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In this video, I share with you how to stop swaying for good. I demonstrate how to use PNF (proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation) to create the correct movements in your backswing. This video is part of a series on PNF drills.

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Find him on YouTube at: https://www.youtube.com/user/adaviesgolf Advanced Fellow of the PGA Head Golf Professional The Marriott Forest of Arden The Golfing Machine Authorised Instructor TPI Certified Fitness Golf Instructor PGA Swing Lecturer PGA Swing Examiner PGA Qualified in 1999, Achieving 3rd position Trainee of the Year Roles Former Academy Coach Wales South West Squad Performance Director Midland Performance Golf Academy Coach to GB & I Squad Member Head Coach to Birmingham University Teams Coach to Solihull College AASE England programme Coached Numerous County Squads including Staffordshire, Warwickshire and Derby. Philosophy I am a highly self-motivated full time coach committed to improve players of all standards. Through continually developing my skills and knowledge I am considered one of the leading coaches and have been recently voted in Golf Worlds top 100 coaches. Having excellent communication skills enables me to be able to deliver first class tuition to all levels of golfers and this is reflected in my achievements from my players and personal accolades.

3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. johnny

    Feb 26, 2018 at 10:14 am

    Most of the best players in the world laterally bump their hips to get on their right side to start their swing. You need to do this in order to properly grab the ground with the right foot and load the right glute. If you stay centered the entire time you would be missing out on a huge power source. Yes, doing it too much can definately be detrimental but you need atleast a little bit of lateral movement and it also helps start the downswing naturally with the hips bumping back to the target. Watch how much Rory gets on his right side during the takeaway.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iH-GlpozSg

  2. Peter R

    Feb 25, 2018 at 5:38 am

    Thanks! @Allistair, wished you had explained that in the vid. Good concept though. Thoughts for practicing this when you don’t have someone to help??

  3. Ogo

    Feb 24, 2018 at 3:57 pm

    PNF (proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation)….. so I went to Wikipedia for more info and I got this!!!!:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stretching
    😀 😀 😀 😀

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Instruction

WATCH: The problem with swinging too far from the inside (Lesson of the Day)

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In our all new “Lesson of the Day” video series with V1 Sports, we match a different GolfWRX member with a different V1 Sports instructor each day. It’s extremely important to both V1 Sports and GolfWRX to help golfers improve their games and shoot lower scores, and there’s no better way to do that than getting lessons. While we not only want to provide free lessons to select GolfWRX members, we want to encourage and inspire golfers to seek professional instruction. For instructions on how to submit your own video for a chance at getting a free lesson from a V1 Sports instructor as part of our Lesson of the Day series, CLICK HERE.

In today’s Lesson of the Day, V1 Sports Instructor John Hughes teaches GolfWRX Member Brandon Goodwin the importance of alignment, and why coming too far from the inside can be detrimental.

Hughes has more than 29 years of experience. He’s the golf coach to beginners, intermediates, elite juniors and amateurs, corporate executives, celebrities, mini tour and major tour winners. One of only 368 individuals who have earned the designation of PGA Master Professional, Hughes has the skills, knowledge, experience, and passion to provide you an opportunity to experience the absolute best golf lesson you will ever have, as well as assist you in reaching your potential. For more, check out his website here.

Enjoy the video lesson below!

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WATCH: How to swing the driver “from the inside”

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In this video, I show you how to consistently deliver the driver from the inside.

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Golf 101: How to properly grip the golf club

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I’m sure you’ve heard by now that a good grip is one of the cornerstones of a good swing. Clichés become clichés because they’re true, and putting your hands on the club is extremely important… for reasons you know, and for some reasons you probably haven’t heard before.

Let’s start with the big, obvious one you already know. Your grip establishes the default relationship between the clubface and the golf ball. If you set your grip in a way that promotes bringing the club back to impact open or closed, you’re going to have to do something else in your swing to compensate for that. In other words, a sound grip makes the job of squaring the club easier.

The less obvious reason that a good grip is important is speed. If you set the club in your hands correctly—so that the handle runs across the base of the fingers in your left hand and not across the palm—you’re giving your wrists much more freedom to move. This wrist “mobility” is what allows the final transfer of energy from the body to the club. A great swing thought is to envision that your wrist joints were just greased up. They should feel like they are unrestricted and “oily.”

Another less obvious problem caused by a bad grip is that it tends to perpetuate itself. If you have a bad grip and repeatedly make off-center contact on the clubface, the off-center hits will actually jar the face of the club more off-line, and you’ll hit it even more crooked. And the bad feeling those shots produce in your hands will cause you to continually adjust it. There’s no consistency or feel there. It’s like hitting a whole bunch of baseballs off the end of an aluminum bat on a 39-degree day. A recipe for pain.

To fix your grip, start with your left (top) hand. Set the handle along the first joints of your fingers, and hold it like you would carry a suitcase or briefcase by its handle.

When you get the grip in this position, you’re creating an angle (and a lever) between the club and your left arm, and you’re giving the wrist freedom to move. If you turned the handle so that it crossed your palm diagonally—like a putting grip—you’d immediately feel how your wrist would be much more restricted in how it could bend or turn. That’s why it’s great for putting—because it restricts how the face turns. But on a full swing, you want to take full advantage of the range of motion that comes from rotating from open to square. (this is what the club is designed to do!)

Get a firm grip on the handle with all of the fingers of your left hand and get as much of the thumbprint pushed onto the grip as you can. Now, place your right hand on the handle so that the underside of your right thumb covers the left thumb as much as possible, and get as much of the thumbprint on your right hand onto the top of the grip as possible.

Where you place your hand on the grip is more important than if you decide to interlock, overlap or play with all 10 fingers on the handle. I prefer the overlapping grip because it keeps the index finger of your left hand on the handle, and that extra finger can make a difference for many players.

If your grip isn’t great and you make these changes, it’ll definitely feel strange at first. But I’m betting that straighter and longer shots will make up for it.

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