Connect with us

Published

on

In this video, I discuss the role of the trail elbow in the downswing. I also share some great drills to help golfers deliver the trail elbow correctly, which will help improve distance and contact.

Your Reaction?
  • 29
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT2
  • FLOP4
  • OB0
  • SHANK24

Find him on YouTube at: https://www.youtube.com/user/adaviesgolf Advanced Fellow of the PGA Head Golf Professional The Marriott Forest of Arden The Golfing Machine Authorised Instructor TPI Certified Fitness Golf Instructor PGA Swing Lecturer PGA Swing Examiner PGA Qualified in 1999, Achieving 3rd position Trainee of the Year Roles Former Academy Coach Wales South West Squad Performance Director Midland Performance Golf Academy Coach to GB & I Squad Member Head Coach to Birmingham University Teams Coach to Solihull College AASE England programme Coached Numerous County Squads including Staffordshire, Warwickshire and Derby. Philosophy I am a highly self-motivated full time coach committed to improve players of all standards. Through continually developing my skills and knowledge I am considered one of the leading coaches and have been recently voted in Golf Worlds top 100 coaches. Having excellent communication skills enables me to be able to deliver first class tuition to all levels of golfers and this is reflected in my achievements from my players and personal accolades.

3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Andy Brumer

    Apr 25, 2018 at 12:02 pm

    This is a nice article about the trail elbow, however this down and in front of the trail hip is only one of multiple manner in which to position that elbow at it’s release point. Jim Furyk’s trail elbow is up and out and behind his right hip at the release point in a “pushing” orientation. Multiple player’s have their trail elbow not down in front but down and at the side of the right hip (for righties) at this point. So to teach this trail elbow in a down and in front location, what The Golfing Machine calls a “pitch position” suitable for true “Swingers” of the club is sadly an incomplete presentation of the subject. People who drive the club more with their right (trail) arm, i.e, Hitters vs Swingers, vs pulling or drawing the club via their pivot, will find this lesson harmful.

    • george

      Apr 26, 2018 at 8:01 pm

      Suggest that Furyk has right elbow behind his right hip, at P6, allowing his pivot
      to pull the butt of the club with both left and right side to square the clubface
      RATHER than releasing with hands.
      With right elbow in front of right hip at P6 the only way to square the clubface is to use
      hands(forearm muscles) and we all know how timing dependent hitting with hands is, with misses both ways. Like Ben Hogan , Furyk rarely misses left.

  2. george

    Apr 25, 2018 at 9:39 am

    Lag is all that is required in the DS.
    With lag; the right elbow, forward shaft lean, open hips and shoulders at impact all fall into place when the clubhead lags behind the hands from top of BS past impact.

    Without lag, each of the listed body positions is meaningless.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Instruction

Gabe Hjertstedt teaches Doc Rivers how to hit the lofted chip shot

Published

on

In the first episode of this instructional series with Short Game Guru Gabe Hjertstedt and NBA Coach for the Los Angeles Clippers Doc Rivers, Gabe teaches Doc how to hit the lofted chip shot to get the ball to stop quicker on the green.

Look out for more videos this week including more from Gabe and Doc’s short game session, their full lesson, and our interview with Doc.

Enjoy the first video below!

Your Reaction?
  • 10
  • LEGIT4
  • WOW5
  • LOL1
  • IDHT2
  • FLOP1
  • OB1
  • SHANK8

Continue Reading

Instruction

WATCH: How to hit your driver more consistently

Published

on

In this video, I share two great drills that will help you improve your driving today.

Your Reaction?
  • 9
  • LEGIT2
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK7

Continue Reading

Instruction

3 keys for getting out of bunkers with soft sand

Published

on

One of the most infuriating things in golf is to land in a bunker that has too much sand, or sand with the consistency of a truckload of talcum power. Now, I am not picking on the Superintendents; they do have to add new sand from time-to-time, so no hate mail please! It’s my fault for hitting it in the bunker in the first place, and bunkers are supposed to be hazards; I know that.

The one thing we will assume for this article is that even though we are in soft sand, we will have a good lie, not a plugged or semi-plugged one. We are in a bunker that just has a bunch of sand, or it’s soft and fluffy sand. Everyone asks me what the secret is to handling these types of conditions and I’m here to help you get better.

1) Get a wedge with the correct bounce

Let’s consider that you play the same golf course every weekend, or that you mostly play on courses that have the same type of playing conditions mostly. When you have this luxury, you should have wedges that fit the conditions you tend to play. So, if you have a low bounce wedge with a sharp flange and you’re playing from bunkers with lots of sand, then you are putting yourself at a disadvantage.

Why alter your swing if the wedge you have can help you? Use a high bounce wedge (9-12 degrees of bounce) for soft sand, and a low bounce wedge (6-8 degrees) for firm sand.

2) Control your Angle of Attack 

As with most things in golf, there are always things that you must pay attention to in order for you to have the odds in your favor. Simple things such as paying attention to the lie you have can help you save shots in the rough. In bunkers, you cannot test the surface, however, you can use your feet to feel the density of the sand. Pay attention to what you feel in the balls of your feet. If you feel a ton of sand below you, then you know you will have to alter your angle of attack if you want any chance to get out of the bunker successfully.

So what do I mean by this?

The setting of your wrists has a very dynamic effect on how much the wedge digs in or skids through the sand (assuming you have an open face). When there is a surplus of sand, you will find that a steeper attack caused by the maximum cocking of your wrists makes it much easier for the wedge to work too vertical and dig too deep. When you dig too deep, you will lose control of the ball as there is too much sand between the blade and the ball — it will not spin as much and won’t have the distance control you normally have.

The secret to playing from softer sand is a longer and wider bunker swing with much less wrist-set than you would use on your stock bunker shot. This action stops the club from digging too deep and makes it easier for you to keep moving through the ball and achieving the distance you need.

3) Keep your pivot moving

It’s nearly impossible to keep the rotation of your shoulders going when you take too much sand at impact, and the ball comes up short in that situation every time. When you take less sand, you will have a much easier time keeping your pivot moving. This is the final key to good soft-sand bunker play.

You have made your longer and more shallow backswing and are returning to the ball not quite as steeply as you normally do which is good… now the only thing left to do is keep your rear shoulder rotating through impact and beyond. This action helps you to make a fuller finish, and one that does not lose too much speed when the club impacts the sand. If you dig too deep, you cannot keep the rear shoulder moving and your shots will consistently come up short.

So if you are in a bunker with new sand, or an abundance of sand, remember to change your bounce, adjust your angle of attack, and keep your pivot moving to have a fighting chance.

Your Reaction?
  • 136
  • LEGIT15
  • WOW3
  • LOL2
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP3
  • OB4
  • SHANK4

Continue Reading

Trending