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More Distance Off the Tee (Part 3 of 3): Rotary Power Training

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It is no secret that being able to rotate with speed, efficiency and power is a big part of the recipe to hit it long off the tee. I am going to outline the top-three rotational exercises that we use with our athletes to increase this type of power… but we have to talk about something else first.

If you did not read “4 Critical Tests to Compare Yourself to the Pro’s” yet, do it now. You need to understand that if you can’t rotate at your hips, spine, shoulders and neck, the exercises that follow below are not going to help. If you have not yet earned the right to move fast in rotation because you don’t have the mobility and you still try to do these exercises, you are asking for a injury. Before reading any further, make sure you actually have the mobility to rotate! If you’re still reading, I will assume you have great rotary mobility and are ready to take your rotational power to the next level. That is where these three exercises come in.

As with the other power articles (Part 1 and 2), make sure not to do more than 6 reps per set to assure you are able to go as hard as possible on each rep. Take a rest between each set and make sure you are not out of breath when you start. In order for these exercises to be the most effective, you need to be able to go as hard as you can on each rep; that is not doable if you are sucking wind.

Cable Machine Push/Pull

The key here is to keep your feet planted about shoulder-width apart and don’t be afraid to use your hips in generating as much speed as you can. This is a fun one. Let it rip!

Iron Man Throws

If the cable machine push/pull was fun, you are going to love Iron Man Throws. There are a couple variations: a standard Iron Man Throw, a throw after a hop back, or a throw after a step behind. Keep your throwing elbow high and drive it through the ball. Make sure you are throwing it against a cinderblock wall or something that won’t break when a 6-10 pound ball hits it. Dry wall will crumble!

Landmine Pull to Push

As with the first two exercises, using your legs and proper sequencing is critical for maximum benefit from this exercise. Make sure your hips are always below your shoulders and drive from your legs up and out through your hands.

Definitely make sure that you take your time with all of these exercises between sets and rest as much as you need to assure proper form and maximal speed/force with each rep. Good luck and have fun!

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Chris Finn is the founder of Par4Success and a Licensed Physical Therapist, Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, Titleist Performance Institute Certified Medical Professional and trained to perform Trigger Point Dry Needling in North Carolina. He is regarded as the premier Golf Fitness, Performance & Medical Expert in North Carolina. Since starting Par4Success in 2011, Chris has and continues to work with Touring Professionals, elite level juniors & amateurs as well as weekend warriors. He has contributed to numerous media outlets, is a published author, a consultant and presents all over the world on topics related to golf performance and the golf fitness business.

5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. Kevin

    Feb 16, 2018 at 2:48 pm

    Been following these articles closely. What advice can you offer for people who don’t have a brick wall handy to use for medicine ball exercises?

    • steve

      Feb 16, 2018 at 5:29 pm

      Don’t buy a medicine ball …. 😛 😛 😛

    • The dude

      Feb 17, 2018 at 6:12 pm

      Use the side of your neighbors house…….about 6 am

  2. OB

    Feb 15, 2018 at 6:29 pm

    “You need to understand that if you can’t rotate at your hips, spine, shoulders and neck, the exercises that follow below are not going to help.”
    Well …. that eliminates 99% of all so-called golfers worldwide …. 😀

    • steve

      Feb 16, 2018 at 5:28 pm

      Yup…. buncha stiffs whiffing at golf balls with the latest game improvement clubs. 😛

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Mondays Off

Mondays Off: Chez wins the Travelers with his own swing and holiday golf is approaching!

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Chez wins the Travelers Championship with a swing that Steve is unsure of. Talking about the Rocket Mortgage and when Knudson is going down to watch. Look out, it is holiday golf and 5.5-hour rounds are the norm!

Check out the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes or here to listen on Spotify.

Want more GolfWRX Radio? Check out our other shows (and the full archives for this show) below. 

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Opinion & Analysis

Hot & Cold: Where strokes were won and lost at the Travelers Championship

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In “Hot & Cold,” we’ll be focusing each week on what specific areas of the game players excelled and disappointed in throughout the previous tournament. On Sunday, Chez Reavie captured the second PGA Tour title of his career, and here’s a look at where some of the most notable players gained and lost strokes over the four days of action at the Travelers Championship.

Hot

Chez Reavie held off the challenge of Keegan Bradley to win his first title on the PGA Tour in over a decade, and the American’s irons were critical to his success. Reavie led the field for strokes gained: approaching the green in Connecticut, gaining 6.4 strokes over the field in this area. Check out the clubs Reavie used on his way to victory in our WITB piece here.

