Connect with us

19th Hole

First-round Wells Fargo Championship leader, John Peterson is ready to retire

Published

on

Order the cake. You can start planning John Peterson’s retirement party. Maybe.

What? Why is the 29-year-old former all-American at LSU ready to walk away from the game?

Peterson, who opened the Wells Fargo Championship with a 6-under 65, is playing on a major medical extension. Earlier this year, he said he was considering retiring, should he not clear he earnings hurdle to retain his status.

Leading the Wells Fargo at the first round, Peterson is still of the same mind.

“I’m kind of freewheeling it at this point…I know a little bit has been said about me retiring if I don’t make the necessary money for my medical starts, and all that’s true. If I don’t make it, I’m not playing golf anymore.”

He says the Tour life simply isn’t for him.

“I just don’t enjoy the travel out here very much,” he explained. “I don’t like it at all, honestly. … Don’t get me wrong, I don’t hate it out here. They treat you great every week. You have nothing to worry about. I like it a lot out here. I just kind of want to be a dad and like be around my kid and my family more often, even though, yeah, they’re here this week, but they can’t come every week. Thirty-five weeks on the road a year or so? It’s just not for me.”

Peterson is keen to spend more time with his wife and child in Texas.

“They want to see more of me around Fort Worth, I want to see more of them. It’s a great life out here. It’s a great life out here, if you like the lifestyle.”

Clearly, Peterson does not.

In his next three events, Peterson needs either 237 FedExCup points or $318,096 to retain his card. A two-way tie for second or a three way tie for fourth or better would get Peterson to that point.

While it might not seem like he particularly wants that outcome, Peterson insists he’s going to do everything he can to win the tournament.

“But if it doesn’t happen – whatever, you know? I’ve got everything in place. Either way is fine with me,” he says.

Is JP onto something? Plenty of self-help gurus espouse the virtues of “detaching from outcomes” and the benefits of playing loose and carefree.

While the Tour life is much more lucrative than it once was, and much less of a grind than it was in the days when the boys were driving from tournament to tournament on provincial highways in beat up Buicks, it’s a grind nevertheless.

What do you think about his attitude, GolfWRX members?

Your Reaction?
  • 33
  • LEGIT4
  • WOW0
  • LOL1
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK8

2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. 3PuttPar

    May 4, 2018 at 11:51 am

    Understandably, the life style isn’t for everyone. But there’s a lot of guys out there that love the life style and are doing everything they can to earn it.

    If I had to guess right now, I don’t think JP will keep his card. The Tour is too competitive to go at tournaments / the life style half-hearted and expect to keep your card. There are guys on the Web and other mini tours grinding for their chance.

    If you’re not in 110% JP, step aside for the guys who would do anything to make your card theirs.

  2. alexdub

    May 4, 2018 at 11:16 am

    Treading water in life is tough. Although it’s hard for us to understand why someone would want to leave the Tour — having a little boy myself, I can see why he would want to get off the treadmill and be at home more with his family.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

19th Hole

Hungover Eddie Pepperell is the real winner of The Open

Published

on

Eddie Pepperell is never dull. The Englishman’s candor, articulateness, and skill with a pen make him a great follow on Twitter and beyond.

But even given standard Peperellian forthrightness, it was surprising to hear this: Pepperell was hungover during the final round at Carnoustie…a round in which he fired a 4-under 67.

Pepperell finished tied for sixth at 5-under, three strokes behind Francesco Molinari, and he offered this admission in his final-round press conference.

“I was a little hungover…I had too much to drink last night. And I was so frustrated yesterday, that today was really, I wouldn’t say a write-off, but I didn’t feel I was in the golf tournament. Whether I shot 69 or 73 today, it wouldn’t have been heartbreaking. But as it happens, I shot 67. So, you know, it’s a funny game.”

Hitting the course before the winds kicked up, Pepperell birdied the third, fifth, sixth, and 14th holes before rolling in another at the 17th.

He clarified that he’s no wino.

“Listen, I wouldn’t always have a drink the night before. Sometimes I have a few drinks. Tiger is minus-7, he didn’t have a drink last night, I bet. Proper athlete…I didn’t really have that much to drink, just I’m a lightweight, yeah.”

Pepperell clarified that he felt okay this morning, but woke up in the middle of the night feeling poorly. he said. Then it was time to sit back and watch as the leaders battled Carnoustie’s back nine.

Proper athlete or no, Pepperell finished tied with Woods at 5 under.

Your Reaction?
  • 25
  • LEGIT1
  • WOW1
  • LOL3
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK2

Continue Reading

19th Hole

Pat Perez: The R&A “do it right, not like the USGA”

Published

on

Pat Perez opened The Open, as it were, with a 2-under 69, and at the time of this writing, he’s 4 under for the second round and tied for the lead.

Clearly, there’s something Double P likes about links golf. And when he was asked whether he was surprised by how receptive the greens at Carnoustie were after his opening round, Perez shook his head with conviction and said.

“They (the R&A) do it right, not like the USGA…They’ve got the opposite [philosophy] here. I told them, you guys have it right, let the course get baked, but you’ve got the greens receptive. They’re not going to run and be out of control. They could have easily had the greens just like the fairway, but they didn’t. The course is just set up perfect.”

“The U.S. Open could have been like this more if they wanted to. They could have made the greens a bit more receptive,” Perez said. “These greens are really flat compared to Shinnecock. So that was kind of the problem there is they let it get out of control and they made the greens too hard.”

Pat Perez has no problem speaking his mind. While it has gotten him in trouble in the past, you have to respect his candor. The interesting question, as I asked in the Morning 9, is how many Tour pros agree him?

Sure, it’s unlikely any of Perez’s compatriots will join him publicly in his “R&A does it right, USGA does it wrong” stance, but it’d be very interesting to know what percentage are of the same mind.

Your Reaction?
  • 188
  • LEGIT16
  • WOW4
  • LOL4
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP1
  • OB0
  • SHANK4

Continue Reading

19th Hole

68 at the British Open in the morning, golf with hickories at St Andrews in the afternoon

Published

on

Yes, golf fans, just another day in the charmed life (or week, at least) of one Brandon Stone.

Stoney (as I assume his friends call him), came to Carnoustie on the heels of a final-round 60 to win the Scottish Open. All he did in his opening round was fire a 3-under 68. Not bad!

But his Thursday to remember was only getting started as Stone made the 25-mile trip south to the Old Course to peg it…with a set of hickory clubs! Well played, sir, well played.

Your Reaction?
  • 24
  • LEGIT1
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK5

Continue Reading

19th Hole

Facebook

Trending