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Mizuno’s New S18 Wedges: Different Lofts, Different Designs

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When deciding on your wedge setup, it’s important to not only think about yardage gapping, but to find wedges that achieve the necessary performance for that specific wedge. For example, you want a 46-degree wedge to perform more like an iron that will be used on full shots, while your 60-degree wedge should have a more versatile grind for not only shots from the fairway, but also open-faced shots from various lies around the greens.

Since the launch of its MP-T10 wedges, which introduced loft-specific grooves, Mizuno has sought to build wedges for golfers that satisfy the needs of each specific loft. With its T5 wedges, Mizuno made loft-specific grinds, and with its T7 wedges, it designed loft-specific head shapes.

Now, Mizuno’s new S18 wedges combine all of those loft-specific concepts from recent wedge lines — with specific groove, grinds and head shapes — and have made other improvements, as well.

The center of gravity for each wedge now flows upward through the set to achieve the proper flight for those lofts; lower-lofted S18 wedges have a lower center of gravity (CG) for a higher flight and lower spin rates, while higher-lofted wedges have a higher CG for a lower, more-controlled flight and more spin.

MizunoS18wedgesProfile

Mizuno is using also its familiar “quad-cut grooves” on the S18 wedges, but with some changes compared to older models to make the S18 set more progressive. Now, the lower-lofted wedges have narrower and deeper grooves for better performance on full shots, while the higher-lofted wedges have wider and shallower grooves for better performance on shorter shots. Mizuno has also given the higher-lofted wedges more sole grind for versatility, and lower-lofted wedges less sole grind for iron-like performance.

With the goal to increase durability and spin throughout the line, Mizuno also tested older wedges — using Luke Donald’s old S5 wedge head design as a benchmark, according to Mizuno — with newer materials and designs. Mizuno found that adding boron to its 1025 mild carbon steel made it 30 percent stronger, which will help it perform better for a longer duration. Therefore, the S18 wedges are made with 1025 Boron.

Graphic courtesy of Mizuno

Graphic courtesy of Mizuno

You’ll also notice head shapes that blend the aggressive design — or more contours and sharper lines — of the S5 wedges, and the more conservative design of the T7. The S18 wedges satisfy the middle ground, which is likely to appeal to a greater amount of golfers.

Mizuno’s S18 wedges will be available in Chrome, and a “Gunmetal” black IP (Ion Plated) finish. They will sell at retail for $149 per wedge starting September 15, and will come stock with a True Temper Dynamic Gold wedge-flex shaft and a Golf Pride MCC Black/White 60Round grip. Check out the full spec options below.

Stock SKU’s

MizunoSKU

Custom Offerings (Click to Enlarge)

MizunoCustomSpecsS18

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3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. DrRob1963

    Aug 17, 2017 at 7:28 pm

    These new Mizuno wedges look fabulous. I love my old MP-T7 64* lobbie with 7* bounce, but the grooves are starting to wear. Is there a 64* wedge available? If not, is the most lofted wedge bendable to give 64* loft, and then, what would the clubs bounce become?

    • TG

      Aug 17, 2017 at 8:40 pm

      For every degree of loft you add it adds a degree of bounce is also added.

      • DrRob1963

        Aug 18, 2017 at 6:51 am

        Sure, but what wedge do I get and is it bendable? Is there a 64* loft option???

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Equipment

Forum Thread of the Day: “Most forgiving driving iron?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from aceo36 who asks fellow members for their choice of most forgiving driving iron. Plenty of different driving irons receive a mention, with Srixon’s U65 proving to be one of the most popular choices.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • Jwin323: “I just got a Ping G410 Crossover 2, and it’s pretty forgiving. Very easy to hit off the deck because of its sole camber.”
  • thekiwii: “The bigger, the more forgiving. The ping crossover series is probably the biggest. Adams DHy is very under the radar and underrated. You can hunt one down for cheap. Titleist TMB is small, but it has tungsten weighting to increase the forgiveness.”
  • arobbins3: “I play the Srixon U65, and it’s the most forgiving one I’ve played (T-MB, Taylormade, etc.).”
  • ScottJN: “I picked up the u85 on a whim, got the stock recoil shaft and it flies higher than I’d like on a typical shot.  However, the club is so easy to hit and an automatic 250 off the tee (2iron).”

Entire Thread: “Most forgiving driving iron?”

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Equipment

GolfWRX Spotlight: P2 putter grips

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Product: P2 putter grips

Pitch: From P2: “The patented P2 technology is based on the way the shaft is housed through the bottom of the grip. This effectively elevates the golfer’s hands at address, locks the wrists in place and creates sought after shaft-forearm symmetry.”

