Connect with us
Advertisement

Published

on

When it comes to OEM quality control, there are a lot of factors that can cause clubs to not preform at their peak. This includes aspects of the club heads that can be seen once fully assembled.

In this video, I discuss the importance of the hosel bore and its effect on performance.

 

 

Your Reaction?
  • 15
  • LEGIT1
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK4

Ryan Barath is a club fitter and master club builder who has more than 15 years experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour professionals. He studied business and marketing at the Mohawk College in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and is the former Build Shop Manager & Social Media Coordinator for Modern Golf located in Toronto. He now works independently from his home shop in Hamilton and is a member of advisory panels to a select number of golf equipment manufacturers, including True Temper. You can find Ryan on Twitter and Instagram where he's always willing to chat golf, from course architecture to physics, and share his passion for club building, and wedge grinding.

22 Comments

22 Comments

  1. Jared

    Jun 2, 2018 at 8:51 pm

    Hey Ryan how can I contact you? I have a question regarding this video. Thanks.

  2. robert

    Jan 8, 2018 at 11:49 am

    Hi Ryan, good stuff, I live in Mississauga, where can I contact you Rob

    • brad

      Jan 9, 2018 at 12:28 am

      “good stuff” you say? I say inadequate explanations.
      This guy dumped his stuff on the WRX site and then cut and ran when the tough questions were asked.
      SHANK !!!!!

      • Ryan Barath

        Jan 10, 2018 at 7:22 pm

        Hi Brad,

        Was there a question I didn’t answer that you have? I would be happy to answer any question.

        Cheers
        Ryan

    • Ryan Barath

      Jan 10, 2018 at 7:24 pm

      Hi Robert,

      Do you have twitter or instagram? I would be happy to follow up any question you may have but don’t want to post my email publicly.

      Cheers

  3. Jeffrey Halverson

    Jan 6, 2018 at 2:38 pm

    Do you have an opinion on 718 MB blades and their hosel quality?

    Thanks

    • Ryan Barath

      Jan 10, 2018 at 8:21 am

      Across the board every OEM does a good job with this part of the process. Titleist is no exception with their 718 series.

      Its all about the manufacturing facility and from my understanding, its Endo ( same company that produces Epon ) that do Titleist heads – but I could be wrong on that.

  4. Brad

    Jan 6, 2018 at 2:02 pm

    When you bend a hosel you only bend the solid portion, not the hollow portion. Why would a misaligned hosel hole affect the stability of the hosel neck when bending?

    • Brad

      Jan 6, 2018 at 2:04 pm

      p.s. The only hosel fractures I have seen are in the solid hosel section, never in the hollow section.

    • Ryan Barath

      Jan 10, 2018 at 10:24 pm

      When being bent, if the hosel is thinner – as more stress is being placed then the metal will stretch too far and cause it to break.

      With cast clubs this usually means it just “snaps” in one quick motion but with forged clubs that are typically made of softer metal its kinda like bending a paper clip too many times and the metal will break.

  5. The dude

    Jan 6, 2018 at 1:32 pm

    Is that why the tolerances in Mizuno are so tight?…because they forged their hossels sepparately ??

  6. The dude

    Jan 6, 2018 at 1:30 pm

    Good stuff!,

  7. Steve

    Jan 4, 2018 at 3:51 pm

    Is it common for the hosel to be of “inferior” quality or is this a rare occurrence?

    • Ryan Barath

      Jan 4, 2018 at 7:55 pm

      This is more common place than you would think. Not so much as far as major OEM’s go but there are a few companies that have certain lines of products that can have a bad one every once and a while.

      Usually it is only ever found out once a club is being bent and it snaps. Then its very easy to spot because the bore is drilled lop-sided.

      • Brad

        Jan 6, 2018 at 1:55 pm

        IOW it doesn’t matter if the bore is not symmetrical with the hosel outer diameter, as long as you don’t bend it.
        And bending is only safe on forged clubs and double annealed cast clubs like Ping. Don’t try to bend el cheapo cast iron clubs because they are brittle at the hosel.

      • The dude

        Jan 7, 2018 at 12:41 pm

        What separates Mizuno from other forge??

  8. Sean

    Jan 4, 2018 at 12:19 pm

    Just want to make sure I understand what you are demonstrating, are you measuring the inside or outside part of the hosel? Thanks? Keep up the great work

    • Ryan Barath

      Jan 4, 2018 at 7:56 pm

      I am measuring the wall of the hosel all the way around the outside. The thickness of the walls should be the same all the way around.

      Thanks for the question.

      • Brad

        Jan 6, 2018 at 1:59 pm

        Are forged club hosels drilled out because you can’t forge a hole into a small hosel? A hosel hole can be accurately cast.
        How does a hosel hole get misaligned within the hosel?

        • Ryan Barath

          Jan 10, 2018 at 8:17 am

          Good Question. Hosels get misaligned from bad drilling and machine work.

          The one exception would be Muira that manufacture and machine the hosels separate then weld it to the rest of the already forged head.

  9. rex235

    Jan 4, 2018 at 10:54 am

    Your video features a set of Mizuno MP-18 irons.

    Mizuno MP-18 blade irons are RH Only.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Instruction

Master your takeaway with force and torques

Published

on

Most golf swings last less than 2 seconds, so it’s difficult to recover from any errors in the takeaway. Time is obviously limited. What most golfers fail to realize is that the force and torque they apply to the club in the initial stages of the swing can have major effects on how they are able to leverage the club with their arms and wrists.

Our research has shown that it is best to see the golfer as a series of connected links with the most consistent golfers transferring motion smoothly from one link to another and finally to the club. Approximately 19-25 percent of all the energy created in a golf swing actually makes its way into the motion of the club. That means the remaining 75-80 percent is used up in moving the body segments. This emphasizes the fact that a smooth takeaway is your best chance sequence the body links and become more efficient with your energy transfers.

In the video above, I give a very important lesson on how the forces and torques applied by the golfer in the takeaway shape the rest of the swing. There will be more to come on the subject in future articles.

Your Reaction?
  • 14
  • LEGIT9
  • WOW3
  • LOL1
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP2
  • OB1
  • SHANK9

Continue Reading

Videos

Los Feliz Short 9 in Hollywood from the movie “Swingers”: 1-Club Challenge

Published

on

Equipment expert Brian Knudson and Editor Andrew Tursky play the famous Los Feliz Short 9 golf course in Hollywood that was featured in the movie “Swingers.” They each take the 1-club challenge. For more info about how to get the Titleist “Two Guys Talking Golf” logo’d golf balls they used throughout the video, check out @tg2wrx on Instagram.

Enjoy the full video below!

Your Reaction?
  • 8
  • LEGIT1
  • WOW0
  • LOL1
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK4

Continue Reading

Videos

WATCH: Get more ball compression by squaring the back of your lead hand

Published

on

As part of my new “backhand” golf series, this episode helps you learn how to square the club face using your lead hand for better striking, accuracy and consistency!

Click here to watch Part 1: “Jordan Spieth’s and Sergio’s backhand techniques”

Your Reaction?
  • 1
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP1
  • OB0
  • SHANK4

Continue Reading

Trending