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Ben Crane receives 8-shot penalty for launch monitor stickers

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Ben Crane received an 8-shot penalty at the Web.com Tour’s Alberstsons Boise Open for launch monitor stickers he had on two of his golf clubs.

Technically, Crane received a pair of 4-shot penalties, as he did not discover that he had the stickers on two of his clubs (his driver and his 6-iron) until later in the round. Crane explains in the video below.

Related: The Hottest Launch Monitors of 2017

Let that be a lesson to golfers with access to a launch monitor. If you use stickers, take them off before you play… at least if it’s a competitive round.

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14 Comments

14 Comments

  1. Mike

    Oct 2, 2017 at 5:55 pm

    Fake news, the stickers mean and effect nothing unless being read by the launch monitor

  2. Webby

    Sep 18, 2017 at 1:13 pm

    The rules are the rules, Crane should be applauded for notifying the officials; obviously he knew it was a technical illegality.

    Golfers, most of us, are keenly aware of such rules and would rather be penalized for an oversight than to be thought of or accused of cheating.

    Bravo Ben, now get your PGA Tour card back.

  3. John Krug

    Sep 18, 2017 at 12:46 pm

    Another reason why golf has declined in popularity.

    • Ron

      Sep 18, 2017 at 3:48 pm

      Ahhh the inevitable comment when there’s any type of technical rules violation. As if one really has to do with the other

  4. Quine Duhem

    Sep 18, 2017 at 11:44 am

    This is proof that the rules of golf need simplifying. In cases such as this where no advantage is gained and where no deliberate attempt to cheat occur, the rules should allow the the officials to waive any penalties. How complicated is that?

  5. Chirpy

    Sep 17, 2017 at 5:23 pm

    First world problems.

  6. Johnnylongballz

    Sep 17, 2017 at 7:29 am

    The USGA and R&A need to learn how to make the punishment fit the crime. SMH

  7. Chris B

    Sep 17, 2017 at 3:44 am

    It must have given him a massive advantage having those stickers on his club.

  8. Rich

    Sep 16, 2017 at 6:14 am

    When will the madness end. What a stupid ruling/rule. Bad luck Ben Crane.

  9. Rob

    Sep 15, 2017 at 3:33 pm

    Yet ANOTHER reason I sold my GC2 & upgraded to Trackman.

    (And yes, I do play in competitive golf tournaments)

  10. TR1PTIK

    Sep 15, 2017 at 1:37 pm

    Which rule was used to assess the penalty?

  11. Andrew

    Sep 15, 2017 at 11:25 am

    What’s the difference between stickers and lead tape?

    • Joe Perez

      Sep 18, 2017 at 10:41 am

      I believe it has to do with applying something (the stickers) to the *face* of the club. Lead tape is put on the bottom, back.

  12. Steve

    Sep 15, 2017 at 10:35 am

    This is bonkers. What in the christ would stickers possibly do to affect a swing during a round?

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19th Hole

68 at the British Open in the morning, golf with hickories at St Andrews in the afternoon

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Yes, golf fans, just another day in the charmed life (or week, at least) of one Brandon Stone.

Stoney (as I assume his friends call him), came to Carnoustie on the heels of a final-round 60 to win the Scottish Open. All he did in his opening round was fire a 3-under 68. Not bad!

But his Thursday to remember was only getting started as Stone made the 25-mile trip south to the Old Course to peg it…with a set of hickory clubs! Well played, sir, well played.

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Jean van de Velde’s 1999 British Open collapse is still tough to watch in LEGO form

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Gather ‘round, golf fans, for the saddest British Open story ever told–in LEGOs.

Maestro of the plastic medium, Jared Jacobs, worked his singular magic on Jean van de Velde’s notorious final-hole collapse at Carnoustie in 1999.

The interlocking plastic brick cinema begins after van de Velde’s approach shot has caromed off a grandstand railing to land on the opposite side of the Barry Burn.

 

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Sung Kang finally responds to cheating allegations

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Sorry to interrupt your regularly scheduled British Open programming, but Sung Kang stated today he still doesn’t think he didn’t anything wrong. “I followed the rules by the rules official…I think I did the right thing,” he said after his opening round at The Open.

Joel Dahmen, if you recall, accused the 31-year-old pro of taking a bad drop at the 10th hole during the final round of the Quicken Loans National.

The comments were Kang’s first public remarks since a statement co-released with the PGA Tour which said, “He is standing by the ruling that was made by PGA Tour Rules officials on Sunday and will have no further comment.”

While he stopped short of giving his side of the story, Kang did indeed make “further comment.”

Here’s some of what he said.

“I did not want to say anything bad about Joel. Because there can be difference of opinions. But the way he just said it on Twitter was not right. There can be different opinions. And also, it was made a decision by the rules official. So nothing was wrong.”

“I really want to say a lot of things about it, the truth about what happened, but no comment because I’m not going to say anything. I think I made the right decision. … Even when I say something, a few people still kind of think i still did something wrong. And if someone believes in me, they aren’t going to trust what Joel said.”

“No matter what I say, some people are going to trust it, some people are not going to trust it. And then I’m going to be thinking about it more and more. So I’m just focusing on my golf game.”

The British press asked Kang if he wishes he had done anything differently.

“No. Why? I did the right thing,” Kang replied.

Now, I’m not here to argue one way or the other, but the rules official wasn’t in position to do anything other than leave things at the player’s discretion, which he did. So, it’s misleading–if not downright deceptive–for Kang to suggest otherwise.

The official didn’t see the shot. There was no video of it. The only thing he had to rely on was the accounts of those who did see it. In a situation where accounts vary, and with the Rules of Golf relying on player integrity as they do, all he could do was leave the ball in Kang’s court. Thus, the decision as to where to drop was wholly Sung Kang’s.

Again, this isn’t to say the drop was necessarily bad, bad to play the “decision by the rules official” card is, well, a bad drop.

 

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