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This new Miura documentary is must-watch stuff for equipment junkies

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Last week, we told you a Miura documentary was on the horizon. Today, it’s here.

The mysterious Japanese company’s wares have had a cult following in the golf equipment space since company founder, Katsuhiro Miura, began forging and hand-grinding clubs in 1957. The three-chapter documentary short begins by looking into company history, building techniques, and Miura’s reputation globally.

“Within Japan, the name Miura, specifically the name of our founder, Katsuhiro Miura, it is a legend,” says Shinei Miura.

Such is the bold, and entirely appropriate, start to Discovering Perfection: The Miura Story, and it only gets more interesting from there.

Just 10 minutes in length, this short documentary is well worth your time. Check it out!

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10 Comments

10 Comments

  1. Thomas

    Mar 21, 2018 at 10:53 am

    Howard Milstein is a usurous snake. First Nicklaus and now Miura selling out to snakes. Keep your money away.

  2. Mat

    Mar 20, 2018 at 2:26 am

    That is some great marketing material.

    I can speak to the tolerances. That is a real thing; they are dead on. Every. Single. Time.

    Just make sure you understand what you’re getting. Pure strikes do feel great. Like all blades, misses are punished. In the right hands, they really are nice. It’s one set of irons that will cure you of WRXism.

  3. Brett Weir

    Mar 19, 2018 at 9:10 pm

    Where’s the video??!?!

  4. dat

    Mar 19, 2018 at 6:24 pm

    annndddd…it’s gone

  5. Jim Donegan

    Mar 19, 2018 at 6:11 pm

    Video is unavailable.

  6. Shepard

    Mar 19, 2018 at 5:50 pm

    I have a set of Miura MC-102 Cavity backs which I got as pulls. I used them consistently for at least five years. They had almost no wear on them after the five years I used them (and still have them). This is amazing. I think the extra stamping does make the metal denser and as a result stronger. They are not soft clubs though. Lets say they are solid without being clicky. The specs are absolutely spot on which is a testament to their quality. They hit solidly, as I said, and I think the better you are the better you play. Not to say they don’t play well period. People in the know always want to hit them and are never disappointed. I put good recoil shafts in them (I am getting older) and can’t wait to play them when we complete our move to Florida in less than a week.

  7. youraway

    Mar 19, 2018 at 5:30 pm

    Liked the story but the “background Music” is really foreground music and excessively loud. One would think today’s audio experts could do better. I want to hear voices, not drowned by music.

    • bogey jones

      Mar 21, 2018 at 4:29 am

      i felt the same way…
      the production value is horrendous, this video could have been so much cooler in the hands of right filmmakers.

  8. stan

    Mar 19, 2018 at 4:21 pm

    Ahhhh…. the Miura mojo built into each iron head…. but not the hosel which is a cheap steel pipe that is spin-welded to the forged clubhead body. Of course additional forge stamping will create a denser metallurgy that will create a superior performing iron… ya think? 😛

  9. rex235

    Mar 19, 2018 at 3:32 pm

    Great story. Great clubs. Exceptional design.

    RH Only.

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19th Hole

Pat Perez: The R&A “do it right, not like the USGA”

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Pat Perez opened The Open, as it were, with a 2-under 69, and at the time of this writing, he’s 4 under for the second round and tied for the lead.

Clearly, there’s something Double P likes about links golf. And when he was asked whether he was surprised by how receptive the greens at Carnoustie were after his opening round, Perez shook his head with conviction and said.

“They (the R&A) do it right, not like the USGA…They’ve got the opposite [philosophy] here. I told them, you guys have it right, let the course get baked, but you’ve got the greens receptive. They’re not going to run and be out of control. They could have easily had the greens just like the fairway, but they didn’t. The course is just set up perfect.”

“The U.S. Open could have been like this more if they wanted to. They could have made the greens a bit more receptive,” Perez said. “These greens are really flat compared to Shinnecock. So that was kind of the problem there is they let it get out of control and they made the greens too hard.”

Pat Perez has no problem speaking his mind. While it has gotten him in trouble in the past, you have to respect his candor. The interesting question, as I asked in the Morning 9, is how many Tour pros agree him?

Sure, it’s unlikely any of Perez’s compatriots will join him publicly in his “R&A does it right, USGA does it wrong” stance, but it’d be very interesting to know what percentage are of the same mind.

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68 at the British Open in the morning, golf with hickories at St Andrews in the afternoon

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Yes, golf fans, just another day in the charmed life (or week, at least) of one Brandon Stone.

Stoney (as I assume his friends call him), came to Carnoustie on the heels of a final-round 60 to win the Scottish Open. All he did in his opening round was fire a 3-under 68. Not bad!

But his Thursday to remember was only getting started as Stone made the 25-mile trip south to the Old Course to peg it…with a set of hickory clubs! Well played, sir, well played.

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Jean van de Velde’s 1999 British Open collapse is still tough to watch in LEGO form

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Gather ‘round, golf fans, for the saddest British Open story ever told–in LEGOs.

Maestro of the plastic medium, Jared Jacobs, worked his singular magic on Jean van de Velde’s notorious final-hole collapse at Carnoustie in 1999.

The interlocking plastic brick cinema begins after van de Velde’s approach shot has caromed off a grandstand railing to land on the opposite side of the Barry Burn.

 

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