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POLL: It seems like Tour players like non-traditional events. Do fans?

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This week, the PGA Tour heads to the revamped Zurich Classic for the second year of the two-man team competition. Tournament organizers continue to refine the format (adding walk-up music this year!), but players are embracing the competition…perhaps to a surprising degree.

Golf Channel’s Ryan Lavner addressed this

“PGA Tour players are trying to tell commissioner Jay Monahan something: They like new…In the second year of the two-man team format at the Zurich Classic, 10 of the top 14 players in the world have signed up, including all four reigning major champions…Sure, some sponsor obligations are involved in boosting the field here, but there’s no other way to look at this: Today’s PGA Tour players are not only willing to play events that are a departure from the 72-hole, stroke-play norm. They’re encouraging it.”

Before discussing the merits of Lavner’s claim, let’s look at the field from the European Tour’s GolfSixes event to see who shows up for that tournament.

Here’s what last year’s field looked like

1. ENGLAND: Chris Wood, Andy Sullivan
2. THAILAND: Thongchai Jaidee, Kiradech Aphibarnrat
3. AUSTRALIA: Sam Brazel, Scott Hend
4. SOUTH AFRICA: Darren Fichardt, Brandon Stone
5. DENMARK: Thorbjørn Olesen, Lucas Bjerregaard
6. FRANCE: Alexander Levy, Grégory Bourdy
7. SPAIN: Pablo Larrazábal, Jorge Campillo
8. WALES: Bradley Dredge, Jamie Donaldson
9. USA: Paul Peterson, David Lipsky
10. NETHERLANDS; Joost Luiten, Reinier Saxton
11. BELGIUM: Nicolas Colsaerts, Thomas Detry
12. SWEDEN: Johan Carlsson,Joakim Lagergren
13. INDIA: S.S.P Chawrasia, Chikkarangappa S
14. PORTUGAL: Ricardo Gouveia, José-Filipe Lima
15. ITALY: Matteo Manassero, Renato Paratore
16. SCOTLAND: Richie Ramsay, Marc Warren

Neither Chris Wood nor Andy Sullivan are among the 10 best English golfers. Although, the top six play primarily on the PGA Tour. Looking through the rest of the teams, however, several countries’ top players turned up. Saying the top players on the European Tour were showing up en masse last year would be inappropriate, but clearly the event was embraced (and is returning this year).

So, let’s ourselves embrace the idea that players (at least some/enough players) like non-traditional events. Whether they want to see more of them is another question, and one which we don’t have data on.

We can, however, compile some data on what the fans think and whether they want to see more non-traditional tournaments, and that’s where you come in GolfWRX members. Let us know by responding to the polls below, we’ll be sure to share your results with the PGA and European Tours!

Do you like watching non-tradition Tour events? (such as the Zurich Classic, GolfSixes)

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Would you like more non-traditional events on the Tour schedule?

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6 Comments

6 Comments

  1. SV

    Apr 24, 2018 at 8:55 am

    “Non-traditional” events go back a long ways on the PGA Tour; Miami Four Ball, Haig & Haig and others. It depends on the sponsors feeling they are getting their money’s worth of exposure and attendance. Based on past history it seems the sponsors feel they get more from 72 hole stroke play events. Non-traditional events come and go because people tire of them.

  2. Radim Pavlicek

    Apr 24, 2018 at 2:51 am

    Ryder cup is awesome.

    • Acemandrake

      Apr 24, 2018 at 11:18 am

      …and the President’s Cup isn’t.

  3. Caroline

    Apr 23, 2018 at 7:28 pm

    They all forget to add “as long as the pay is there” a good share of these non-traditional events have no cuts so caddie and player are getting a pay day for sure….

  4. Blake

    Apr 23, 2018 at 4:47 pm

    The field is what i care about.

  5. Aaron

    Apr 23, 2018 at 3:51 pm

    I still miss The International at Castle Pines. Great golf course, great field, and great milk shakes. It could be the coolest format ever, but if players don’t show up, the event loses it’s luster.

