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19th Hole

POLL: Backstopping on the PGA Tour: Big deal or who cares?

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Fueled by Jimmy Walker’s statement-of-the-obvious tweets the other day, backstopping is once again a topic of discussion in the world of golf.

If you’re unaware what backstopping is, well, for one thing, you can thank Geoff Shackelford for coming up with the term (Thanks, Geoff). With respect to a definition, Jason Day explained it pretty well to Golf.com’s Michael Bamberger.

“Backstopping is when you and your playing partner are off the green and you chip up and don’t mark your ball and he chips and hits the ball, which causes him to be closer to the hole than he was going to be.”

For reference, the Walker tweet in question read

“If you don’t like a guy you will mark anyway…If you like the guy you might leave it to help on a shot. Some guys don’t want to give help at all and rush to mark their ball. To each his own.”

Now, before digging any deeper, it’s important to remember that backstopping, when done deliberately, is quite illegal. Rule 22 of the Rules of Golf states, “In stroke play, if the committee determines that competitors have agreed not to lift a ball that might assist any competitor, they are disqualified.”

Of course, determining that “competitors have agreed,” would always be difficult, but still…

Plenty of folks are fired up about players helping players: Curtis Strange, and Paul Azinger in particular. Jason Day and Dustin Johnson have both made remarks opposing the practice recently.

Rather than cataloguing the responses, we want to know what the GolfWRX membership thinks. Assuming backstopping is commonly practiced on Tour, what are your thoughts?

Is backstopping in professional golf a big deal?

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Feel free to elaborate on your vote in the comments!

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16 Comments

16 Comments

  1. ewfnick

    Jun 14, 2018 at 4:57 pm

    Is this worse than crushing a tee shot into the gallery and not shouting fore?

  2. Matt

    Jun 14, 2018 at 1:42 pm

    If a guy was able to reliably hit a shot into another ball, would he not just take that extraordinary accuracy and hit the hole instead?

  3. thebigdad

    Jun 14, 2018 at 11:56 am

    #markthedamnedball

  4. James T

    Jun 14, 2018 at 11:43 am

    The intent of the rule is that your shot is your shot, dependent on your skill. Not a wayward shot saved by a ball/backstop. Always mark within 20 yards. No wink and a nod.

  5. Murica

    Jun 14, 2018 at 1:30 am

    People suck. People don’t want to play by the rules. People don’t want to obey the law. America the great.

  6. john

    Jun 13, 2018 at 10:42 pm

    It’s a rule and pros need to follow the rules. So either DQ them or get rid of the rule. This should be followed in all competition play.

    For the weekend golfer, it’s a moot point since most rules are more like guidelines.

  7. MikeyB

    Jun 13, 2018 at 10:40 pm

    I don’t see how this can be a ‘thing’ in professional golf with so many rules junkies in the gallery. How often do we see ‘chipped’ balls making contact anyway? Yes, we do see approach shots from say 125+ yards occasionally roll out and make contact. No one however is running in from 175 yards to mark a ball before the opponent takes his turn.

    Quite frankly this sounds like a non-issue. Announcers always make a point of saying that when the balls make contact someone will have to try and figure out as best they can where the balls should be placed before being putted.

  8. DJ May

    Jun 13, 2018 at 8:58 pm

    Hey PGA…let’s do something about slow play. Watching Pat “happy feet” Cantlay at the Memorial was outrageous. Give them shot link numbers to the pin when they approach their ball, throw some grass in the air if needed, consult yardage book for danger areas on green ect…and hit the ball

  9. Tommy

    Jun 13, 2018 at 8:40 pm

    When I’m ready to play, it’s a pain for my near cripple playing partner to make it to the green to mark when I’m ready to play. If he asks, I’ll say “no”, I’m ready to play. I’ve already been waiting for you to hit it…there. I think it’s not much of an issue except in rare instances…those should stop and I’m sure it will after this hiccup.

  10. Matt

    Jun 13, 2018 at 8:15 pm

    Might as well add a 3 foot circle around the hole and just give a gimme. They’re only making millions upon millions of dollars who needs to play fair. They should change it to if it’s not marked and just sitting there then it can not be moved back because it was a backstop. If people are worried about pace of play because of marking a ball they don’t know Speith being slow on every shot with multiple times taking over a half hour between shots.

  11. JThunder

    Jun 13, 2018 at 7:41 pm

    A golf ball is a smaller target than the hole. If you’re not able to hit the hole with your chip, then it’s unlikely you can aim at the ball as a backstop. It will happen, but you could argue the chances are fairly slim.

    I believe this has become common because pros would rather spend their time reading putts and working with their caddies rather than running around marking balls. Wasn’t there a time when balls weren’t marked and stymies, etc?

    Anyway – whatever the decision is, just keep the pace of play improving. We certainly don’t need anything to further slow down the pro game.