Our take on P2 putter grips

Putting is the one part of golf that truly levels the playing field – a sliding two-footer is worth just as many shots as a 345-yard drive, and from beginner to pro, we’ve all experienced the simple agony of missing one we know we really should have made. With so much recent focus on redefining putter technology the one part of the club that is still highly overlooked is the grip — but P2 is trying to change that.

The key part of the P2 design is the Bottom Shaft Housing that positions the grip asymmetrically around the shaft – on the vertical plane (don’t worry the grip are 100 percent symmetrical). This design, fully legal under the rules of golf, has scientifically proven through the use of Quintic, results that show both improved strike pattern on the face as well as getting more putts started on line at the intended target.

Part of the reason this design helps golfers putt more consistently is that it puts the putter more inline and on plane with the forearm to help create a single motion. As much as we would all love a putting stroke that flows as smoothly as Ben Crenshaw or Brad Faxon the amount timing needed in the hands to produce great results through these methods is often too difficult even for the better player to achieve. In a way, the P2 Grip design helps you get into an “armlock” position without fully overhauling your putting technique (and it allows you to keep your current putter).

In my personal testing, I decided to use the P2 Core Classic. This was my preferred grip since it offers the smaller width while giving the full experience of the Botton Shaft Housing tech. My putter specs are generally flatter than most with a lie angle around 68 degrees, when using a traditional grip this results in having the butt end point more towards my belly button and, as I’m fully willing to admit, a more rotational stroke. I never had to adjust any of the specs on my putter to get the grip to do exactly what it says it will. The grip plane became more aligned with my forearm and after a small adjustment period to the new shape, I was 100 percent making a more pendulum stroke with less arc. So far, results inside have proven to be a success, and I’m looking forward to taking it out to the course once the season really gets started.

Within the P2 lineup, there are four shapes and two weight categories to choose from to allow the player to find the exact fit for both grip method and balance. The original “Core” series is on the heavier side of the grip weight spectrum, but for many players using modern heavier putter heads this could be a huge advantage to help give your putter a higher balance point, and at the end of the day, produce a smoother putting stroke. As the current trend of research from multiple OEMs has proven, a higher balance point through weight distribution can lead to some big improvements in stroke consistency.

Whether its a claw, cross-handed, or more of a traditional grip method you use, there is a P2 grip that should fit your style and hopefully help you sink a few more putts.

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Apparel Reviews

WRX Spotlight: Puma polos

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Product: Puma polos

Pitch:  From Puma “A world leader in high-performance sports clothing, Puma launched their first golf collection in 2004 complete with Puma golf shoes and clothing. The collection has gone from strength to strength ever since its creation, with tour pro golfers wearing the range out on the course. With bold colorful clothing to classically sporty and smart pieces, Puma golf is a versatile collection certain to appeal to golfers of all preferences.”

Our take on Puma’s polos

It’s difficult to look past Puma’s 2019 polo collection without seeing its Paradise golf shirt. Showcased by Rickie Fowler during the Island stretch of golf to begin the new year, the unconventional all button up shirt may not be to everyone’s taste, but anyone who pulls the shirt on will likely agree on its comfort. The shirt will channel your inner Ned Flanders, “feels like I’m wearing nothing at all,” and the ultra-lightweight feel combined with the looseness makes it an ideal summer shirt for swinging the club freely on the golf course.

Puma has a lot more polos on offer in 2019 than its Paradise shirt though, and one of the most visually striking shirts of theirs is the Aletknit Radius Golf Polo. The shirt comes in three vibrant colors (blue, white and green), and its camo inspired pattern is subtle and discreet which gives the shirt a cool look without being distracting. Also a lightweight polo, the Aletknit Radius Golf Polo features a clean three button look, as well as a very comfortable fit, and its dryCell technology means you won’t be drenched in sweat this summer.

Then there’s the Rotation Golf Polo which comes in both solid and stripes styles. The shirts offer a very modern feel and look, and you certainly won’t be disappointed with the selection of colors which the shirts come in, with an abundance on offer.

On the throwback front, Puma has you covered with their Nineties Golf Polo, with a striped shirt style and color. There are five different color blocks to choose from which are about as representative of spring/summer as I’ve seen, and the shirts also come with Ultraviolet Protection Factor, which is a nice summer touch.

The Faraday Polo is according to the company itself “one of our best”. Lightweight and one of the softest shirts they provide, it’s hard to disagree with them in terms of comfort level. The only off-putting feature of this shirt for me is the odd unfinished lining around the pocket.

The exhaustive selection of golf polos provided by Puma is impressive, and they’ve covered everything you’d want in a golf shirt in each of their styles. Prices range from $50-$70, and no matter what your taste, you’re bound to find a great summer golf shirt to add to your collection from their 2019 lineup.

 

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