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Most golfers understand shafts are designated by flex… but what is often misunderstood is how shaft flex relates to other factors not often discussed including weight and profile.

In the video, I break down some simple things to consider when its comes to steel shafts — flex, weight and bend profile — as well as why you might fit into a flex you weren’t expecting.

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Ryan Barath is a club fitter and master club builder who has more than 15 years experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour professionals. He studied business and marketing at the Mohawk College in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and is the former Build Shop Manager & Social Media Coordinator for Modern Golf located in Toronto. He now works independently from his home shop in Hamilton and is a member of advisory panels to a select number of golf equipment manufacturers, including True Temper. You can find Ryan on Twitter and Instagram where he's always willing to chat golf, from course architecture to physics, and share his passion for club building, and wedge grinding.

9 Comments

9 Comments

  1. Dave

    Feb 25, 2018 at 12:35 pm

    Hi Ryan,

    I have been building and repairing clubs since the late 80s, while working at Kings Forest Golf Course. Over the years i have been fortunate enough to be educated by Tim Wishon, Oakville Golf staff… One question that i have for You is how much do you think playability is affected by putting a heavier midsize grip on a set of irons when they were originally built wuth standard size grips? Do you think i should tip weight heads to bring the swingweight up the 3 points or leave status quo? My friend is an excellent player at Heron Point and he said he did not notice the lower SW when i regripped with midsize grips.

    • Ryan Barath

      Feb 27, 2018 at 9:12 am

      Good Question Dave,

      Some players will notice the counter balanced effect of the heavier grips while many will not. By adding back more weight to the head to get the swing weight back you will also soften the shafts a bit. The proof is always in the pudding, and in the case of the added weight to the butt end if the players likes the performance dont worry about swing weight.

  2. Mario

    Feb 14, 2018 at 1:53 pm

    i partially disagree with what he said, for amateur golfers, weight is important to prevent injuries, few years ago with a new set of clubs, shaft 120g i got epicondylitis, in just two months, a fitter friend of mine told me to go for graphite, while another fitter told me to go for 80g steel, i follow the suggestion, and with the 80g i never got epicondylitis again

  3. Dave

    Feb 14, 2018 at 12:30 pm

    Great video! Question maybe you can answer this one. I’m playing regular, KBS C-Taper lites… my ball flight is very high, would like to bring it down as I play in Florida wind.. swing speed is pretty average. Would you suggest moving to graphite stiff???? Thx

    • TONEY P

      Feb 14, 2018 at 1:40 pm

      No the graphite would give a higher flight,lite shafts help get the ball airborne easy. Try a standard weight.

    • Ryan Barath

      Feb 27, 2018 at 9:14 am

      The single biggest factor for ball flight is player dynamics. If the ball flight is too high maybe try bending your irons a bit strong first before trying a shaft change.
      Best advice is to always see a fitter.

  4. Gorden

    Feb 12, 2018 at 2:28 pm

    Reading about flex is one thing, best thing is to find a fitter or even a big store like PGA Superstore and just hit balls with different shafts in what ever head your interested in playing. Either work with scope or just your feelings and you will find some that feel right or feel completely wrong…you may be supersized how different shafts can feel/work for you….while playing the head you want to play…

  5. Improving Golfer

    Feb 12, 2018 at 1:38 pm

    Great video! Could you do a video on CPM and how accurate shafts are in our clubs vs PROS clubs. More specifically, if you order a set of clubs from a major manufacturer, how accurate are the weight of club heads and weight and flex of shafts in what we have vs. what the pros have done. Some club fitters say they do a good job with quality control, others say its best to get CPM checked when clubs come in because a “stiff” shaft may be anywhere from 280 cpm to 305 cpm.

  6. Joro

    Feb 12, 2018 at 12:53 pm

    Great information, something everyone leaves out when talking about flex. If a person wants a correct flex the weight has to be considered which is why Dyn. Gold had 5 flexes within a flex. The lightest of the dyn. golds were at 125 and the heaviest at 130 gr. which created different flex within a flex.

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Equipment

Tour Edge launches new Exotics EXS Driver

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Tour Edge has introduced its new Exotics EXS Driver, which, according to the company, is designed for those golfers who seek a quality, high-performing product, but are constrained by budget.

The main feature of the brand-new product from Tour Edge is its Flight Tuning System (FTS). FTS allows adjustable sole weights to alternate between two different settings. Here’s a rundown of the two settings and what they are designed to provide:

  • FTS1: Nine-gram weight in the heel, three-gram weight in the rear for lower spin, slice reducing shape and a medium launch.
  • FTS2: Three-gram weight in the heel and a nine-gram weight in the rear for medium spin, neutral shape and a higher launch.

The New Exotics EXS Driver will also feature RollFace Technology and a new and improved SlipStream Sole. The RollFace technology incorporates modified bulge and roll on the toe, which is designed to promote straighter shots on balls hit off the toe. According to Tour Edge, the technology, combined with the enhanced sweet spot, makes this the most forgiving driver face ever produced by the company. Along with this, the new wider speed channels on the SlipStream sole are intended to improve club head speed.

Tour Edge President and Master Club Designer David Glod, explained why he believes the New Exotics EXS Driver will have a more significant impact on the market than any other Tour Edge driver before it.

“The EXS driver is absolutely loaded with technology. This is the most technology we’ve ever been able to fit into a design, and each one works in concert with one another to provide the best performing driver possible.”

“The shapes are beautiful, and we utilized only the finest in materials and components. I believe that at the aggressive price point that we are offering, the EXS driver will have its highest impact on the driver market over any other previous Exotics release.”

The New Exotics EXS Driver from Tour Edge will be available to purchase from Nov. 1, 2018, and will cost $299.

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Spotted: A new Odyssey “Stroke Lab Three” prototype putter

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Correction: This story originally reported this putter was in Patrick Reed’s bag. After further investigation, it was not.

Spotted at the 2018 Tour Championship at East Lake was an Odyssey Stroke Lab Three prototype putter. The putter appears to have a milled head and Odyssey’s familiar White Hot Microhinge face insert.

Stroke Lab may be a familiar name for some who know the Stroke Lab putters from around 2017. Mostly only available in the Japan Domestic Market (JDM), the Stroke Lab putters weighed heavier in the head — about 15 grams — and lighter in the shaft (about 29 grams), according to descriptions from True Spec Golf.

Is this a sign of things to come from Odyssey, or just a one-off? It would seem given the familiar name that it’s more the former than the latter, but only time will tell. What do you think about the Stroke Lab Three putter? Do you think it will be available in America at some point?

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Equipment

Sangmoon Bae’s Winning WITB: 2018 Albertsons Boise Open

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Driver: Callaway Rogue Sub Zero (10.5 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei CK Blue 60X

Fairway Wood: Callaway Rogue (15 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei CK Blue 80TX

Hybrid: Callaway Apex (20 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD-DI 95X

Irons: Callaway MB1 (4-PW)
Shafts: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 125X

Wedges: Callaway Mack Daddy 4 (52, 56 and 60 degrees)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold S400

Putter: Odyssey O-Works Red #7 CH

Golf Ball: Titleist

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