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Opinion & Analysis

Small Changes Can Bring Big Results

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Now, that October 2017 has come to a close, many golfers — both amateur and professional — have seen their seasons come to an end. Others (college golfers, PGA Tour players, and southern hemisphere residents) are entering a new season. Still others, namely 850 PGA Tour Q-School hopefuls, have seen their seasons start and end with the completion of First Stage. Another 400 Web.com Tour hopefuls will be without playing status at the end of the Q-School process.

So what do most of these millions of golfers have in common? They want, for many different reasons, to improve their games. And what will they do? Probably what they’ve done in the past. Namely, reflection, play, lessons, and practice. Same old, same old.

I think, especially if I had dropped a large chunk of change on Q-School entry fees and other tournament expenses and came away with nothing tangible to show for it, that I just might be open to a different approach to preparation and game improvement. I suggest that serious golfers take a page from other sports, military training, and successful businesses and apply a different philosophy to improving performance. In recent times, a philosophy of continuous improvement through the aggregation of marginal gains has been adopted and implemented with great success. I suggest that you go to the Harvard Business Review and read the article for background.

Now, this theory requires an analytical approach in order to identify the “critical factors” that are present and necessary for success, and then implementing a “process of continuous improvement” for each factor. The idea being that continuous improvement of as little as 1 percent to each factor will have an aggregate effect on the activity as a whole. So, what are critical factors? In the simplest definition they are the key variables, or “little things” that when taken together determine success.

“I will prepare and someday my chance will come.” 

— Abraham Lincoln

To bring some clarity to this idea, I want to draw a parallel between PGA Tour Q-School and Navy Seal training. How is this appropriate? Both programs are designed to “weed out” those not able to succeed at the next level, and they had roughly the same wash-out rates of more than 90 percent. That is, until the Navy made some significant changes in order to increase pass rates without lowering standards.

So what did the Navy do?

First, the Navy created and implemented preliminary and introductory programs that developed, improved, strengthened, and tested all necessary and desirable skill levels. These programs are now conducted over the 11 weeks just prior to the start of formal training.

Second, the Navy developed one-on-one mentoring and coaching programs while encouraging candidates to pair off as training partners to increase support and accountability.

Third, the Navy realized the importance of taking a long-term approach to training while focusing on achieving consistent gradual progress over several months, rather than trying to achieve extraordinary results immediately.

So how does what the Navy did apply to golfers?

First, you must understand that Q-School is not really an opportunity. It’s a process that eliminates about 70 percent of participants at each venue at every stage until the finals, where all 150-plus finalists will receive at least some status on the Web.com Tour for the coming year. The first real professional opportunity comes at the finals, where the top-45 will receive enough priority to ensure a good number of tournament starts and additionally, for the first time, there is a prize “purse” available for distribution. So what does as much as $15,000 in entry fees do? Try entry into a process that weeds out more than 95 percent of all those who sign up.

Second, Q-School is still just playing golf, and it is basically the same golf that’s played by millions of golfers every day on courses worldwide.

Third, “Under pressure,” according to SEAL lore, “You don’t rise to the occasion. You sink to the level of your training. That’s why we train so hard.” Bottom line, whenever a golfer plays for, or in, anything meaningful there will be pressure. Pressure to win, to succeed, not to lose or fail.

Fourth, all golfers can adopt the Navy model implementing a philosophy of “continuous improvement.”

So how can golfers implement a philosophy of “continuous improvement?”

First, identify those things that are crucial. In this system, you must marginally improve everything. For example, I have identified four major components, 12 critical factors, and 36 sub factors that apply to everyone’s game. For example, as I see it, there are four major on-course components to all golf games:

  1. Putting
  2. Scoring Shots
  3. Recovery Shots
  4. Stock Shots.

Putting is composed of three vital factors:

  1. All putts must be read correctly.
  2. All putts must start on the intended line.
  3. All putts must go the intended distance.

In my system, each of these factors has three sub factors. I will provide a list of these factors to all those who request it. Just email me at edmyersgolf@gmail.com.

Second, assign or design specific drills with measurable standards for each factor or sub-factor. I use a system known as “Deliberate Practice,” which is purposeful and systematic.

Third, keep track of goals, objectives, and progress.

“Most people miss Opportunity because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.” 

— Thomas Edison

Now for the flip side: you must be aware that the “aggregation of marginal losses” is just as powerful a phenomenon. A 1-percent decline in various skills can offset marginal gains. So no matter how hard you work, the net effect may produce less than satisfying results.

So, if you want 2018 to be different than 2017, I suggest you start improving your game sooner rather than later.

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Ed Myers is the author of Hogan’s Ghost, Golf’s Scoring Secret and The Scoring Machine. He was the Director of Instruction at Memphis National Golf Club, and he is currently the scoring coach for players on all professional tours. "The Ultimate Scoring and Performance Experience" an all day program featuring on course private instruction and unlimited play with "Hogan's Ghost." is now available. More than a "golf school"and more than just short game. Individualized evaluation determines where to start the experience. Learn and work according to your goals, preferences and ability. All practice is supervised and structured to ensure maximum benefit and verifiable results. Program runs Monday -Friday from April through October, 2018. See you in Memphis, Tenn. "The Distance Coaching Program" is now available to all level of golfers worldwide. Thanks to modern technology everyone, everywhere, can train like a touring professional. Learn more about Ed at edmyersgolf.com. He can be reached at edmyersgolf@gmail.com.

3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Ed Mellick

    Nov 6, 2017 at 11:44 am

    Excellent article from a different approach with accountability.
    If you look at the minuscule scoring average differences from all the Tours, you can see what even minuscule improvements can make in
    rankings and dollars earned.