Jason Day returned to form last week, and the Australian excelled with his iron play for the four days of action. The 31-year-old has had issues with his ballstriking recently, but at the Travelers, Day gained 6.4 strokes over the field for his approach play – his best performance in this department since the 2016 PGA Championship.

Keegan Bradley’s putter has often been a thorn in the 33-year-old’s side, but last week in Connecticut it served him beautifully. Bradley led the field in strokes gained: putting at the Travelers, gaining a total of 9.8 strokes with the flat-stick. It snaps a streak of 11 straight events where Bradley had lost strokes on the green.

Cold

Jordan Spieth continues to struggle, and once again, the issue revolves around his long game. The Texan lost a combined total of 4.3 strokes off the tee and with his approaches at the Travelers – his worst total in this area since The Players.

Justin Thomas showed plenty of positive signs last week, with the second highest strokes gained: tee to green total in the field. However, Thomas’ putter was stone cold, and the 26-year-old lost a mammoth 7.8 strokes to the field on the greens. That number represents his worst performance of his career with the flat-stick, and Thomas has now lost strokes to the field on the greens in his last seven successive events.

Brooks Koepka struggled on his way to a T57 finish last week, with the 29-year-old losing strokes to the field off the tee, with his irons and on the green. It is the first time that Koepka has lost strokes in each of these three areas in a single event since the 2018 Tournament of Champions.

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Opinion & Analysis

The Wedge Guy: The best golf club innovations?

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Being in the golf equipment industry for nearly 40 years, I have paid close attention to the evolution of golf equipment over its modern history. While I’ve never gotten into the collecting side of golf equipment, I have accumulated a few dozen clubs that represent some of the evolution and revolution in various categories. As a club designer myself, I ponder developments and changes to the way clubs are designed to try to understand what the goals a designer might have had and how well he achieved those goals.

Thinking about this innovation or that got me pondering my own list of the most impactful innovations in equipment over my lifetime (the past 60 years or so). I want to offer this analysis up to all of you for review, critique, and argument.

Woods: I would have to say that the two that made the most impact on the way the game is played is the introduction of the modern metal wood by TaylorMade back in the 1980s, and the advent of the oversized wood with the Callaway Big Bertha in the 1990s. Since then, the category has been more about evolution than revolution, to me at least.

Irons: Here again, I think there are two major innovations that have improved the playability of irons for recreational golfers. The first is the introduction of the numbered and matched set, a concept pioneered by Bobby Jones and Spalding in the 1930s. This introduced the concept of buying a “set” of irons, rather than picking them up individually. The second would be the introduction of perimeter weighting, which made the lower lofted irons so much easier for less skilled golfers to get airborne. (But I do believe the steadfast adherence to the concept of a “matched” set has had a negative effect on all golfers’ proficiency with the higher-lofted irons)

Putters: This is probably the most design-intense and diverse category in the entire equipment industry. History has showed us thousands of designs and looks in the endless pursuit of that magic wand. But to me, the most impactful innovation has to be the Ping Anser putter, which has been…and still is…copied by nearly every company that even thought about being in the putter business. Moving the shaft toward the center of the head, at the same time green speeds were increasing and technique was moving toward a more arms-and-shoulders method, changed the face of putting forever. I actually cannot think of another innovation of that scale in any category.

Wedges: Very simply, I’ll “take the fifth” here. To me, this is a category still waiting for the revolutionary concept to bring better wedge play to the masses. The “wedges” on the racks today are strikingly similar to those in my collection dating back to a hickory-shafted Hillerich and Bradsby LoSkore model from the late 1930s, a Spalding Dynamiter from the 50s, a Wilson DynaPower from the 70s,  and so on.

Shafts: Hands down, to me the most impactful innovation is the creation of the carbon fiber, or graphite, shaft. After fruitless ventures into aluminum and fiberglass, this direction has improved the performance of golf clubs across the board. You haven’t seen a steel-shafted driver in two decades or more, and irons are rapidly being converted. Personally, I don’t see me ever playing a steel shaft again in any club – even my putter! But beyond that, I’d have to say the concepts of frequency-matching and “spine-ing” shafts made it possible to achieve near perfection in building golf clubs for any golfer.

Wild card: This has to go to the invention of the hybrid. After decades of trying to find a way to make clubs of 18-24 degrees easier to master, Sonartec and Adams finally figured this out. And golfers of all skill levels are benefitting, as this is just a better way to get optimum performance out of clubs of that loft and length.

So, there’s my review from a lifetime of golf club engineering. What can you all add to this? What do you think I missed? I hope to see lots of conversation on this one…

 

*featured image via Ping

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