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TG2: Is Tiger Woods really switching to a TaylorMade Ardmore 3 mallet putter?

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Is Tiger Woods really switching to a TaylorMade TP Black Copper Ardmore 3 mallet putter? And if so, why? Equipment expert Brian Knudson and Editor Andrew Tursky discuss their thoughts. They also investigate photos of the new Titleist TS2 and TS3 fairway woods, and why exactly Bryson DeChambeau was spotted using a compass.

Check out the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes!

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. William Davis

    Jul 5, 2018 at 2:40 pm

    Who cares anymore?

  2. gif

    Jun 26, 2018 at 7:46 pm

    if its good ennuf for Tiger its good ennuf fer me …. boooyah

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Equipment

Callaway redesigns Odyssey R-Ball Prototype using GE’s additive manufacturing

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Callaway has announced the company has signed a consultancy agreement with GE Additive’s AddWorks team, with the aim of improving its equipment through the potential of additive manufacturing. According to GE Additive’s website, additive manufacturing is a process that creates a physical object from digital design, enabling the creation of lighter, stronger parts and systems.

What does this mean for Callaway’s equipment?

The opening project from the agreement is a redesigned Odyssey R-Ball Prototype putter head. Callaway originally developed the Odyssey R-Ball Prototype as a tour preferred model in Japan, which consisted of removing the front ball from the original 2-ball design. Callaway, through additive manufacturing, has optimized the acoustics of the putter while retaining the preferred shape and performance.

 

Brad Rice, director – R&D, Advanced Engineering at Callaway, speaking about the process, stressed that the use of additive manufacturing is the future to the production of equipment in the game of golf, stating

“Additive manufacturing is a new tool; which is quickly going beyond the aspirational phase, and into the functionalization phase of the technology. Callaway needs to learn how to use this tool well because it is inevitable that 3D-Printing of production parts is going to happen – it is the production method of the future.”

So just how has Callaway and GE Additive collaborated to create the ideal acoustics on the Odyssey R-Ball Prototype putter head? Well, the answer is by adding geometry that made it difficult for conventional casting methods, which you can get a feel for in this short video.

For the Odyssey Prototype putter to retain its optimal design and shape while altering the acoustic signature of the putter head, Callaway and GE Additive’s AddWorks’ design and engineering teams implemented additive manufacturing through the following process:

  •  AddWorks provided guidance to Callaway, based on decades of additive design background spanning several industries.
  •  The team refined existing designs to the build direction to ensure all features were self-supported or easily supported during the build. The AddWorks team designed supports for thermal stresses and overhang constraints.
  •  Topology optimization was used in conjunction with acoustical mapping to create the optimal design.

According to GE Additive AddWorks general manager, Chris Schuppe, additive manufacturing is a method which we are going to be hearing of a lot down the line, and he is expecting this to be the first of many collaborations with Callaway

“We’re taking away many new learnings from our first project together, especially around aesthetics. We have also used additive technology to create an acoustic map, which is certainly a first for us. We’re looking forward to driving more successful projects with Callaway, as they continue their additive journey.”

What the future holds for Callaway’s products through the use of additive manufacturing remains to be seen. However, the company’s bold stance on the potential of the process enhancing their equipment could be telling.

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Equipment

Forum Thread of the Day: “Oldest club that you game?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from uwhockey14, who asks fellow GolfWRX members for the oldest club that they still use out on the course. Despite the latest technologies continually leading to new and improved equipment, this thread shows that for many of our members, there will always be a place in the bag for that certain trusty older club.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • leo the lion: “Odyssey Dual Force 56 degree wedge which is about 20 years old. These wedges have what I believe are called Stronomic inserts in the face. The inserts are made of a very hard material and still look new. I have not found a wedge that gives more spin and control than these wedges. Ping Eye and ISI’s come close but the Dual Forces can almost stop on a dime. I also have a 52 degree that I will use together with the 56 on shorter courses.”
  • NRJyzr: “Playing Golden Ram Tour Grinds right now, they’re approximately 38 years old.”
  • Moonlightgrm: “My Ping ISI irons are 18-years old. Nothing can move them out of my bag. Easy to hit and very forgiving. I tried a set of Mizuno JPX900 forged this year, and they lasted exactly 3-rounds.”
  • sneaky_pete: “18* Mizuno Fli Hi II Driving Iron from around 2006/2007.  This will never leave the bag! Also still rocking my Adams Speedline Super S 3 wood from 2012.”
  • dpb5031: “Arnold Palmer AP30r blade putter – ~50 years old. Kasco K2K #33 (sorta between a 2 hybrid & 5 wood) – 18 years old.”

Entire Thread: “Oldest club that you game?”

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Equipment

Wilson Staff Cortex wins “Driver vs. Driver 2” (in-hand photos)

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Designed by show contestant Evan Hoffman of San Diego, California, the Wilson Staff Cortex is the winning driver design of the second season of Driver vs. Driver.

The titanium-bodied Cortex features carbon panels and a sliding adjustable weight system.

Additional Cortex features

Fast Cage Technology — The company describes this as, a “weight-tuned titanium internal structure with an impressive 44% of its surface area covered in Carbon Fiber Panels. This Ti –Carbon construction allows for extremely precise distribution of weight and frees up additional weight for maximum adjustability.”

Wilson’s longest ever Slide Track — An eight gram sliding adjustable weight is positioned in the center of the head. Additionally interchangeable two and eight-gram weights can be adjusted on the sole and heel of the club.

Fast Fit Technology hosel system — Players have six adjustable options to dial in the loft of the driver in half-degree increments.

A Fujikura ATMOS Tour Spec shaft — red, blue, or black — is standard.

“Season Two of the show yielded two amazing finalists; the Cortex and the Rozwell,”
said Tim Clarke, President of Wilson Golf. “Ulimately, the Cortex came out on top with
its clean, classic shape, overall consistent performance results from a wide range of
player testers, and steady sound across the entire face of the club. We are excited to get
this driver into the hands of players at all levels of the game.”

Hoffman presented his original concept to Wilson LABS, and the engineers chose if from hundreds of submissions. After a nearly two-year process of refining, Hoffman is the winner of a $250,000 grand prize and the inclusion of his creation in the Wilson Staff Line.

The Wilson Staff Cortex will retail for $499.99 and will be available in 9-, 10.5-, and 12-degree models.

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