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GolfWRX members debate: Do you need to be a good putter to win the Masters?

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In a forum thread that’s gathering momentum, Salmon1a links out to Joel Beall’s look at winners’ putting performances at Augusta National. “An interesting article focusing on Spieth’s 2018 putting woes and how it may not matter at The Masters, he writes.’

Beall provides this interesting Rory McIlroy quote

“At Augusta you don’t need to putt great, you need to not waste any shots, no three putts, hole everything inside five feet…You don’t need to hole every 15-footer that you look at, you need to be efficient, just not to be wasteful.”

“McIlroy may have a point,” Beall adds. “After all, Bubba Watson is routinely one of the worst putters on tour, and he’s won the tournament twice. So we took a closer look: do Masters winners double as good putters, or is there something else at play?”

His finding: seven of the last 10 winners of the Masters have been anything but good putters.

GolfWRX members were keen to discuss this conclusion.

Knock it close writes

“The one hard thing is The Masters don’t have the SG stats for the week, so we don’t see how these bad putters putted when they won. But yes it absolutely is vital to hit the ball well at ANGC, especially approaches. That’s pretty consistent on tour though, sg on approaches is the most important from looking at a yearly money standpoint but the elite tee to green player that putts well that week usually wins.’

Bladehunter disagrees with McIlroy

“That’s why he hasn’t won a green jacket and a great putting Spieth is about 4 strokes from owning 3. Lol. He still doesn’t get it.”

Night train says

“Toughest tournament in the world to make five footers………and you’ll have a lot of them. Putting is very important.”

Check out the thread for the rest of replies.

What do you think, GolfWRX members, is the importance of putting well to play well at Augusta National overstated?

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6 Comments

6 Comments

  1. Bob Parson Jr.

    Apr 7, 2018 at 11:01 pm

    Can somebody tell Jordan Spieth to grow up and quit whining, please!

  2. Scooter

    Apr 1, 2018 at 10:23 am

    Once you see the course in person, it really hits you that placement of your approach shots into the greens is critically important. Many greens have a small area that you must hit in order to have a realistic chance for birdie … miss that area and you’ll have to work for par … hit that area and you can get a few birdies with solid-or-better putting.

  3. Ghhh

    Mar 31, 2018 at 10:51 pm

    Don’t have to worry about Spieth winning it this year. Dude can’t make a 3 footer to save his life! I love it!

  4. AndyK

    Mar 31, 2018 at 1:15 pm

    I think the greens have so much break negates putting a bit. I feel better putters have advantages on courses with tame greens as the start the ball correctly more often.

    Augusta I feel the most important thing is being in the correct spot and giving your self easier putters. While putting obviously helps, I think the great ball strikers/poor putters (Sergio, Rose, Stenson, Matsuyama, Scott…) have a better chance to win at Augusta then shaky ball strikers excellent putters (Fowler, Reed, Snedeker, Kuchar)

    Spieth and Woods should historically be great here, shaky off the tee, excellent iron play, excellent putting.

  5. ChipNRun

    Mar 30, 2018 at 3:01 pm

    Hard to say. But, you can’t be a BAD putter and win… those large greens and fast speeds require basic competence.

    • AndyK

      Mar 31, 2018 at 1:21 pm

      Sure you can. Sergio ranked 168th in putting last year and Rose 123rd.
      You can be a bad putter and win the Masters.

      I guessing Sergio was more average then terrible last year during the week, but still he’s a bad putter.

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19th Hole

Pat Perez: The R&A “do it right, not like the USGA”

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Pat Perez opened The Open, as it were, with a 2-under 69, and at the time of this writing, he’s 4 under for the second round and tied for the lead.

Clearly, there’s something Double P likes about links golf. And when he was asked whether he was surprised by how receptive the greens at Carnoustie were after his opening round, Perez shook his head with conviction and said.

“They (the R&A) do it right, not like the USGA…They’ve got the opposite [philosophy] here. I told them, you guys have it right, let the course get baked, but you’ve got the greens receptive. They’re not going to run and be out of control. They could have easily had the greens just like the fairway, but they didn’t. The course is just set up perfect.”

“The U.S. Open could have been like this more if they wanted to. They could have made the greens a bit more receptive,” Perez said. “These greens are really flat compared to Shinnecock. So that was kind of the problem there is they let it get out of control and they made the greens too hard.”

Pat Perez has no problem speaking his mind. While it has gotten him in trouble in the past, you have to respect his candor. The interesting question, as I asked in the Morning 9, is how many Tour pros agree him?

Sure, it’s unlikely any of Perez’s compatriots will join him publicly in his “R&A does it right, USGA does it wrong” stance, but it’d be very interesting to know what percentage are of the same mind.

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19th Hole

68 at the British Open in the morning, golf with hickories at St Andrews in the afternoon

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Yes, golf fans, just another day in the charmed life (or week, at least) of one Brandon Stone.

Stoney (as I assume his friends call him), came to Carnoustie on the heels of a final-round 60 to win the Scottish Open. All he did in his opening round was fire a 3-under 68. Not bad!

But his Thursday to remember was only getting started as Stone made the 25-mile trip south to the Old Course to peg it…with a set of hickory clubs! Well played, sir, well played.

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19th Hole

Jean van de Velde’s 1999 British Open collapse is still tough to watch in LEGO form

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Gather ‘round, golf fans, for the saddest British Open story ever told–in LEGOs.

Maestro of the plastic medium, Jared Jacobs, worked his singular magic on Jean van de Velde’s notorious final-hole collapse at Carnoustie in 1999.

The interlocking plastic brick cinema begins after van de Velde’s approach shot has caromed off a grandstand railing to land on the opposite side of the Barry Burn.

 

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