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Mizuno’s New S18 Wedges: Different Lofts, Different Designs

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When deciding on your wedge setup, it’s important to not only think about yardage gapping, but to find wedges that achieve the necessary performance for that specific wedge. For example, you want a 46-degree wedge to perform more like an iron that will be used on full shots, while your 60-degree wedge should have a more versatile grind for not only shots from the fairway, but also open-faced shots from various lies around the greens.

Since the launch of its MP-T10 wedges, which introduced loft-specific grooves, Mizuno has sought to build wedges for golfers that satisfy the needs of each specific loft. With its T5 wedges, Mizuno made loft-specific grinds, and with its T7 wedges, it designed loft-specific head shapes.

Now, Mizuno’s new S18 wedges combine all of those loft-specific concepts from recent wedge lines — with specific groove, grinds and head shapes — and have made other improvements, as well.

The center of gravity for each wedge now flows upward through the set to achieve the proper flight for those lofts; lower-lofted S18 wedges have a lower center of gravity (CG) for a higher flight and lower spin rates, while higher-lofted wedges have a higher CG for a lower, more-controlled flight and more spin.

MizunoS18wedgesProfile

Mizuno is using also its familiar “quad-cut grooves” on the S18 wedges, but with some changes compared to older models to make the S18 set more progressive. Now, the lower-lofted wedges have narrower and deeper grooves for better performance on full shots, while the higher-lofted wedges have wider and shallower grooves for better performance on shorter shots. Mizuno has also given the higher-lofted wedges more sole grind for versatility, and lower-lofted wedges less sole grind for iron-like performance.

With the goal to increase durability and spin throughout the line, Mizuno also tested older wedges — using Luke Donald’s old S5 wedge head design as a benchmark, according to Mizuno — with newer materials and designs. Mizuno found that adding boron to its 1025 mild carbon steel made it 30 percent stronger, which will help it perform better for a longer duration. Therefore, the S18 wedges are made with 1025 Boron.

Graphic courtesy of Mizuno

Graphic courtesy of Mizuno

You’ll also notice head shapes that blend the aggressive design — or more contours and sharper lines — of the S5 wedges, and the more conservative design of the T7. The S18 wedges satisfy the middle ground, which is likely to appeal to a greater amount of golfers.

Mizuno’s S18 wedges will be available in Chrome, and a “Gunmetal” black IP (Ion Plated) finish. They will sell at retail for $149 per wedge starting September 15, and will come stock with a True Temper Dynamic Gold wedge-flex shaft and a Golf Pride MCC Black/White 60Round grip. Check out the full spec options below.

Stock SKU’s

MizunoSKU

Custom Offerings (Click to Enlarge)

MizunoCustomSpecsS18

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3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. DrRob1963

    Aug 17, 2017 at 7:28 pm

    These new Mizuno wedges look fabulous. I love my old MP-T7 64* lobbie with 7* bounce, but the grooves are starting to wear. Is there a 64* wedge available? If not, is the most lofted wedge bendable to give 64* loft, and then, what would the clubs bounce become?

    • TG

      Aug 17, 2017 at 8:40 pm

      For every degree of loft you add it adds a degree of bounce is also added.

      • DrRob1963

        Aug 18, 2017 at 6:51 am

        Sure, but what wedge do I get and is it bendable? Is there a 64* loft option???

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WRX Spotted at U.S. Open: Justin playing just Rosey with new TPT

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We are a little more than halfway through the U.S. Open at Pebble Beach, and so far the course is giving and taking as much as you would expect from a perfect setup by the USGA.

Taking the lead on Thursday and continuing to lurk into the weekend is Justin Rose. Since we have been paying close attention to his Honma golf bag all year, we noticed a shaft change in his Tour World driver.

We reached out to TPT to see if we could get an update on what Rose has put in play for what is often referred to as one of the toughest driving weeks of the year. Here’s the inside info

“Justin has put into play a TPT Golf 14 MKP-LT-SW shaft in his Honma driver. This shaft is a full 10 CPM ( Cycles per Minute ) stiffer than the 15 LKP-LT-SW shaft that he put in play at The Memorial after testing it that week. It’s also different in that it has a Mid Kick Point (MKP), where as the 15 LKP-LT-SW has a Low-Kick-Point (LKP) design.”

From a technical and fitting perspective (generally speaking) a lower kick point shaft will hit the ball higher with more spin compared to a mid or high kick point shaft if all other factors are equal. We don’t have access to his driver numbers but with the U.S. Open being played on what can always end up as a windy venue the theory would be that this change to the MKP is to help keep ball flight lower and more controlled — which will also be a benefit next month at the Open Championship.

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Forum Thread of the Day: “Best budget driver?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from Ivyguy who is on the lookout for the best driver to be had at an affordable price ($300 or less). Our members give their suggestions, with plenty of different drivers getting a mention.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • tbsbama: “Cobra King LTD is a wonderful driver. The pro model has lofts from 7 to 10 with fade settings. The regular from 9 to 12 with draw settings. Both heads are absolute bombers and can be found pretty cheap. Best driver I have hit in several years.”
  • zzyzxx33: “I won a Tour Edge EXS Driver, and it has been Awesome! Great Price, Look, Sound and Results! It’s longer than anything else I’ve hit.”
  • AG12: “I would say the regular PING G400…you can get new for $300 on PGA SS website, ’17 M2 is a good choice, and the M4 can be had at under $300 used in most shops.”
  • Badshaft: “I have the F8+ and bought the extra weights off of eBay (inexpensive, shipped from China)- 12g front 7g back- Blue Tensei 70g stiff. Longest for me – straight and as accurate as anything. Nice well-balanced combo. Looks to me it has the same moveable weight strategy as the F9.”

Entire Thread: “Best budget driver?”

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Xander Schauffele using a new Odyssey Stroke Lab Tuttle putter at this week’s U.S. Open

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At this week’s U.S. Open, Xander Schauffele made the move to a new Odyssey Stroke Lab Tuttle putter as he looks to break his major duck.

The 25-year-old had been using a Stroke Lab R-Ball gamer since March but tested out the Odyssey Stroke Lab Tuttle flat-stick at the beginning of the week. According to Callaway, Schauffele likes how the three lines are designed all the way from the front to the back of the putter head to help frame the ball for the proper setup and better alignment.

The change paid dividends on day one at Pebble Beach, with the Californian firing a round of 66 to put him T2 overnight.

Much of Schauffele’s excellent work on day one was done with the new Odyssey Stroke Lab Tuttle, with the 25-year-old gaining 4.8 strokes on the greens during Thursday’s action. Schauffele currently stands second in strokes gained: putting.

 

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