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The Florida Mid-Am final ended with a player getting punched in the face. Or did it?

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On paper–that is the Florida State Golf Association’s paper, not the police report–Marc Dull won the Florida Mid-Am when his opponent, Jeff Golden, withdrew.

Dull had just birdied the 16th hole to pull even, when the skies opened.

A FSGA statement on the final match indicates what happened next

“With the players on 17, play was halted by heavy rains. When conditions permitted play to continue nearly two and a half hours later, Golden was unable to continue due to an unfortunate injury and defaulted the match.”

Indeed, the statement is technically correct. However, it hardly tells the full story…and what a story it is.

Golf Channel’s Ryan Lavner did some digging into the “unfortunate injury,” and what he found was certainly surprising.

Per a Charlotte County Sheriff’s Office police report, Jeff Golden (the man who suffered the “unfortunate injury”) called police. Golden claimed he was assaulted in the Coral Creek Club parking lot by his opponent’s caddie. According to Golden, Dull’s caddie, Brandon Hibbs, punched him in the face.

Why in the world did this happen? Apparently, during the ninth hole of the Golden-Dull match, Golden asked Dull about the condition of one of the holes, inquiring as to whether the cup was damaged.

“Don’t worry about it,” Hibbs (again, this is Dull’s caddie) told Golden. “If you’re going to make it, you’re going around it.”

Following this, Golden told a rules official that he believed the caddie’s statement constituted advice (to Golden, who was not his player). Apparently/incredibly, the rules official agreed, and Golden was awarded the hole.

Hibbs, presumably furious, left the course at this point and returned to the clubhouse.

During the previously mentioned rain delay that interrupted the match, Golden claims Hibbs approached him in the parking lot while he was at his car getting additional clothing.

Per the report, Hibbs “approached him, apologized, then punched him on the left side of the face.”

Now this story would be ridiculous enough if these facts were agreed upon. However, Hibbs says the incident never happened. He claims after leaving the course, he was in the clubhouse during the entire rain delay.

Nobody saw the alleged attack, and there were no surveillance cameras trained on the parking lot. Further, Golden’s face was not swollen or cut and Hibbs’ hands showed no evidence that he’d punched anything.

Golden maintains he was punched and that his shirt had blood on it, also claiming that he suffered “concussion symptoms.”

Golden declined to press charges, and both Hibbs and Dull maintain nothing happened.

Per Ryan Lavner, FSGA executive director Jim Demick said that Golden “didn’t want to play anymore.”

“Regrettably, the golf course was very playable and Jeff understood that he needed to resume the match. I think he was just ready to go,” adding police “found absolutely no evidence of an assault.”

What do you make of this, GolfWRX members? The scales of justice don’t seem to be tipped in Mr. Golden’s favor, do they?

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6 Comments

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  1. bjb

    May 22, 2018 at 1:17 am

    no marks on the face, no marks on the hand…and where would the blood on the shirt have come from? My guess is a McDonald’s ketchup packet. what a dumba$$

  2. Dave r

    May 21, 2018 at 9:05 pm

    Full contact golf gotta love it.

  3. Draw down

    May 21, 2018 at 2:11 pm

    Didn’t this guy used to caddie for Robert Allenby?

  4. Jack Nash

    May 21, 2018 at 1:00 pm

    Just when you think you’ve seen or heard everything…….

  5. Dan

    May 21, 2018 at 12:49 pm

    What ignorant comments

  6. Sr

    May 21, 2018 at 12:43 pm

    Well, it’s Florida. What do you expect from a bunch of silly rednecks

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19th Hole

Tiger at the Masters: The 3 that got away

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This time last year, Tiger Woods earned his fifth green jacket at the 2019 Masters, breaking a 14-year drought at Augusta National and completing a storybook career comeback (see Tiger Woods’ 2019 Masters WITB here).

Between his 2005 and 2019 victories, Woods gave himself several chances to reclaim the green jacket, but for one reason or another, the championship continuously eluded the 15-time major winner.

Looking back on that drought, three years in particular stick out in my mind where Woods (being the ruthless closer that he is) could, and maybe should, have capitalized on massive opportunities.

2007 Masters

A unique tournament broke out at the 2007 Masters with chilly and windy conditions meaning we would see an over-par score winning the event for the first time in a generation.

Unusually however was the fact that Tiger Woods had got himself into a fantastic position heading into the final day’s play—one stroke back of the lead and in the final group.

By the first hole on Sunday, Woods had a share of the lead. A couple of holes later, and he was the sole leader. But instead of the game’s greatest ever closer doing what he does best, we saw the first small chink in Tiger’s major armor.

Unable to keep up with the improved scoring on Sunday, Woods finished the championship two strokes behind Zach Johnson. It was the first time Woods lost a major in which he held the lead at some point in the final round.

11th hole Sunday. Woods saved par.

Summing up after the round why things hadn’t turned out the way the entire golf world expected, Woods said

“Looking back over the week I basically blew this tournament with two rounds where I had bogey, bogey finishes. That’s 4-over in two holes. The last two holes, you just can’t afford to do that and win major championships.”

2011 Masters

In one of the most exciting final rounds in Masters history, an electric front-nine charge from Woods coupled with a Rory McIlroy collapse saw the then 35-year-old tied for the lead heading into the back nine.

After back-to-back pars on the challenging 10th and 11th holes, Woods found the green on the 12th before it all slipped away. A disastrous three-putt was followed by a deflating five on the par-5 13th and an agonizing near-miss for birdie on 14.

