Connect with us
Advertisement

Published

on

How your left wrist (for right-handed golfers) controls the club face right off the ball is very important. What Scott Hamilton talks about in this video can not only creep into a pro’s swing, but it can cause the everyday golfer a lot of issues as the swing continues back.

Your Reaction?
  • 21
  • LEGIT1
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP1
  • OB1
  • SHANK5

Athletic Motion Golf is a collaboration of four of golf's brightest and most talented instructors who came together with the sole purpose of supplying golfers the very best information and strategies to lower their scores. At AMG, we're bringing fact-based instruction that's backed by research and proven at the highest levels on the PGA Tour straight to golfers through our website. Our resources will help you "clear the fog" in your game and understand the essentials of playing great golf.

6 Comments

6 Comments

  1. Meiko

    Dec 4, 2017 at 5:47 am

    Hi, does this apply to driver, as well?

    • don

      Dec 4, 2017 at 8:58 pm

      No, it’s entirely different for the driver because of the longer shaft and bigger swing arc.

  2. Dan Jones

    Dec 1, 2017 at 9:53 pm

    Good Tip, although a bit too simplistic. Most people can relate to the position of the wrist through kinesthetic feel, in other words, a tactile learning or feel. In reality it is actually the two forearm bones, the Ulna and Radius, that are turning the wrist into position, the wrist itself should move very little other than a slight tilting towards the palm side to extend fully and prepare for forces generated during the downswing, as a fully extended wrist needs less energy to maintain position.

    One key that amateurs usually don’t understand. As humans we do everything with our hands and wrists, so we have very good awareness of them. But the hands and wrists are the biggest destroyers of good swings (I’m as guilty too, usually with short shots when I haven’t played in a while). Let the big muscles do all the work for you, the muscles in your hands and wrists are just powerful enough to destroy the rest of a good swing. Use them to hold the club and nothing else.

    If you don’t believe, try this. Go to the range and put your arms in a static position. Without the use of your arms, see how far and how accurately you can hit a ball with just your hands. Remember, the arms have to feel locked in concrete when you try it, they absolutely cannot move.

    Good Luck!
    Dan Jones, PGA

    • SK

      Dec 3, 2017 at 1:54 am

      Scott Hamilton only explains the orientation of the clubface in the takeaway and to club approaching vertical on plane. The point he makes is the left lead wrist flex is maintained until the left arm is at horizontal and only then the left wrist flattens out. Nothing more.
      There is good reason to maintain a flexed left wrist until then and it’s to control the change of leverages of the club handle.

  3. Neil

    Nov 29, 2017 at 2:10 pm

    It’s a lie angle tool, not a “face aimer.”

    • Dan Jones

      Dec 1, 2017 at 10:01 pm

      Give us Pro’s a break every now and again. Hell, one day I forgot how to write my own name, was it i before e? Or e before i? I hadn’t wrote Daniel in so long I had to stop and think about it a minute. I’m sure he knows, but in the middle of recording the video, which he did a good job mind you, it can be a little stressful. Been there, done that!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Instruction

6 ways to improve your self image as a golfer

Published

on

According to a ranking done by FanSided, The Ohio State Buckeyes are the current kings of Fandom! This ranking is not limited to sports; it also includes entertainment, celebrities and even different brands.

Growing up in Michigan, I certainly take exception to seeing The Buckeyes at No. 1, but that is certainly not the point here. I went to college with a few folks from Ohio, one who was an absolute diehard Ohio State fan. He grew up rooting for the collegiate program through both the ups and the downs. We often joked about how Ohio State could not beat Michigan when we were younger, and now the Wolverines can’t seem beat the Buckeyes. But outside of our differences, when he described every trip he made to “The Horseshoe,” you could feel his fandom. As he described the people, the food, the neighborhood and the history, you could feel the aura of “The Horseshoe.” This was a special place to him, as it is to many. Every time he left, win or lose, he could not wait to return. He was and still is a raving fan.

