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Cape Kidnappers: The Ultimate Bucket List Course

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After 7 hours of driving down from Tara Iti, we finally arrived to a big gate that said, “Cape Kidnappers.” A big dream seemed to finally get real for us. It’s a course that has been designed by one of our best golf architects of our time, Tom Doak. I’d seen it in so many glossy golf magazines for more than a decade. Now it was within reach. My heart was beating faster with every passing second.

We gently pressed the button at the front gate and a polite voice answered. We said our names and nervously added “from Sweden” for no reason at all. It was completely quiet for a moment. I remember thinking maybe they wouldn’t let us in after all.

Five seconds later, the gate slowly started to open. We soon found out that we needed to drive for another 15 minutes in order to reach to Cape Kidnappers. It was like a film trailer, building up our expectations even more. Driving through the beautiful landscape on swirling roads that climb up to the top of the cliffs where Cape Kidnappers sits comfortably 500 feet over the sea is something I’ll never forget. The scenery was seriously off the charts and the word dramatic hardly describes it.

Upon our arrival to the club house, we received a warm welcome from the friendly staff. Quickly, we were all set and out on the golf course in a golf buggy. Our tee time was scheduled for the next day, and I guess we should be thankful for that because the winds were now blowing like crazy. While I tried to capture some photos at the famous Pirate’s Plank hole (No. 15), a brutal par-5 on the ridge of a big cliff, I accidentally dropped the scorecard. It probably flew farther than all my drives together during the trip.

The next day the wind was still there; it was quite rough, but not at a storm level like the previous day. It sure felt like we were alone on the course when we teed off, and the first five holes prepared us for bigger battles.

(C) Jacob Sjöman. jacob@sjomanart.com

We played Cape Kidnappers from the blue tees (6532 meters). The course obviously requires good shots to be successful, but also keep in mind that the fairways are pretty wide. If you are playing strategic golf and hit the ball solid, you can shoot a good score.

So what’s my opinion about Cape Kidnappers then? To me, it was a solid and great golf experience. It sure felt like that bucket-list course in the A category. I particularly enjoyed the last nine, which is maybe a bit more flat compared to the first nine. But still there are breathtaking holes like No. 15, Pirate’s Plank, and the magnificent tee box on No. 16.

“Some of the most tempting green sites at Cape Kidnappers were on the ground below the No. 6 and No. 13 greens,” Tom Doak told. “It would have been super dramatic to hit a shot to them, but there was no reasonable way to get down there to putt out and [get] back to the next tee. If someone ever perfects the jet pack, I have a couple of holes there I will redesign. The other part of it is that people have seen so many photos by air and almost none from ground level. It’s much different to play than expected.”

Was it the best golf course I’ve ever played? No, but it’s probably one of the coolest spots in the world where you can build a golf course. This course needs to be on your bucket list; I simply don’t believe you can’t leave it out.

(C) Jacob Sjöman. jacob@sjomanart.com

The next stop for us will be Cape Wickham Links in King Island. It’s one of the most interesting courses that has been built in recent years, and I can’t wait to see it.

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Since 2010, the tall Swede Jacob Sjöman has established himself as one of the premier golf course photographers in the world. Shooting from the ground, special high tripods, hanging out from helicopters and operating advanced drones, Jacob brings both fresh and amazing results to each project he undertakes. He has captured and left his own creative mark on some of the most recognized tracks around the world including Lofoten Links, Trump International Golf Links and now recently Gary Player's masterpiece in Bulgaria, Thracian Cliffs.

6 Comments

6 Comments

  1. BT

    Dec 29, 2017 at 3:38 pm

    I’ve had this on my Golf Bucket List for years. GFs run $350 USD. Stiff, but I’d drop it in a second. I’ll get there eventually and play it along with Kauri Cliffs. No sense in holding back!

    BT

  2. Joe Golfer

    Dec 29, 2017 at 2:23 am

    Sure looks penalizing if you miss a fairway.
    Wonder how much a round of golf costs there, if you can even get on, as perhaps it’s a private course?
    New Zealand certainly has some fantastic landscapes.

