In May 2017, GolfWRX Contributor Adam Crawford published a story titled, “Is the future of golf hiding in Trackman’s code.” It detailed a new technology from Trackman called “Trackman Range,” which was at the time was only available in the company’s home country of Denmark.

Imagine walking onto a driving range, setting your bag down behind a selected spot of turf, and pulling your phone out. You scroll through your apps and select the Trackman app. Once you log on to the app, you’ll be connected to the Trackman server at said range, and then you’ll be prompted to hit a calibration shot. You take a swing, look at your phone once more, and the prompt will ask you, “Was this your shot?” You confirm it is and then you’re locked in.

Now for the next however long you’re at the range, Trackman will provide you the same data the pros are getting for each and every shot with the data hub right on your phone. While you’re checking your numbers, it will also be doing the same exact thing, at the same exact time, for the 75 other golfers hitting balls down range. And you didn’t have to pay a penny extra.

U.S. golfers don’t have to imagine this technology anymore… that is, if they’re willing to visit the Detroit area. Trackman has entered a partnership with Carl’s Golfland, a Michigan-based golf retailer and practice facility, to install its Range Solution at the company’s 15-acre Bloomfield Hills practice facility. The technology will offer golfers real-time stats for launch angle, ball speed, carry and total yards from the Trackman app, which golfers can download for free. Club head data won’t be available, but according to Trackman, future enhancements of single and multi-player range games will be offered “soon.”

As a Metro Detroit native, I’m ecstatic to have this technology available in my backyard. As much fun as places like TopGolf are, they’re no substitute for a Trackman range session. I hope this technology spreads.

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Zak is the Editor-in-Chief of GolfWRX.com. He's been a part of the company since 2011, when he was hired to lead GolfWRX's Editorial Department. Zak developed GolfWRX's Featured Writer Program, which supports aspiring writers and golf industry professionals.

He played college golf at the University of Richmond (Go Spiders!) and still likes to compete in tournaments. You can follow Zak on Twitter @ZakKoz, where he's happy to discuss his game and all the cool stuff that's part of his job.

17 COMMENTS

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  1. “how quickly the world owes him something that he knew exisited 10 seconds ago” -Louis C.K. couldnt help but think of this bit when I read your comment. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q8LaT5Iiwo4 (at 2:00)

    This amazing technology that was originally created to track missiles, is being made available to you at no additional cost, so you can track a little white ball, and it can tell you with amazing accuracy how far, fast, at what height, and what launch angle you are hitting it. And all you can do is complain about what you can’t have.

    No wonder so many people hate golfers and think we’re spoiled eliteist jerks…

  2. Only 1/2 of 1% of golfers worldwide can benefit from Trackman and the rest just stay on the range and hit buckets of balls until they attain some semblance of consistency. A lesson might also help.

      • Of course I would pay extra for the current data and more for more data. Given all the info radar – Flightscope and Trackman – offers, just these data points are great, I’m glad to have them, but not unreasonable to expect more paid options.

  3. I love the idea. This is going to destroy the average golfer’s ego due to the fact that trackman will give them real yardages on how far they actually hit their clubs. This might be discouraging to some who thought they hit the ball further/better than they actually do.

  4. If the range is using a decent “real” ball (that Trackman has programmed) that they do not allow to wear out too much then this idea is awesome. Of course, if the range balls are worn out, one now has a perfect location to unload those shag balls at the end of their range session to get “real” numbers. Definitely a move in a better direction for what ranges can be used for. Of course, I’m expecting a lot of golfers will adamantly resist the numbers being sent by Trackman as they see how far they actually hit their clubs …

    • Trackman has a “normalization” tool for Premium golf balls when you are hitting range balls – range balls aren’t really an issue as Trackman accounts for the changes in spin, LA, ball speed, etc

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