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Bettinardi launches new Antidote putters in 3 different head shapes

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In January of 2017, Bettinardi introduced an Antidote prototype on Tour that used weights on top of a blade-style putter to raise the center of gravity (CG) toward the equator of the golf ball for a faster end-over-end roll. At the 2017 WGC-Bridgestone Invitational in August, we spotted a new Antidote prototype; this time, it was a nearly square-mallet head, also with weights on top for the same purpose… to raise CG for a better roll.

Today, Bettinardi announced that it’s officially launching Antidote putters to retail in three different head shapes — 5 models in total.

BettinardiAntidoteGolfWRX

The Antidote putters (Model 1, Model 2 and Model 3), like the prototypes that preceded the official launch, use weights on the top half of the putters to raise CG closer to the equator of the golf ball, which Bettinardi says produces a quicker “end-over-end” rotation of the ball. The positioning of the weights also produce higher MOI (moment of forgiveness, a measure of forgiveness), which help offset off-center hits.

The retail versions of the Antidote putters have a carbon matte black finish, and they come with three weights; aluminum (5 grams), stainless steel (10 grams) and copper (15 grams). They are available today, selling for $550 each.

Check out graphic images of each of the models below.

Model 1

Model 2

Model 2 Center-Shafted

Model 2 Left-Handed

Model 3

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He played on the Hawaii Pacific University Men's Golf team and earned a Masters degree in Communications. He also played college golf at Rutgers University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.

20 Comments

20 Comments

  1. BN

    Oct 18, 2017 at 12:04 pm

    BRING BACK THE BB32

  2. Larry Cooper

    Oct 13, 2017 at 9:47 am

    I’d rather stay sick with the plague that take this Antidote. I love my BB1 and Betti blade. These are terrible. Please don’t do this again Bob.

    1,2,3 are Bad, Terrible, the worst.

  3. DB

    Oct 12, 2017 at 12:53 pm

    Hey, the Model 3 looks pretty nice. Clean and simple aside from the weights. But the website says it is 1/4 toe hang? Is that right? If you’re going to make a classic shape why not do the classic 1/2 toe hang?

  4. M. Vegas

    Oct 11, 2017 at 6:25 pm

    If these were any uglier….
    They’d be Brian’s mom

  5. MB

    Oct 11, 2017 at 5:40 pm

    I like the Number 2. That giant fly swatter works for me. I wish there was one with a flow neck

  6. BB

    Oct 11, 2017 at 1:23 pm

    If you like the square don’t sleep on the BB55. Been gaming mine for 3 years now and love it. Feel is there too, unlike many larger mallet style putters.

  7. Shawn K

    Oct 11, 2017 at 10:57 am

    Been trying to replace my Bobby Grace V-foil but nothing can touch it. Maybe the square one here as the Betti feel is as close to it as I have felt. We’ll see. Actually, I changed my mind. If it ain’t broke!

  8. cosmos411

    Oct 11, 2017 at 10:05 am

    For $550 I better be able to pick up my ball with the back of the putter!

    • Jeffrey

      Oct 12, 2017 at 2:20 am

      You should be picking it out of the hole.

      • Robert Parsons

        Oct 12, 2017 at 3:28 pm

        Maybe he wants it to come with the suction cup at the end of the grip? Hahaha

        Nobody makes suction cups like we do. Period.

        • Jeffrey

          Oct 13, 2017 at 5:48 am

          Your line up of rollers looks awesome. Is the suction cup an optional extra? LOL.

  9. Jon

    Oct 10, 2017 at 5:22 pm

    It looks like they beat PGX to the punch on this group, minus the excessive amount of screws.

    • alvin

      Oct 10, 2017 at 9:43 pm

      Plenty of ‘screws’ here, particularly for $550…..

  10. Steve I

    Oct 10, 2017 at 4:57 pm

    I’m amazed, amazed, at all the fantastic engineering that has gone into all three models.
    The square mallet headed putter has got to be the final solution to putting, not to mention the fantastic metallurgy and machining that has gone into the head.
    I love the markings on the putter soul and the pride of bagging a Made in USA putter…. and only $550 plus sales tax …. which can be amortized over the next 10 year for ~$60+ per year cost.
    It’s a steal and worth every penny for what must be a guided missile putter.

  11. Tider992010

    Oct 10, 2017 at 4:29 pm

    too much money. too much square. too much everything. Sad thing is, I love Bettinardi’s.

    • etc.

      Oct 10, 2017 at 6:50 pm

      How deep is your love for Bettinardi’s?…. share your feeelings.

  12. Milo

    Oct 10, 2017 at 3:22 pm

    Mmm, that model 2 center shafted putter looks delicious too bad I’m not spending 550 bucks on a putter.

    • etc.

      Oct 10, 2017 at 6:51 pm

      …. and they don’t even provide instructions on how to use this Antidotal putter… not really a bargain, is it?!!

