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Most golf swings last less than 2 seconds, so it’s difficult to recover from any errors in the takeaway. Time is obviously limited. What most golfers fail to realize is that the force and torque they apply to the club in the initial stages of the swing can have major effects on how they are able to leverage the club with their arms and wrists.

Our research has shown that it is best to see the golfer as a series of connected links with the most consistent golfers transferring motion smoothly from one link to another and finally to the club. Approximately 19-25 percent of all the energy created in a golf swing actually makes its way into the motion of the club. That means the remaining 75-80 percent is used up in moving the body segments. This emphasizes the fact that a smooth takeaway is your best chance sequence the body links and become more efficient with your energy transfers.

In the video above, I give a very important lesson on how the forces and torques applied by the golfer in the takeaway shape the rest of the swing. There will be more to come on the subject in future articles.

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Michael Jacobs is the Director of Instruction at X Golf School and the owner of Jacobs 3D. He's was recently named on the of the 50 Best Golf Teachers in America by Golf Digest (2017-2018). He's also a Golf Magazine Top 100 Teacher in America, a Golf Digest Best Young Teacher in America, and the 2012 Metropolitan Section PGA Teacher of the Year. Jacobs is also the author of two books and the only golf professional to ever design his own golf research software program.

7 Comments

7 Comments

  1. Geohogan

    Jun 17, 2018 at 10:33 am

    Ben Hogan pointed out that “With the fulcrum(hands) at end of the shaft, the center of gravity is changed and clubhead feels much heavier”

    The balance point of the golf club becomes irrelevant once in the golfers hands(it becomes a lever)
    Golf instruction that does not recognize this is bogus. its none the less bogus because a Phd makes the same bogus claims.

    • Geohogan

      Jun 17, 2018 at 10:34 am

      Reference: page 35, 5L, Ben Hogan 1957

      “With the fulcrum(hands) at end of the shaft, the center of gravity is changed and clubhead feels much heavier”

      • Allan

        Jun 18, 2018 at 11:47 pm

        No, this is incorrect Newtonian physics. The club doesn’t become “heavier”, the resistance torque and inertia increases.

    • marv

      Jun 20, 2018 at 5:29 pm

      You are scientifically wrong and would get a big fat “F” in high school physics.

  2. stevet

    Jun 16, 2018 at 3:49 pm

    Thank you Mr. Jacobs and GolfWRX for this very informative article and video that reveals the scientific basis of the takeaway of the golf swing. This is for the thinking golfer who wants to know the real mechanics of the golf swing. Keep it coming.

    • stevet

      Jun 16, 2018 at 3:53 pm

      p.s. Micheal, could you explain the difference between ‘force’ and ‘torque’ in semi-scientific terms. Thanks again.

      • marv

        Jun 20, 2018 at 5:31 pm

        Forces go straight and torques go round… how about that?

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Here is a great video on understanding what allows a great player to get through the ball and deliver hardcore to his targets. Without this part of his grip, he would be hard-pressed to deliver anything with any kind of smash factor and compression. See what you can learn from his grip.

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In today’s age of hitting the ball as hard and as far as you can on tour, I am amazed at the number of amateur golfers who totally disregard the idea of quality impact. In fact, you can hit the ball further with better impact than you can with poor impact and more speed (to a point.) Sure, if you can kick the clubhead speed up 10 MPH-plus versus your normal speed, then this is not a requirement, but in reality most players only swing a few MPH faster when they actually try. Yes, this is true, I see it day after day. You might think you can swing 10 MPH faster but rarely do I see more than 2-3 MPH tops.

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If you can, great, if not, then go see your teaching professional and figure out why so you can find quality impact once and for all!

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Leo Rooney, Director of Performance at Urban Golf Performance, shows you how to get ready to hit balls and/or hit the golf course.

Who is Leo Rooney?

Director of Performance at Urban Golf Performance
B.Sc Exercise Physiology
TPI, NSCA

Leo Rooney played 16 years of competitive golf, in both college and professionally. He got a degree in exercise physiology and has worked with anyone from top tour players to beginners. Leo is now the Director of Performance at Urban Golf Performance and is responsible for the overall operations but still works closely with some elite tour players and the UCLA Men’s Golf Team.

He also has experience in long driving with a personal best 445-yard drive in the 2010 European Long driving Championship.

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