitive golf (see article link for details):
    * Despite being Stanford University’s starting QB, he played two seasons of NCAA golf for his school. This meant he skipped spring practice for football.
    * Played in the 1959 and 1981 U.S. Opens, the longest recorded gap between appearances. (Got cut both times).
    * Upstart golf pro Jimmy Ballard – who originated The Connection teaching method – credits Brodie with introducing him to the idea of using video instant replay to analyze golf swings, just as the NFL teams used video tapes to analyze past games.

    So, can Tony Romo make it on the pro tour? That’s what everyone is asking. We’ll just have to wait and see. He would probably want to warm up for a season or two on Web.com tour, or something similar.

    • 3puttPar

      Jul 10, 2018 at 4:23 pm

      He wouldn’t make it through the qualifying stages to make the Web.Com Tour. Hes a solid amateur golfer, I don’t even think he’d make any money on something as simple as the Pepsi Tour or Dakotas Tour.

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19th Hole

68 at the British Open in the morning, golf with hickories at St Andrews in the afternoon

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Yes, golf fans, just another day in the charmed life (or week, at least) of one Brandon Stone.

Stoney (as I assume his friends call him), came to Carnoustie on the heels of a final-round 60 to win the Scottish Open. All he did in his opening round was fire a 3-under 68. Not bad!

But his Thursday to remember was only getting started as Stone made the 25-mile trip south to the Old Course to peg it…with a set of hickory clubs! Well played, sir, well played.

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Jean van de Velde’s 1999 British Open collapse is still tough to watch in LEGO form

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Gather ‘round, golf fans, for the saddest British Open story ever told–in LEGOs.

Maestro of the plastic medium, Jared Jacobs, worked his singular magic on Jean van de Velde’s notorious final-hole collapse at Carnoustie in 1999.

The interlocking plastic brick cinema begins after van de Velde’s approach shot has caromed off a grandstand railing to land on the opposite side of the Barry Burn.

 

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Sung Kang finally responds to cheating allegations

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Sorry to interrupt your regularly scheduled British Open programming, but Sung Kang stated today he still doesn’t think he didn’t anything wrong. “I followed the rules by the rules official…I think I did the right thing,” he said after his opening round at The Open.

Joel Dahmen, if you recall, accused the 31-year-old pro of taking a bad drop at the 10th hole during the final round of the Quicken Loans National.

The comments were Kang’s first public remarks since a statement co-released with the PGA Tour which said, “He is standing by the ruling that was made by PGA Tour Rules officials on Sunday and will have no further comment.”

While he stopped short of giving his side of the story, Kang did indeed make “further comment.”

Here’s some of what he said.

“I did not want to say anything bad about Joel. Because there can be difference of opinions. But the way he just said it on Twitter was not right. There can be different opinions. And also, it was made a decision by the rules official. So nothing was wrong.”

“I really want to say a lot of things about it, the truth about what happened, but no comment because I’m not going to say anything. I think I made the right decision. … Even when I say something, a few people still kind of think i still did something wrong. And if someone believes in me, they aren’t going to trust what Joel said.”

“No matter what I say, some people are going to trust it, some people are not going to trust it. And then I’m going to be thinking about it more and more. So I’m just focusing on my golf game.”

The British press asked Kang if he wishes he had done anything differently.

“No. Why? I did the right thing,” Kang replied.

Now, I’m not here to argue one way or the other, but the rules official wasn’t in position to do anything other than leave things at the player’s discretion, which he did. So, it’s misleading–if not downright deceptive–for Kang to suggest otherwise.

The official didn’t see the shot. There was no video of it. The only thing he had to rely on was the accounts of those who did see it. In a situation where accounts vary, and with the Rules of Golf relying on player integrity as they do, all he could do was leave the ball in Kang’s court. Thus, the decision as to where to drop was wholly Sung Kang’s.

Again, this isn’t to say the drop was necessarily bad, bad to play the “decision by the rules official” card is, well, a bad drop.

 

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