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19th Hole

Ricky Barnes DQd at the Byron Nelson

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Ricky Barnes took a trip to Dairy Queen at the AT&T Byron Nelson. Barnes was disqualified following his second round 1-over 72. He signed for a three at the par-4 sixth hole, when in fact he had made a par.

Ultimately, he won’t rue his impromptu trip to get a Blizzard: Barnes was 3 over and was in no danger of making the cut.

Because this is the world we live in, Barnes apparently found out about the DQ via LuckyTrout Golf Pool on Twitter.

Of course, no scorecard error will ever top “What a stupid I am,” Roberto De Vicenzo signing for 66 when he shot 65, handing the green jacket to Bob Goalby at the 1968 Masters. Such an unfortunate legacy for a man who won hundreds of tournaments around the world.

Also unfortunate: Ricky Barnes is on the way for being remembered as a man who never lived up to the promise he showed at that same tournament, The Masters, as an amateur.

Let’s hope that changes.

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WATCH/LOOK AWAY: Jordan Spieth misses a 15-inch putt

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Aren’t you glad there isn’t video of all the 15-inch putts you’ve missed? I certainly am.

Unfortunately for Jordan Spieth, his failed attempt from little more than a foot at the Byron Nelson was captured on video, and it will exist on the internet for all eternity.

Spieth, who has struggled with the flatstick lately, stood over a short par putt at the par-4 15th hole, and well…

Spieth is currently 183rd on the PGA Tour this season in strokes gained: putting, losing .412 strokes per round to the field on the greens.

But at least he hit the hole, right?

Here’s the offending weapon: Spieth’s trusty Scotty Cameron 009.

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GolfWRX members debate: What should the World Golf Hall of Fame criteria be?

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There have been a couple of controversial inclusions on the World Golf Hall of Fame. This isn’t to rehash, say, Fred Couples earning a spot, but rather, take a look at entry criteria.

More specifically, GolfWRX member playar32 writes

“I know the actual criteria is 15 tour wins, or 2 majors/Players championship. But what’s YOUR minimum?…For example, if a player won a “B” tournament every year (the one opposite a WGC event), every year in a row for 15 years, but missed the cut in every other event, would you still considered them HOF?”

It’s an interesting point. Specifically, the World Golf Hall of Fame criteria for an active male golfer is as follows.

“A player must have a cumulative total of 15 or more official victories on any of the original members of the International Federation of PGA Tours (PGA TOUR, European Tour, Japan Golf Tour, Sunshine Tour, Asian Tour and PGA of Australasia) OR at least two victories among the following events: The Masters, THE PLAYERS Championship, the U.S. Open, The Open Championship and the PGA Championship.”

Further, a player must be at least 50 or five years removed from competition.

Here are some other WRX members’ takes.

Bladehunter says

“15 tour wins and 2 majors for me. Otherwise almost every 1 major winner out there is in.”

McCann1 says

“If we won’t remember your name without the HOF in 50 years I think you shouldn’t be in.”

Fowlerscousin says

“If any of these three criteria are met: 3 or more majors. Minimum 5 Ryder cup appearances. 15 tour victories.”

Hawkeye77 says

“Whatever the criteria are, don’t ever think about it unless someone whose speech I want to hear gets in.’

Golfer929 has more stringent standards

“20 Wins. 3 Majors. 2 Ryder Cup/President Cup appearances. 100 total weeks inside Top 50 OWGR.”

Golfgirlrobin says

“I’d like to see them go to some sort of point system like the LPGA uses. Factor in everything that’s important and let the chips fall where they may.”

You’ll want to check out the rest of what GolfWRX members have to say in the thread.

There are a ton off questions to consider when thinking about which current/recent players should make the HoF.

A few…

1. Should the standards be on par with other sports? If so, what does that look like?
2. If the WGHOF should be more/less stringent, why?
3. How important are major victories? Why two and not three?
4. Why 15 wins and not 10? Or 20?

All important questions, and ones which the golf fans of the world should be able to weigh in on, rather than merely a selection committee of 16 people.

Let us know what you think, GolfWRX members!

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