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Opinion & Analysis

Exploring the majestic New South Wales GC

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Our Australian adventure comes to an end and we finish on a high note with the crown jewel: New South Wales GC.

One of the greatest golf architects ever, Alister Mackenzie (1870-1934), designed New South Wales Golf Course back in 1928. Laid out on a beautiful piece of land located on the east side of Sydney, this is an exceptional spot for a golf course with a roaring, wild coastline framing the playground. This project must have been sky high up on any golf architect’s wishlist at that time. While looking back at it and knowing our history, who could have done a better job than Alister Mackenzie?

(C) Jacob Sjöman. jacob@sjomanart.com

The design is so pure and it has a lot of character, for example you’ve got some crazy, quirky holes that you never will forget about just based on how different they are — I am thinking of the blind tee shot on the dogleg at the third, and the 17th hole with an enormous hill that breaks the par 5 right in the middle.

Then you’ve got those majestic, scenic holes with views over the ocean to (almost) kill for. To mention just one: when you are walking up to the top of the hill on the par-5 fifth hole and looking down to the green and seeing the par-3 sixth running along the sea, it’s a real treat for your eyes and something you will never forget. Let the photo here below give you an idea.

5th Hole, Par 5 – New South Wales GC – Sydney / Australia – (C) Jacob Sjöman. jacob@sjomanart.com

We should not forget about the fun and short par-3 17th with a slippery dancefloor — a hole where it almost feel like you throw darts for the bullseye.

Add some good strategic challenges along the way, and together with the jaw-dropping tee shot on the sixth, you start to understand that you’ve ticked plenty of boxes for playing a fantastic bucket list course.

There isn’t a single part of me regretting I’ve played this course. On a clear blue sky day, we headed out and faced this big challenge, a bit of wind and looking out over the beautiful ocean on almost on every hole. It was clearly an emotional journey with a couple of double bogeys and one eagle (the short par-4 14th) and most importantly such an tremendous adventure that I will always carry with me as a sweet golfing memory.

So, if you are in Sydney, you should definitely try to get on here. In my opinion it’s a world golf bucket list course.

(C) Jacob Sjöman. jacob@sjomanart.com

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Since 2010, the tall Swede Jacob Sjöman has established himself as one of the premier golf course photographers in the world. Shooting from the ground, special high tripods, hanging out from helicopters and operating advanced drones, Jacob brings both fresh and amazing results to each project he undertakes. He has captured and left his own creative mark on some of the most recognized tracks around the world including Lofoten Links, Trump International Golf Links and now recently Gary Player's masterpiece in Bulgaria, Thracian Cliffs.

2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. freowho

    Dec 7, 2018 at 4:06 am

    It’s a shame most of your photos are of the one green. Admittedly it is probably the signature hole but the rest of the course is also worthy of some photos.

  2. Richard Tucker

    Dec 6, 2018 at 2:17 pm

    Used to be a member there when I lived in Sydney. One of the best kept secrets in world golf. Golfers talk about a 1 to maybe 3 club wind. At NSW we sometimes had to contend with up to a 6 club wind.

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Opinion & Analysis

High School reunion golf: When 58 feels like 18 again

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golf buddies reunion

Eric and David were winning our match as we approached the halfway point of the back nine at Falls Road Golf Club in Potomac, Md. But when my partner, Chip, yes, chipped in for eagle, their 15-footer for eagle suddenly seemed doubly long. David’s exuberant fist pump after draining his putt to match us said it all – the juices were flowing, and the match wasn’t going to be lost due to lackluster play or attitude. That we were paired together in a reunion tournament 40 years after the Class of 1978 graduated from Winston Churchill High School mattered not. We were athletes then – all four of us played on a Maryland state championship football team together – and, by gosh, our competitiveness was on full throttle now.

The years melted away as we traded stories about yesteryear and we learned about each other’s lives in the four-decade interim. Family and golf are shared passions, and our match showed it. While we were happily catching up in laughs and nostalgia, both teams clearly wanted to win. For bragging rights, of course. Once competitors, always competitors.