Unfortunately, on the lesson tee, I usually hear a different story. I rarely hear golfers describe their own game in good favor. Instead, I hear them talk poorly of every aspect of their game. I rarely hear anyone who is truly a raving fan of his or her own game. I am by no means giving anyone the green light to be arrogant, but to display confidence and develop a positive self-image. I hear plenty about how good other golfers are: Adam Scott, Rory McIlroy, even some of their buddies or co-workers who shoot no better scores than they do! The best players at any level are raving fans of their own games. So how do we change our own self-image and fall in love with our own game?

The key is understanding our mental self-image. Many people want to change their strategy. “I need new clubs. I need a better swing. I need everything!” What I want you to do is change your story. I want you to realize that inside, if you can change your mental approach from “I’m a 100’s shooter” to “I’m a bogey golfer,” you can start achieving that goal. If someone asks me what I shoot, I’ll tell them between 69 and 76. Someone who shoots 110 will tell you he shoots between 105 and 110. How can someone be that consistent with that high of a score? It’s simple; that is the game that golfer plays. It’s his self-image.

So again, how do we change it? Here are six ways to get started. 

1. Visualize Your Game

Every day, I want you to write out a scorecard. I don’t care what you use: a piece of paper, on a scorecard, on an iPhone note. What I want you to do is visualize your round. Simply think of where you normally hit your drive and where you normally hit it on the green. Play each hole normally as you would on the course. What you’ll find is that you’re not going to make any double or triple bogeys, because you’re simply playing the holes the way you have before. That will add up to a score that is 5, 10, or maybe even 15 shots lower. It will also start to give you the understanding that to shoot those scores it isn’t about perfect shots, but solid rounds of golf. If you haven’t visualized it, how can you possibly achieve it?

2. Keep Your Commitments to Yourself

Make a game plan and stick to it, case closed. Be it instruction, fitness, diet, playing more… don’t cheat yourself, just do it. Keep a journal, as journaling helps you see growth and makes it easier to stay committed.

3. Educate Yourself

We live in an information age, so choose wisely. The internet can be hard to navigate, but follow trusted sources, read books, or pick up the phone and call someone who can answer your questions. As you learn more about your game, the information will become easier to apply and you’ll see growth.

4. Be Consistent

Commit to good habits and then consistently follow through. You will start to impress yourself when it becomes routine, and when it is routine is when you see results.

5. Acknowledge and Fix Problems

I’m not saying that you should be trying to fix every problem with your golf swing. If you are giving your golf game a true assessment, however, and you’re doing what you can to address issues, you will know that you are truly doing your best.

6. Deliver on Your Game Plan +1 Percent

Ask yourself what you could do to give it the +1 percent. You don’t need to be 50 percent better. Just 1 percent can take you from satisfied to a raving fan. Commit to what you want, follow through with the commitment, add the extra 1 percent and you will be well on your way to becoming a raving fan of your own game.

Your Reaction?
  • 9
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB2
  • SHANK1

Continue Reading

Instruction

Shallowing the Club: Two Moves to Avoid (Part 1)

Published

on

It’s the move we all want in the downswing… and rightfully so. Shallowing the club is a great way to put your swing on plane and really start to narrow you misses. All shallowing moves are not equal, however; in fact, there are a couple that you’ll definitely want to try to avoid because they can actually have the opposite effect!

We’ve broken this series into two parts to make it more digestible. This is Part 1. Thank you for watching!

Shallowing the Club: Two Moves to Avoid (Part 2) is coming soon!

Your Reaction?
  • 11
  • LEGIT6
  • WOW2
  • LOL0
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP3
  • OB3
  • SHANK10

Continue Reading

Instruction

WATCH: How to hit better pitch shots by improving weight transfer

Published

on

In this video, I use technology to help you better understand how you can pitch the ball like the pros.

When pitching, you may have learned to keep your weight on your lead foot throughout the shot. That’s not always the best approach. With BodiTrak, I show you how to move your weight correctly to achieve more consistent strikes.

Your Reaction?
  • 4
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP4
  • OB0
  • SHANK3

Continue Reading

Trending