    • Kevin

      Dec 29, 2017 at 2:35 am

      The fairways are quite wide. You can play at Cape Kidnappers but you need to contact Cape Kidnappers in advance. It’s not cheap to play there but I believe it’s worth the money.

  3. Robert Parsons

    Dec 28, 2017 at 7:17 pm

    So where exactly is this course? Where is tara iti? New Zealand? On Google maps, it doesn’t look like a course is there.

    • Kevin

      Dec 29, 2017 at 2:50 am

      Tara Iti is located close to Mangawhai in New Zealand. It’s a 2-hour drive from Auckland Airport but a lot of the guests arrive with helicopter and you will need to contact the club before you arrive (it is a very private course).
      Cape Kidnappers is located on the North Island of New Zealand (same island as Tara Iti) but it is a pretty long drive down to the course (surely around 6-7 hours from Tara Iti and 4-5 hours from Auckland. Napier is located in this area. I believe you can search for Hawke’s Bay to find the correct position.

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Hidden Gem of the Day: Swope Memorial Golf Course in Kansas City

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These aren’t the traditional “top-100” golf courses in America, or the ultra-private golf clubs you can’t get onto. These are the hidden gems; they’re accessible to the public, they cost less than $50, but they’re unique, beautiful and fun to play in their own right. We recently asked our GolfWRX Members to help us find these “hidden gems.” We’re treating this as a bucket list of golf courses to play across the country, and the world. If you have a personal favorite hidden gem, submit it here! 

Today’s Hidden Gem was submitted by GolfWRX member CVC (with a +1 from sabram), and it’s called Swope Memorial Golf Course in Kansas City. Here’s why it was submitted, according to CVC:

“This A.W. Tillinghast design sits on hills in the middle of Swope Park in Kansas City. A municipal course managed by Orion Management Systems, it offers amazing view of the Kansas City skyline, typical Tillinghast guarded greens that reward good shots by funneling the ball toward the hole. Opened in 1935, it features mature trees and elevation changes that make it a pleasure to play.”

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Check out more photos of the course below (provided by GolfWRX user sabram), and click here to enter your favorite local hidden gem!

Click here to enter your favorite local hidden gem!

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Hidden Gem of the Day: Sand Creek Station in Newton, Kansas

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These aren’t the traditional “top-100” golf courses in America, or the ultra-private golf clubs you can’t get onto. These are the hidden gems; they’re accessible to the public, they cost less than $50, but they’re unique, beautiful and fun to play in their own right. We recently asked our GolfWRX Members to help us find these “hidden gems.” We’re treating this as a bucket list of golf courses to play across the country, and the world. If you have a personal favorite hidden gem, submit it here! 

Today’s Hidden Gem is called Sand Creek Station located in Newton, Kansas, and it was submitted by GolfWRX Member grandslambound. Here’s why the course was submitted…

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Check out more photos of the course below, and if you have a Hidden Gem (under $50) you think belongs on our list, submit it here!

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Hidden Gem of the Day: Cedar Crest, home of the 1927 PGA Championship

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These aren’t the traditional “top-100” golf courses in America, or the ultra-private golf clubs you can’t get onto. These are the hidden gems; they’re accessible to the public, they cost less than $50, but they’re unique, beautiful and fun to play in their own right. We recently asked our GolfWRX Members to help us find these “hidden gems.” We’re treating this as a bucket list of golf courses to play across the country, and the world. If you have a personal favorite hidden gem, submit it here! 

Today’s hidden gem, submitted by GolfWRX Member Simp, is called Cedar Crest Golf Course in Dallas, Texas. If you’re a golf historian, you may recognize the course (formerly known as Cedar Crest Country Club) as the host of the 1927 PGA Championship. That was back when the PGA Championship was a match play event, and in the 1927 competition, Walter Hagen defeated Joe Turnesa 1up.

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Check out more photos of the course, submitted by GolfWRX Member Simp, below, And if you have a Hidden Gem (under $50) you want to submit, click here.

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