  12. faq

    Jun 13, 2018 at 4:38 pm

    ‘backstopping’ sounds fallacious… (_*_)

  13. Nathan

    Jun 13, 2018 at 4:29 pm

    On the PGA tour I wouldn’t mind them marking the ball (they have a caddie to help speed play), but again if you enforce this to everyone on a local level it will be a slow day of golf. Most people are thinking about their shot and not about a backstop. However, I think if a competitor asks you to mark, you mark (courtesy). If someone who just hit is asking you about marking they are generally asking if they need to rush up there to mark. This is usually my way of saying I’d rather not rush up there, but I will if you want me to. If I knew it was going to be a competitive advantage against me, I’d always mark. I do not believe you get a lot of intentional backstopping. It is really up to the player who has the ball near to hole to determine the outcome.

    • MattD

      Jun 13, 2018 at 6:43 pm

      If a ball is sitting near the hole and the player who hit it says “do you want me to mark that” and you say “no”, the two of you have agreed to leave a ball in place that will give you an advantage and that’s a breach of Rule 22.

  14. kevin

    Jun 13, 2018 at 4:22 pm

    i’m not surprised so many don’t care either way, but i’m willing to bet some of those would at least like to see the rule clarified so all players on treating each situation the same. get everyone on the same page whatever that may be. as it is now, some ignore the rule, some use it to help others, and other players follow the rule as its intended. the problem with the rule is its vague and hard to prove intent.

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19th Hole

The 6 best #GolfWRX photos on Instagram today (10.15.19)

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In this segment, we’ll be taking a look at some of the best #GolfWRX tagged photos on Instagram. In case you aren’t already, there’s a whole load of action going on at our page, so follow us: @golfwrx

Let’s get to it then, here are six of the best #GolfWRX photos from the past 24 hours.

Dropping this Wednesday from Sugar Skull Golf.

Behind the scenes with Cushman Custom Golf.

Yutaka Kawanami showcasing Fuji Course, Kawana Hotel Golf Course in Japan.

New from Wilson Golf.

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A new classic.

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“Sprinkle, Sprinkle” from Tyson Lamb.

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Sprinkle sprinkle #LambCrafted

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New creation from National Custom Works.

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Working on the night moves

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Get hashtagging your golf posts #GolfWRX for your chance to feature in our best of Instagram posts in the future!

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19th Hole

Back: Tiger Woods’ first-ever memoir coming to retail

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Tiger Woods’ memoir, “Back,” will be coming to worldwide retail after HarperCollins Publishers today announced that they had acquired the rights to the book.

“Back” will be the first-ever memoir authored by Tiger Woods, and according to a statement published on the 15-time-major champion’s website, the memoir is “a candid and intimate narrative of an outsize American life.”

The first and only account directly from Woods, with the full cooperation of his friends, family, and inner circle, “Back” covers Woods’ life from his growing up a celebrated golf prodigy through to his stunning 2019 Masters victory.

Speaking on the upcoming release of his memoir, Woods stated

 “I’ve been in the spotlight for a long time, and because of that, there have been books and articles and TV shows about me, most filled with errors, speculative and wrong. This book is my definitive story. 

“It’s in my words and expresses my thoughts. It describes how I feel and what’s happened in my life. I’ve been working at it steadily, and I’m looking forward to continuing the process and creating a book that people will want to read.”

President and Publisher of HarperOne Group, Judith Curr, had this to say on acquiring the publishing rights to “Back”

“We are thrilled and proud to work with Tiger on what I believe will be the publishing event of the decade. Tiger will reclaim his own story and legacy and it’s a story for the world over.”

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19th Hole

Jesper Parnevik handed a two-stroke penalty at the SAS Championship for NOT taking a mulligan

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At the SAS Championship on Sunday, Jesper Parnevik was handed a two-stroke penalty when he didn’t take a mulligan.

The incident occurred on the third hole of Parnevik’s final round, where according to Reuters, the Swede horseshoed a short bogey putt which came back and struck his foot. The veteran then tapped in for what he thought was a double-bogey, unaware that because the ball had accidentally struck him, he was required to take a mulligan. 

Speaking to Reuters, rules official, Brian Claar said

“When a ball on the putting green accidentally hits any person, animal or immovable obstruction, this stroke does not count and the ball must be replaced on its original spot.

Jesper tapped it in. In that situation he’s played from the wrong place. Unfortunately he gets a two-stroke penalty for playing from the wrong place, and the one where he tapped in counts but the original stroke does not count.”

If the situation sounds perplexing to you, then you aren’t alone.

According to Claar, when he called the USGA for assistance, the governing body asked him “Did that really happen out there?”, before adding that they had never heard of an incident like it occurring before in tournament play. 

Here is the rule which undid Parnevik explained:

Rule 11.1.b, Exception 2:

When Ball Played from Putting Green Accidentally Hits Any Person, Animal or Movable Obstruction (Including Another Ball in Motion) on Putting Green: The stroke does not count and the original ball or another ball must be replaced on its original spot (which if not known must be estimated).

Parnevik ended up making a triple-bogey on the hole and finished the event in a tie for 68th place.

 

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