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Living the Dream: Meet Scott E.G., owner of an independent Tour truck on the PGA Tour

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I often get asked, “who’s the coolest guy you’ve ever met during all your golf travels?” The answer is easy, especially for a complete equipment geek like me. Scott E. Garrison, the only owner-operator of a “Tour Van” on the PGA Tour. Here’s his story…

Scott E. Garrison (Scott E.G.) grew up in a military family, where his father was a Major and member of the military police. He became accustom to a nomadic lifestyle in his early years, which helped prepare him for PGA Tour life. At the age of 11, his mother bought him his first set of clubs. He would walk to “Las Vegas Muni” after school and practice. He spent so much time there that they gave him a job picking range balls. Fascinated by the complex nature of the game, Scott was sold; he quickly spent every second either trying to perfect his swing or begging his mother for the opportunity to play an upcoming tournament!

A friend suggested he get the clubs cut down and referred him to Bill Bayer. He watched his clubs get custom built and fell in love with the process.

“I was fascinated by the prospect of being able to re-grip my own clubs and I was mesmerized by how the sparks flew as he cut the shafts,” Scott said. “I began to tinker and learn from him. I still utilize the tips he gave me.”

After returning home from his time in the Army, Scott decided to follow his passion and bought a golf shop named Rocky’s in Las Vegas. He later changed the name of the shop to the Golf Doctor.

“It was the first shop in Vegas to have a state of the art swing analyzer and video,” Scott said.

Scott became known as “The Golf Doc” by local golf professionals, players, industry leaders and engineers. One significant relationship he began during this time was with Kim Braly, the shaft engineering genius behind what is now known as KBS shafts.

“I value my relationship with Kim both personally and professionally,” Scott said. “He was always on the cutting edge of technology and I learned a great deal from him.”

Eventually, Scott sold the shop and went on to do mobile golf repair. One of his trailers serviced 9 golf courses in Las Vegas, while the larger one was a permanent fixture at Angel Park Golf Club for over four years. He also did many Long Drive events for Harrison Sports.

By 2003, Scott, now a nationally recognized builder, was asked by Harrison Sports to go on the PGA Tour with his trailer. He secured a few more sponsors and the rest was history. He has been a staple on tour since, working with over 100 tour players and building relationships with companies such as KBS, Super Stroke Golf and SST Pure. Today, Scott is one of only two independent tour trucks and everyone now knows him as “Scott E.G.” His truck recently became one of the most technologically advanced ones out there with the addition of Cool Clubs equipment.

“Thanks to Kim Braly and Mark Timms (founder, owner of Cool Clubs), we now have the amazing technology that Cool Clubs has created right at our finger tips,” Scott said.

Last year, after spending time with Scott E.G., I highlighted the use of his SST Pure machine created to Pure shafts. This year, time with Scott E.G. did not disappoint either. He now has some amazing technology created by Cool Clubs that assists with EI Profiles.

What is an EI profile? The stiffness of a golf shaft varies along its length depending on a set of variables, which include materials, construction and quality. When speaking about EI, the goal is the test the shaft at different points (from butt to tip) to create an overall profile of the shaft. This is done by a simply process of applying force, measuring deflection and then using the variables to compute EI for the series of points.

According to Kim Braly, there are many EI machines on the market; however none of them are this thorough.

“This machine by Cool Clubs measures the entire shaft, torque, straightness, launch angle, spin and even frequency,” Braly says. “You can even measure frequency with the grip on or off.”

Scott says this process is invaluable because if a PGA Tour player wants to change shafts or try something a little different, the process allows Scott to compare shafts and fit the player properly.

By now, you’re probably pretty interested in what Scotty does as well! If you want to keep up with him and his travels, I would highly recommend following him on Instagram @scotteggolf. It’s one of my favorite follows and I am sure you will love it!

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Brendan is the owner of Golf Placement Services, a boutique business which aims to apply his background in golf and higher education to help educate players, their families and coaches about the process! Website - www.golfplacementservices.com Insta - golf.placement.sevices Twitter @BMRGolf

3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Benjamin Gold

    Mar 31, 2018 at 8:41 am

    This is super cool to hear of an independent on tour! Love to meet this guy and talk shop. I used to work for a really good golf shop with a well knowledge builder and I learned so much from him and the game. My friend is now long gone from Indiana and we have no golf shops in Bloomington, IN that can do anything. It would so cool if a traveling van could/would roll through a town such as ours and help fellow golfers out.

  2. Robert Parsons

    Mar 30, 2018 at 12:58 pm

    Best golfwrx story to date!

    Don’t know the guy, never heard of him, but I’m a fan now!

  3. Zac

    Mar 29, 2018 at 9:34 pm

    This guy is too cool! I used to work at colonial and every year during the tournament he’s give use cases on rockstar energy drinks, showed us how to pure shafts, etc. just because he got bored.

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The Gear Dive: DJ, Bryson’s length, and putters with TaylorMade’s Bill Price and Paul Demkowski

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In this episode of TGD, Johnny goes in on when Tiger might play, Bryson’s bulk, and goes in deep with Bill Price and Paul Demkowski of TaylorMade on the success of Spider X and Truss.

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Opinion & Analysis

The Wedge Guy: Ball flight and spin rate, Part 2

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This past week, I was out at our club doing some research on launch angles and spin rates. My “Iron Byron” was our first assistant golf professional Joe Mitchell, who is one of the most consistent ball strikers I’ve seen. Joe has a reputation for being laser straight with every club, from driver to wedges, and is one of the best putters I’ve watched. The only “flaw” in Joe’s game, which he admits, is that he is not nearly as long as the young guns.

After we had finished up the round of research on various makes and models of short irons and wedges, Joe had a couple of drivers he wanted to test to see if he could eke a few extra yards out of his tee shots. Watching him hit golf balls is kind of boring actually, because they all look alike. As we went from driver to driver, there really wasn’t much visual difference in the ball flight pattern, but then the Foresight Sports GC2 launch monitor came into play.

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His spin number dropped from 35-3900 to 26-2800 rpms, launch angles did not change, ball speed off the clubhead did not change more than one mph or so, but distance improved by almost ten yards! So, the mere act of backing off a bit from “full power” actually improved his driving distance, and there’s no question that even Joe is going to hit the driver straighter if he’d not trying to “max out” on every swing.

We duplicated the test a number of times, Joe hitting drives at full power then backing off a bit. And the results were the same every time–the “controlled” swing produced about 1,000 RPMs less spin and greater distance than did the full out swings.

So, while you may not have a GC2 launch monitor available, you can do your own version of this test. Take a dozen or so balls that you play, mark half of them, and go out on the course when it’s not busy. Hit six drives with your “full power” swing, and then six more with a swing that feels like 85-90 percent of that. Then walk or drive down and see what the two patterns look like.

And then chime back in here with your results. Let’s see if we can’t build a body of real golfer test material right here, OK?

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Golf's Perfect Imperfections

Golf’s Perfect Imperfections: Driver golf swing analysis of Bryson DeChambeau

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In this week’s golf topic we reflect on the most important aspects of maxing out the distance in your driver swing so you can launch it high with low spin to get big carry distances and a nice roll out on your drives. And we dissect how Bryson has used the best of both worlds of strength and fast-twitch training in the gym to increase his club speed dramatically.

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