      • Milo

        Oct 10, 2017 at 9:42 pm

        I’ve been gaming an OG Futura since release but switched it up this year, bought a Callaway The Tuttle for 10 bucks and sold the Futura, kinda miss the big spaceship.

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Equipment

GolfWRX Classifieds (08/05/20): Titleist TS4, Byron putter, Nike tour driver

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At GolfWRX, we love golf equipment plain and simple.

We are a community of like-minded individuals that all experience and express our enjoyment for the game in many ways. It’s that sense of community that drives day-to-day interactions in the forums on topics that range from best driver to what marker you use to mark your ball, it even allows us to share another thing – the equipment itself.

One of the best ways to enjoy equipment is to experiment and whether you are looking to buy-sell-or trade (as the name suggests) you can find almost anything in the GolfWRX BST Forum. From one-off custom Scotty Cameron Circle T putters, to iron sets, wedges, and barely hit drivers, you can find it all in our constantly updated marketplace.

These are some of the latest cool finds from the GolfWRX BST, and if you are curious about the rules to participate in the BST Forum you can check them out here: GolfWRX BST Rules

Member Golfr19 – Titleist TS4 almost new

Low Spin bomber… It’s shafted with a HZRDUS T1100 Prototype/Handcrafted 6.5 75g shaft and a genuine Titleist SureFit adapter. If you play in a lot of wind, this might really help!

To see the full listing and additional pictures check out the link here: Titleist TS4

Member ngjg21 – Byron Morgan DH89

Although he might not be a household name Byron Morgan has been producing great putters for a long time, and here is your chance to pick one up for a great price.

To see the full listing and additional pictures check out the link here: Byron DH89

Member joe2282 – Nike VR Tour driver head

One of the great classic fixed hosel Nike drivers, the VR Tour. This head is in great shape and ready for your mid-2000’s “retro” bag!

To see the full listing and additional pictures check out the link here: Nike VR Tour head

Remember that you can always browse the GolfWRX Classifieds any time here in our forums: GolfWRX Classifieds

 

 

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All-new Titleist Tour Speed golf ball builds on EXP•01 lineage

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When you are the maker of the number 1 ball in golf, it could be easy to become complacent, but the engineers at Titleist aren’t known for resting on their laurels. Instead, they are constantly looking for ways to innovate and provide performance benefits to golfers across categories, and today Titleist introduces the all-new Titleist Tour Speed golf ball.

Titleist Tour Speed golf ball: The details

Although the Tour Speed is new, many golfers might be familiar with the prototype ball that lead to the Tour Speed becoming a full-blown release—the EXP•01. It was through that extensive testing process, conducted on a scale that Titleist had never done before, that the team—including designers and engineers—had the opportunity to get valuable feedback from golfers of all skill levels. It was that direct feedback, along with controlled player testing, conducted at Titleist’s Manchester Lane R&D facility that lead to the final product.

“Every new Titleist golf ball must exceed our stringent machine and player testing targets in order to advance from the R&D phase,”  -Scott Cooper, Titleist Golf Ball R&D’s lead implementation engineer for Tour Speed.

Although the EXP•01 was released only 10 months ago, the Tour Speed has been years on the making as Titleist worked on producing a new proprietary thermoplastic urethane cover to produce the fastest ball in its market segment.

Not only is the cover material different, but the process to create the new ball involved a 4,300 square foot expansion of the Titleist Ball Plant 2, which demonstrates a huge commitment to the new Retractable Pin injection molding process and a belief in the product.

“Our golf ball scientists and engineers have gone to extraordinary lengths in the development of Tour Speed – testing numerous core formulations and aerodynamic patterns, while formulating and analyzing hundreds of TPU cover blends – to deliver on that promise. We have made every investment necessary in these new technologies, including a significant expansion of our manufacturing facility and process.” – Michael Mahoney, Vice President, Titleist Golf Ball Marketing.

Let’s talk about that performance

The Titleist Tour Speed is a three-piece thermoplastic urethane (TPU) covered ball designed to deliver distance and greater green stopping power. Titleist still believes that a cast urethane cover like those found on the Pro-V1 series offers the absolute best short game control and performance, but TPU allows them to combine enhanced distance with precise scoring control. The TPU formula used in the cover is proprietary and was formulated from scratch by Titleist’s internal team of R&D chemists to enhance distance while still maintaining feel.

The last piece of the cover puzzle is the new 346 quadrilateral dipyramid dimple design that provides a lower, more penetrating flight, so the ball is less affected by the wind.

Underneath the TPU cover sits a what Titleist calls its fastest ionomer casing layer ever, designed to create maximum speed leading to more distance.

Availability and price

The Titleist Tour Speed will be available in the U.S. at Titleist accounts beginning Friday, August 7, and they will be priced at $39.99 a dozen.