Cut to the past: David and Chip went on to play college baseball, while I stayed briefly with football, and Eric went forward playing basketball. Eric was such a gifted athlete that he not only quarterbacked our high school team to a senior year state championship (we also won it our junior year), he led the basketball team to a state title as well. A hoops scholarship to Georgetown followed, where he captained Coach John Thompson’s team his senior year. His teammates included Patrick Ewing, now Georgetown’s coach, among others. If you want to see Eric in action, Google “Michael Jordan game-winning jump shot in national championship.” You’ll find video clips of Eric (pictured below) running at Jordan a hair too late to stop His Airness from elevating and nailing the game-winning jump shot for North Carolina.

georgetown university north carolina national basketball championship 1982

Eric gets there too late to stop MJ’s game-winner in the national championship.

All to say that competition and living the athletic physical life contributed to our formation as people, and while we’re well removed from our peak years, we continue to pursue the pleasure that such activities afford. I’m still playing competitive baseball, and I’m trying to get David to join my team for the coming season, and a few other guys who I ran into at the reunion party the next night – Jimmy Flaikas, Mitch Orcutt, and Brian Hacker. How great it would be for us five former high school baseball teammates to be back on the diamond together. Priceless!

Jimmy and David have concerns about the physical demands, among other things, and whether their bodies are up to it. They’re both in great shape, so I’m confident they would do well. But they’re wise to weigh this carefully; discretion is the better part of valor when aging, after all. And that’s why golf is ideally suited to our current places in the circle of life. No torn meniscus or sprained ankles to be suffered, no concussions or broken bones forthcoming. Instead, we carelessly joked and competed with joyful appreciation of reconnecting through the game during our reunion weekend.

That golf is a lifelong game is one of its most appealing aspects. Perhaps it’s even an after-life game, as two elderly gentlemen illuminated. Lifelong friends now in their 80s, one of them fell deathly ill. His friend visited one last time and they reminisced about the good times shared through the game. As they parted, the friend said to his dying companion, “Do me a favor – let me know if there’s golf in heaven when you get there.” His friend promised he would and then he passed on peacefully that night. The next night, his friend was sleeping when he heard a voice. “I’ve got good news and bad news. The good news is, there’s golf in heaven; the bad news is, you have a tee time tomorrow morning.”

Fore! Now and forever.

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Courses

Hidden Gem of the Day: Bear Slide Golf Club in Cicero, Indiana

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These aren’t the traditional “top-100” golf courses in America, or the ultra-private golf clubs you can’t get onto. These are the hidden gems; they’re accessible to the public, they cost less than $50, but they’re unique, beautiful and fun to play in their own right. We recently asked our GolfWRX Members to help us find these “hidden gems.” We’re treating this as a bucket list of golf courses to play across the country, and the world. If you have a personal favorite hidden gem, submit it here!

Today’s Hidden Gem of the Day was submitted by GolfWRX member AUTIGER07, who takes us to Bear Slide Golf Club in Cicero, Indiana. From the horse’s mouth, Bear Slide Golf Club offers a “Scottish links-style front nine and a traditional style back nine”, and in AUTIGER07’s description of the course, he highlights the tracks excellent variety of different holes on offer.

“Played this quite a bit when I lived in Indianapolis. Was always in really solid shape and the course provides a good mix of short-to-long holes. Pace of play used to be very enjoyable, and you never felt “rushed” during the round.”

According to Bear Slide Golf Club’s website, 18 holes around the course during the week will set you back $39, while the rate rises to $55 if you want to play on the weekend.

@joel63763660

@thelgcsaa

Check out the full forum thread here, and submit your Hidden Gem.

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Podcasts

The 19th Hole (Ep 63): Valentino Dixon talks Golf Channel documentary; Marvin Bush remembers his father

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Valentino Dixon shares his amazing story in an exclusive interview with Michael Williams. Also in this episode: a tribute to George H.W. Bush, featuring a conversation with his youngest son, Marvin.

Check out the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes or here to listen on Spotify.

featured image c/o Golf Channel

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19th Hole

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