Connect with us

19th Hole

Tony Romo won an amateur event by 9 strokes. Does this matter?

Published

on

Sure, Tony Romo failed to qualify for the U.S. Open and finished last in his PGA Tour debut at the Corales Puntacana Resort & Club Championship recently, but things aren’t all bad for the CBS analyst and his golf game.

According to The Journal Times, No. 9 won the Racine Tri-Course Amateur Championship in Wisconsin by nine shots Sunday–the win was his second at the tournament, which he also won in 2004.

Romo lead by five strokes heading into the final round, which was contested at Meadowbrook Country Club, Romo’s home course (haters will be keen to point to this fact). Rounds one and two were held at Racine Country Club and H.F. Johnson Park Golf Course, respectively.

“I stayed aggressive,” Romo told The Journal Times. “I took mostly conservative lines and aggressive swings, and that’s the approach you take when you have a lead. When you’re hitting it as solid as I’ve been hitting it, you can trust it — commit to the swing and hit it.

Indeed! The Journal Times report also indicated Romo is working with Chris O’Connell and Andy Traynor from Plane Truth Golf and he feels the pieces are falling into place.

What this means for his future professional prospects is unclear, but a nine-stroke win in any event is a notable feat, right? Or not so much?

Let us know what you think, WRXers.

Your Reaction?
  • 36
  • LEGIT7
  • WOW2
  • LOL6
  • IDHT4
  • FLOP3
  • OB1
  • SHANK45

11 Comments

11 Comments

  1. Tartan Golf Travel

    Jul 11, 2018 at 2:01 am

    I agree with most. He’s a sold amateur. Most pros would give him at least 2-3 a side and beat him handily. Stick to amateur golf Tony.

  2. E

    Jul 11, 2018 at 12:19 am

    Stop hating, be happy for the guy

  3. Eric

    Jul 10, 2018 at 9:45 am

    He is a good amateur player. Nothing less and nothing more

    • Chris P.

      Jul 10, 2018 at 2:57 pm

      Perfectly stated. People who think Romo can make it on the PGA Tour simply don’t understand how wide the gap is between good amateurs and tour pros. They think it’s the distance from the Earth to the moon when it’s more like from the Earth to the Sun.

  4. Johnny Penso

    Jul 9, 2018 at 11:59 pm

    I just attended a Mackenzie Tour event here in Windsor, ON and watched a young kid named Mark Anguiano shoot the lights out at my 7000 yard links style course, shooting 24 under par. One of the guys chasing him, a Canadian named Taylor Pendrith, was driving the ball as much as 340 yards in the holes I followed him on. I’d say they have a far better chance of making the PGA Tour than Tony Romo.

  5. JB

    Jul 9, 2018 at 8:26 pm

    Tony is a nice guy and a very good golfer with a 0% chance of making a living on the pro tour. Still pretty cool story though!

  6. David

    Jul 9, 2018 at 7:05 pm

    That depends. What did he shoot? Even if the courses are easy, three straight rounds under par is a nice showing.

    • Jack

      Jul 9, 2018 at 8:23 pm

      68-71-69

      • Joe

        Jul 9, 2018 at 10:13 pm

        Definitely not a +5 which I’ve heard is the MINIMUM to consider teeing it up to make a payday….

  7. ChipNRun

    Jul 9, 2018 at 6:28 pm

    Let’s see… Former San Francisco QB John Brodie is the only NFL veteran to have won a pro golf tournament.

    [quote]”After retiring from the NFL, Brodie played from 1985-1998 on the Champions Tour, earning a dozen top-10 finishes and winning the 1991 Security Pacific Senior Classic by defeating George Archer and Chi Chi Rodriguez in a playoff. He suffered a serious stroke in 2000.”[/quote]
    http://www.usga.org/articles/2014/01/football-or-golf-john-brodie-didnt-have-to-choose-21474865804.html

    Brodie had significant experience with competitive golf (see article link for details):
    * Despite being Stanford University’s starting QB, he played two seasons of NCAA golf for his school. This meant he skipped spring practice for football.
    * Played in the 1959 and 1981 U.S. Opens, the longest recorded gap between appearances. (Got cut both times).
    * Upstart golf pro Jimmy Ballard – who originated The Connection teaching method – credits Brodie with introducing him to the idea of using video instant replay to analyze golf swings, just as the NFL teams used video tapes to analyze past games.

    So, can Tony Romo make it on the pro tour? That’s what everyone is asking. We’ll just have to wait and see. He would probably want to warm up for a season or two on Web.com tour, or something similar.

    • 3puttPar

      Jul 10, 2018 at 4:23 pm

      He wouldn’t make it through the qualifying stages to make the Web.Com Tour. Hes a solid amateur golfer, I don’t even think he’d make any money on something as simple as the Pepsi Tour or Dakotas Tour.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

19th Hole

What do we make of the Ian Poulter vs. marshal fiasco?

Published

on

Perhaps you’ve heard about Ian Poulter’s altercation with a marshal at the Scottish Open? (It was in the Morning 9!)

A first point: The marshal in question wasn’t some mere jabroni. In its discussion of the encounter, the Telegraph refers to Quintin Jardine as a “celebrated crime author.” Now, he’s not topping the bestseller lists here in the States, but he is an established author.

This, of course, could work either for or against Mr. Jardine. On the one hand, he’s a perceptive, articulate, respectable fellow. On the other, he has an incentive for self promotion to promote his works…“Did you like my Poulter blog post? You’ll love my latest novel!”