 

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Equipment

The Callaway ball plant: A legacy rooted in innovation

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A little over two years ago, I had the opportunity to visit the Callaway golf ball plant in Chicopee, Massachusetts (GolfWRX behind the scenes at the Callaway ball plant). It gave me the chance to take a deep dive into the history of not just the physical structure that is the plant but a look into the people and the machines that work to produce Callaway’s tour line of golf balls.

The one thing that stood out during that visit beyond the massive scale of the operation was the people and the pride they have in producing something in the United States for golfers to enjoy.

Chicopee & Spalding Manufacturing History

The ball plant and surrounding area where it is located is rich in manufacturing history dating back to the American revolutionary war, and the facade of the historical red brick building in Chicopee has remained mostly unchanged since it was the original Spalding manufacturing plant dating all the way back to the late 1800s. It was during this time in history when the plant produced baseballs, gloves, footballs, basketballs, tennis rackets, persimmon woods, irons—and of course golf balls, starting in 1896.

A lot of innovations relating to various sports have occurred inside of these walls and the funny thing is, Callaway’s marketing slogan for Chrome Soft— “The ball that changed the ball” could apply to a multitude of sports including:

  • Baseball – since Spalding developed the first Major League ball to become the official baseball of the National League in 1876.
  • Football – with Spalding creating the first American football with a material and workmanship guarantee in 1887.
  • Basketball – since Dr. James Naismith (Canadian—just wanted to get that in there—Go Raptors!) had the Spalding company develop the official basketball in 1894.

It is now 2020, and in the same building where all of these sporting innovations have taken place, an innovation of a new kind is underway because the ball plant has undergone multiple renovations and upgrades since 2018. Callaway has invested over $50 million in capital upgrades in order to increase quality control—and the ability to manufacture the newest Chrome Soft and Chrome Soft X balls to the highest level.

Investment in innovation

Although the plant has always operated to the highest possible level of quality control when it comes to balls, Callaway has admitted that, before 2018, there were some small holes in the production process that prevented them from reaching their potential as far as production standards go. The biggest consistency issues revolved around polymer compound mixing and the centeredness of the cores in dual-core golf balls. These weren’t wide-sweeping issues but they were enough of a problem, Callaway knew they needed to be addressed as quickly as possible, especially if they wanted to continue to innovate in the competitive golf ball market.

In an effort to not just be equal to the competition but to surpass them, the initial investment was in state-of-the-art machines that could take and process 3D X-Ray to measure ball construction and the core centeredness of every single ball. It is during this automated process, that if any ball shows an issue, then it is removed from the final stages of production and will never find its way into a golfer’s bag.

The biggest investment though came in the form of an all-new synthetic polymer mixer allowing Callaway engineers and plant staff to monitor parts of the process with a level of precision that they never could before. Now, if it wasn’t obvious by the pictures, this is not the type of machine that you can just pick up at a local “golf ball plant supply store”— these types of mixers are multiple stories high and offer the same type of precision you would find in the medical industry.

When it comes to the unassuming red brick building, it’s what’s inside that counts. And speaking of “inside,” Callaway engineers are now able to precisely control all of the compounds that go into producing golf ball cores. With the state-of-the-art mixer now in place on the factory floor, from the very start of production through to the final packaging, every Callaway ball is manufactured to the highest level of quality available in the industry.

The state of the art mixer now in place on the factory floor means that from the very start of production through to the final packaging, every Callaway ball is manufactured to the highest level of quality available in the industry.

Technology on the inside and outside

The other part of the plant that continues to see large investments is the Truvis and Triple Track printing area. As we touched on in the original piece, what was perceived by many to at first be a bit of a gimmick, including some of Callaway’s own employees, has proven to be an absolute slam dunk. The pentagon pattern provides a tangible benefit by creating an optical illusion that makes the ball look bigger and also gives visual feedback for short game shots and putting. If you haven’t tried chipping around a green with a Truvis ball, I highly suggest it—you can actually see how much difference in spin you create hitting various shots.

What started as a toe-dip with one machine has turned into an area of the plant with more than a dozen, with Callaway also producing Truvis balls with custom colors and logos.

What followed Truvis was the development of Callaway Triple Track, which is three high-resolution parallel lines printed onto the golf ball to help with alignment. It would not have been possible to print this alignment tool without the machines that were developed to precisely print the Truvis patterns. Triple Track has been so popular and effective for golfers that this year, Callaway even introduced the alignment tool onto a number of their Stroke Lab putter models.

Odyssey Stroke Lab 2-Ball with Triple Track

If history is any indication, this investment will continue to push golf ball innovation for Callaway, as well as continue to build on the strong legacy of proud American manufacturing in Chicopee, Massachusetts. To take an inside look inside of the newly renovated plant, as well as get a deeper understanding of the history and the people behind Callaway golf balls, check out their mini-documentary below.

The Ball that Changed a Town

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