  2. Gilles

    Nov 5, 2017 at 11:50 am

    Same advice on gripping for the last 50 years and if hasn’t sunk in by now give it up.

  3. etc.

    Nov 4, 2017 at 4:24 pm

    Putting is composed of three vital factors:
    1. All putts must be read correctly.
    2. All putts must start on the intended line.
    3. All putts must go the intended distance.
    —————
    Forget it because if you buy new model Scotty or Bettinardi, or even a Kramski putter with diamonds or sapphires embedded in the back, your $$$$$$ putter will do all that for you.

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Courses

Hidden Gem of the Day: St. James Bay Golf Club in Carrabelle, Florida

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These aren’t the traditional “top-100” golf courses in America, or the ultra-private golf clubs you can’t get onto. These are the hidden gems; they’re accessible to the public, they cost less than $50, but they’re unique, beautiful and fun to play in their own right. We recently asked our GolfWRX Members to help us find these “hidden gems.” We’re treating this as a bucket list of golf courses to play across the country, and the world. If you have a personal favorite hidden gem, submit it here!

Today’s Hidden Gem of the Day comes from GolfWRX member Bimmer1, who submitted St. James Bay Golf Club in Carrabelle, Florida as his gem of a course. Situated within the North Flordia pines, St. James Bay gets praised for both its value, quietness and excellent layout in Bimmer1’s description of the course.

“I’ve played this course for good prices over the years. Excellent and challenging layout.  I’ve been out there when there is almost no one on the course at all.  I often wonder how they have enough money to keep it in the shape they do.”

According to St. James Bay Golf Club’s website, those good prices range from $35-$59 in summer, while their winter rates drop into the $30-$45 range.

@GroupGolferFL

@StJamesBayGolf

@Porteous3187

Check out the full forum thread here, and submit your Hidden Gem.

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Courses

Hidden Gem of the Day: Aguila Golf Course in Phoenix, Arizona

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These aren’t the traditional “top-100” golf courses in America, or the ultra-private golf clubs you can’t get onto. These are the hidden gems; they’re accessible to the public, they cost less than $50, but they’re unique, beautiful and fun to play in their own right. We recently asked our GolfWRX Members to help us find these “hidden gems.” We’re treating this as a bucket list of golf courses to play across the country, and the world. If you have a personal favorite hidden gem, submit it here!

Today’s Hidden Gem of the Day was submitted by GolfWRX member evgolfer, who takes us to Aguila Golf Course in Phoenix, Arizona. The course sits at the base of South Mountain, offering up some stunning scenic mountain views, and in his description of the track evgolfer praises the fair test that the course offers up to players of all levels.

“I love it because the price is always right as a City of Phoenix municipal course. The conditions are usually fairly decent. Also, the course presents a fair challenge to me as a high handicapper and still appeals to low caps. It is easily walkable. Not surrounded by houses, not overly tight or cramped. Designed by Gary Panks. Not overly penal.”

According to Aguila Golf Course’s website, in peak time, an 18 hole round can be booked for $29, with the rate rising to $44 should you wish to add a cart. While, off-peak the price drops to $34, which includes a cart.

@TheHectorRios

@VernonLorenz

@HSTuscon

Check out the full forum thread here, and submit your Hidden Gem.

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Opinion & Analysis

This stat indicates Tiger Woods will win major 15 in 2019

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For Tiger Woods’ fans, it’s been over 10 years waiting for his 15th major victory. Even with PGA Tour win No. 80, plenty are already looking ahead to next year’s major.

Looking into Tiger’s performance at the majors in 2018, and more recently the PGA Championship, there’s exciting news for his fans. Tiger briefly held the lead at this year’s Open Championship, only to finish in a tie for sixth. But, it’s his performance at the PGA Championship, when he stormed home for second place thanks to a final round 64, and the recent statistics behind that tournament, that will get his legion of supporters brimming with confidence.

Going back to 2015, strong performances at the PGA Championship have proven to be a great form line for the following year’s major winners. In fact, if you go back further into the records, it extends for several years prior as well. Let’s take a look at recent PGA Championship results and the players that emerged from those performances that lead to major victory the next year.

The 2017 PGA Championship was one of the strongest forms lines in recent years. Justin Thomas won the tournament by two shots, but Patrick Reed, and Francisco Molinari tied for second. Reed went on to win this year’s Masters and Molinari won the Open Championship to capture their first major championships.

At the 2016 PGA Championship, Jimmy Walker surprised the field with victory, but an emerging talent in Brooks Koepka finished tied for fourth and would go on to secure his 1st major in 2017 by winning the U.S. Open. Interesting, Patrick Reed and Francisco Molinari were also just outside the top-10.

The 2015 PGA Championship was won by Jason Day, but current world No. 1 Dustin Johnson finished tied for seventh. Dustin went on to win his first major, the U.S. Open, the following year at the Oakmont Country Club. Also worth noting: Jordan Spieth finished second to Jason Day and went close to winning the Masters the next year only to finish in second place.

Fast forward to this year’s PGA Championship where Tiger finished second behind Brooks Koepka. Is it a sign that his 10-year major drought could end in 2019? And don’t forget, if Tiger has a great chance in 2019, then surely players that finished around him in that tournament, such as Adam Scott, Jon Rahm, Justin Thomas and Gary Woodland, must have high hopes for 2019 too?

All this is true and only time will tell if the tournament form line stacks up.

Anyway you look at the 2018 PGA Championship results, it’s a great form line for 2019, and Tiger could well be in the mix in the big ones next year. With his body coping well with the rigors of the tough PGA Tour circuit, Tiger Woods’ fans can be feeling good about his chances for the 2019 season.

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