Anyway, here’s the sequence of events.

Jardine posted to his blog (and tweeted a link to) a work of original non-fiction: His account of a run-in with Ian Poulter while working as a Marshal during Saturday’s third round. Poulter had just pulled a drive into a bush near where Jardine was doing his duties.

His blog post read (he’s since deleted the post) in part:

“Mr Poulter…arrived in a shower of expletives and asked me where his ball was,” wrote Jardine. “I told him and said that I had not ventured into the bush for fear of standing on it. I wasn’t expecting thanks, but I wasn’t expecting aggression either.

“He told me in essence that I should have, his reasoning being that if I stood on the ball it was a free drop, whereas if he did it was a penalty… He (later) came back at me and said again that next time … I should go straight in there feet first.”

The implication, of course, is that Jardine believed Poulter was asking him to stomp around in the bush for the ball, suggesting that if he (the marshal) were to dislodge it, Poults would be entitled to a free drop.

This was not Poulter’s recollection of events, and he took to Twitter to respond, disputing the insinuation that he was trying to cheat and more.

A point of note: What Poulter said to Jardine at the time may be another issue, but he is correct in tweeting that if the ball was kicked or stepped on during he search, he’s entitled to replace it (per Rule 18-4), which is certainly not the same thing as a free drop. He would seem to be incorrect in saying he’d be penalized, however, as a search was underway…however, an overly zealous reading of the rule could have left Poulter in hot water, had he moved the ball, so it would have been an easier situation to deal with had a fan or marshal accidentally contacted the projectile.

The crime author deleted his original blog post and posted a follow up July 15 that says in part.

“Seems that Mr Poulter has disputed my account of our exchange yesterday. Now I’m having email abuse from pond life and bottom feeders. I don’t need that.”

“The only way I can get rid of it is by deleting the original post. In retrospect I should probably have kept the dispute private, but it’s out of the box now, and I must rely on the Tour to make a judgement.”

“Mr Poulter has gone public to his two million Twitter followers with his version of events. All I can say is that I stand by mine and at no time did I ever utter the words ‘OK thanks.’”

What do you think about this he-said, he-said, GolfWRX members?

Your Reaction?
  • 0
  • LEGIT1
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK0

Continue Reading

19th Hole

That’s one way to grow the game: First Nude Golf Day held in Australia

Published

on

Ready your shaft and balls jokes, golf fans, it’s time for the tale of the the first Wandering Bears Nude Golf Day at (you can’t make this stuff up) Humpty Doo Golf Club in Australia.

According to a Northern Territory News report, Bruce Jensen and Julie Jarvie of Brujul Nude Retreat organized the event. They agreed to steer clear of the seventh and eight holes because those are next to the clubhouse and, presumably, the membership loaned the course out to the nudists for the day but they didn’t particularly want to see a flesh parade while chowing down in the grill room.

The event attracted about 30 swingers of the golf club. Jensen promises there will be more golfers sans clothes at next year’s event.

And here are a couple of quotes from participants in the event, presented without comment because, well, what can you really say?

“There’s plenty of sun block. And the sausage sizzle got people going a bit.”

“Everything is swinging when you play golf nude.”

It’s unclear whether “sausage sizzle” was a literal or figurative term…

So, while some of us are bellyaching about the state of the game, Jensen, Jarvie, the Wandering Bears, and the Humpty Doo Golf Club are doing something about it…albeit something that 99.9 percent of golfers would never consider.

But seriously. Good on you, participants in/organizers of Nude Golf Day. We always talk about playing golf the way that suits you — nine holes, teeing it forward, on a simulator, etc. — and these folks are truly doing it.

What say you, GolfWRX members, anyone plan to wander fairways in the buff with the Wandering Bears next year?

(image c/o Clive Hyde)

Your Reaction?
  • 10
  • LEGIT2
  • WOW5
  • LOL7
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP5
  • OB3
  • SHANK31

Continue Reading

19th Hole

Rickie Fowler sings the praises of slow greens. What do you think?

Published

on

Following his opening-round 64 at the Aberdeen Standard Investments Scottish Open yesterday, Rickie Fowler had some interesting remarks about his enjoyment of slower greens.

Writing for Golfweek, Geoff Shackelford mentioned Guillane “is playing firm and fast tee-to-fringe, the greens themselves are kept much slower than the typical European Tour course due to the possibility of high winds.”

Rickie Fowler, a past winner of the tournament, suggested slower greens may actually show who the better putters are.

“I think it’s kind of nice because (you) actually get to hit the putt, you’re not just trying to hit it to a spot and letting it work to the hole unless you have a downhill, downwind putt,” he said. ‘“You have to use your imagination as far as creativity and trying to judge how much the wind will affect it. At the end of the day, you just have to hit solid putts.”’

“Slower greens may accentuate a mis-hit putt more. Whereas if you have a downhill putt in the States you kind of just have to hit it to get it going. Here, you mis-hit it a little bit uphill, into the wind and it can be a pretty big difference.”

While Shackelford, advocate for rolling back the ball and against “firm and fast” that he is, saw great important in Fowler’s remarks, he’s not at all wrong to highlight them

What do you think, GolfWRX members? Is it worth reading anything into Fowler’s remarks? Clearly, with current ball distances, pros would be shooting fish in a barrel with their approach shots on greens that stimp at nine or 10, right?

Let us know what you think!

Your Reaction?
  • 139
  • LEGIT18
  • WOW3
  • LOL0
  • IDHT2
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK4

Continue Reading

19th Hole

Facebook

Trending