In typical defiant fashion, Woods then flushed a long iron on the par-5 15th to give him five feet for eagle and what would have been the outright lead. But he couldn’t find the cup.

Directly following his round, a visibly miffed Woods said

“I should have shot an easy 3- or 4-under on the back nine and I only posted even. But I’m right there in the thick of it and a bunch of guys have a chance. We’ll see what happens.”

What happened was eventual champion Charl Schwartzel did what Woods said he should have done—shooting 4 under on the back to win his first major.

2013 Masters

Luck, or lack of, is a contentious topic when it comes to sports fans, but at the 2013 Masters, Woods’ shocking fate played out as if those on Mount Olympus were orchestrating the tournament.

Woods entered the 2013 Masters as the World Number One, brimming with confidence having won three out of his first five tournaments to start the year.

By Friday afternoon, Woods had cruised into a share of the lead, before crisply striking a wedge on the par-5 15th as he hunted for another birdie.

In a cruel twist of fate, Woods’ ball struck the pin and ricocheted back into the water. “Royally cheated!” shouted on-course announcer David Feherty. Nobody could argue otherwise.

A subsequent “bad drop” turned a probable birdie into a triple-bogey placing Woods behind the proverbial 8-ball for the rest of the tournament. The game’s ultimate closer should have been in the lead with two rounds to play on a front-runner’s paradise of a course; instead, he was in chase-mode. (From 1991-2012, 19 of the 22 winners came from the final group).

Woods tried to rally over the weekend, but if he didn’t think the 2013 Masters was ill-fated for himself by Friday evening, then he would have been excused to do so on the eighth hole on Saturday.

 

Had Woods’ golf ball missed the pin at 15 on that hot and humid Spring afternoon in 2013, then he not only wins, but he likely wins going away.

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19th Hole

The 6 best #GolfWRX photos on Instagram today (4.7.20)

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In this segment, we’ll be taking a look at some of the best #GolfWRX tagged photos on Instagram. In case you aren’t already, there’s a whole load of action going on at our page, so follow us: @golfwrx

Let’s get to it then, here are six of the best #GolfWRX photos from the past 24 hours.

“Flow inspired” from Goodwood.

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Flow inspired. ????

A post shared by Goodwood Golf Co. (@goodwoodgolfco) on

Awesome Tiger King giveaway from Rawhide Golf.

Beautiful looking work on this flat-stick from The Golf Garage.

Pre-orders now available on Bettinardi’s Queen B 6 SBS.

Frank mallet covers from MSquare Design.

Masters themed copper plated Studio Design 2 from Embrace Putters.

Get hashtagging your golf posts #GolfWRX for your chance to feature in our best of Instagram posts in the future!

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19th Hole

All the details of the Masters coverage being broadcast this week

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The 2020 Masters may be postponed until November, but during what was initially scheduled to be ‘Masters week’ there’s still plenty of ways for you to get your fix from the iconic championship.

Full final-round coverage of both Tiger Woods’ 2019 victory and Phil Mickelson’s 2004 triumph are just two of the highlights you can look forward to this weekend, with a bundle of action being showcased across different networks.

Here’s a full rundown of the coverage various networks are putting on this week.

*All times ET*

Golf Channel

Monday:

  • 2:30PM: 1960 Masters highlights, Arnold Palmer
  • 4:30PM: 1962 Masters highlights, Arnold Palmer
  • 6:30PM: 1964 Masters highlights, Arnold Palmer
  • 8PM: Celebrating the Masters

Tuesday:

  • 2:30PM: 1974 Masters highlights, Gary Player
  • 6:30PM: 1978 Masters highlights, Gary Player
  • 8PM: Celebrating the Masters

Wednesday:

  • 10AM: 1968 Masters highlights, Bob Goalby
  • 12:15PM: 1970 Masters highlights, Billy Casper
  • 6:15PM: 1986 winner’s news conference, Jack Nicklaus

Thursday:

  • 10:30AM: 1987 Masters highlights, Larry Mize
  • 12PM: 1977 Masters highlights, Tom Watson
  • 1.30PM: 1981 Masters highlights, Tom Watson
  • 4.30PM: 1962 Masters highlights, Arnold Palmer
  • 6.30PM: 1964 Masters highlights, Arnold Palmer
  • 7:30PM: 2012 winner’s news conference, Bubba Watson 
  • 11PM: 1997 winner’s news conference, Tiger Woods

Friday: 

  • 10AM: 1980 Masters highlights, Seve Ballesteros
  • 11:30AM: 1983 Masters highlights, Seve Ballesteros
  • 6PM: 2013 winner’s news conference, Adam Scott
  • 11PM: 2005 winner’s news conference, Tiger Woods

Saturday: 

  • 9:30AM: 1989 Masters highlights, Nick Faldo 
  • 1:30PM: 1986 Masters highlights, Jack Nicklaus
  • 6pm: 2004 winner’s news conference, Phil Mickelson

Sunday:

  • 6PM: 2019 Live From the Masters

CBS

Saturday:

  • 1:30PM: 1975 final-round highlights, Jack Nicklaus 
  • 2004 final round, Phil Mickelson 

Sunday:

  • 12:30PM: 2019 final round, Tiger Woods 

ESPN

Thursday:

  • 3PM: 2012 final round, Bubba Watson
  • 7:30PM: 1997 final round, Tiger Woods 

Friday: 

  • 12PM: 2013 final round, Adam Scott
  • 6PM: 2005 final round, Tiger Woods

All final round broadcasts from 1968 through 2019 are also available to watch now in their entirety on The Masters YouTube channel.

 

 

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