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We need so much more of this on the PGA Tour

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I realize these guys are playing for huge purses, and that second-place prize money is a life-changing amount. They have families and friends to provide for, and they need to think about FedExCup Points and Presidents Cup Standings; they need to secure their career and bank accounts, and I get it.

But there’s nothing more entertaining than the pure, unadulterated will to win.

That’s exactly what Charley Hoffman showed on Sunday at the 2017 WGC-Bridgestone Invitational, when he decided to go for the green on the par-5 667-yard hole No. 16 while sitting three shots back of eventual champion Hideki Matsuyama. The pre-shot exchange with his caddie was even more telling about his mindset, and will to win; or at least the will to not finish second (again).

“I’m trying to win a golf tournament,” Hoffman said. “”I’m tired of finishing second.”

Hoffman went on to make a disappointing par on the hole, ultimately finishing in third place, six strokes behind Matsuyama. But he showed a lot of determination by taking on the shot that could have cost him a lot of money, and he showed what Skip Bayless would call the “clutch gene” by actually pulling off the shot.

If you ask Brandel Chamblee, this type of decision-making down the stretch may have helped Ian Poulter win the 2017 Players Championship.

Moral of the story: If you have a chance to win — whether it’s a PGA Tour event or your local club championship — embrace the opportunity.

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He played on the Hawaii Pacific University Men's Golf team and earned a Masters degree in Communications. He also played college golf at Rutgers University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.

2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Boyo

    Aug 8, 2017 at 6:56 am

    His chip shot wasn’t anything to write home about…

  2. TR1PTIK

    Aug 7, 2017 at 1:05 pm

    That shot was clutch and the exchange between those guys was absolutely hilarious! Too bad, Hoffman couldn’t take advantage and make run at it.

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19th Hole

Tweets of the Week: Stenson snaps, Rose’s shank of the year, and G-Mac loses his temper

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Shane Lowry produced the performance of his life to win the 2019 Open Championship at Royal Portrush, but in a great week of golf, here are some of the things you may have missed, and some of the quirkier moments from the world of golf dished out in the Twittersphere over the past seven days.

Impressions From The Open

Conor Moore on point as always!

Rose’s Shank Of The Year

The Englishman keeping the cameraman on his toes.

Matt Wallace And His Hero

Stenson Snaps

Beautiful technique from the big Swede.

G-Mac’s Frustration

When you find your ball 12 seconds too late…

Zach Appears On Phireside With Phil

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19th Hole

Brooks Koepka expresses his frustration over J.B. Holmes’ slow play at The Open

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Brooks Koepka began 2019 by calling out golf’s authorities for their lack of action over the slow play issue surrounding the game, and on Sunday at the Open Championship, the 29-year-old appeared visibly agitated over the speed of playing partner J.B. Holmes.

The two men teed off at 1.37 PM local time in the final round, and from their opening tee shots of the day, which Holmes would take significantly longer to play than his compatriot, it appeared the two could be in for an uncomfortable day with each other.

For the most part during Sunday’s final round, on the course, Koepka was to keep whatever frustrations which were bubbling under the surface to himself.

However, coming off the 12th green, the four-time major champ was seen staring at a rules official while motioning to his imaginary wristwatch, and on another occasion, the American looked less than impressed as his playing partner went through his deliberate putting routine.

Following their round, the 29-year-old was quick to point out that Holmes is far from being the only slow player on Tour, but explained what his biggest gripe was with the Kentuckian on Sunday at Royal Portrush – his inability to prepare when it wasn’t his turn.

“There are a lot of slow guys out here, that’s not the first time I’ve done it, especially when you’ve got a walking official with you. I’m ready to go most of the time.

That’s what I don’t understand when it’s your turn to hit, your glove is not on, then you start thinking about it, that’s where the problem lies. It’s not that he takes that long. He doesn’t do anything until his turn. That’s the frustrating part. But he’s not the only one that does it out here.”

Holmes’ nightmare performance didn’t help his pace of play as he struggled mightily in the harsh conditions during Sunday’s final round. The 37-year-old shot an 87 – 16 over par to move from third place at the start of the day to fourth last on six over.

Koepka had some sympathy for Holmes’ struggles in the wind and rain in Northern Ireland, but despite this, the Florida native made it clear that he still found the pace at times too slow.

“He had a rough day, but JB is a slow player. We were on pace for 13 holes, but if I’m in the group we’re going to be on pace no matter what. But there were some times where I thought it was slow.”

Koepka’s final round of 74 secured a T4 finish for the four-time major champ to complete an exceptional year at the major tournaments which included a win at the PGA Championship at Bethpage Black in May.

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19th Hole

How much each player won at the 2019 Open Championship

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Irishman Shane Lowry produced a fairytale victory at Royal Portrush, winning by six strokes and claiming the title of 2019 Champion Golfer of the Year. There was no stopping the man from Co. Offaly as he surged to victory on Sunday afternoon in the north of Ireland, and Lowry took home just shy of $2 million in prize money in the process.

This year’s Open Championship prize purse was raised to a total of $10.75 million, with this year’s champion pocketing almost $500,000 more than last year’s winner, Francesco Molinari.

Here we take a look at how much each player who played all 72 holes earned at the 2019 Open Championship.

1: Shane Lowry, 269/-15, $1,935,000

2: Tommy Fleetwood, 275/-9, $1,120,000

3: Tony Finau, 277/-7, $718,000

T4: Brooks Koepka, 278/-6, $503,500

T-4: Lee Westwood, 278/-6, $503,500

T-6: Rickie Fowler, 279/-5, $313,000

T-6: Tyrrell Hatton, 279/-5, $313,000

T-6: Robert MacIntyre, 279/-5, $313,000

T-6: Danny Willett, 279/-5, $313,000

10: Patrick Reed, 280/-4, $223,000

T-11: Tom Lewis, 281/-3, $171,700

T-11: Francesco Molinari, 281/-3, $171,700

T-11: Alex Noren, 281/-3, $171,700

T-11: Jon Rahm, 281/-3, $171,700

T-11: Justin Thomas, 281/-3, $171,700

T-16: Lucas Bjerregaard, 282/-2, $126,313

T-16: Ryan Fox, 282/-2, $126,313

T-16: Sanghyun Park, 282/-2, $126,313

T-16: Rory Sabbatini, 282/-2, $126,313

T-20: Stewart Cink, 283/-1, $91,350

T-20: Matthew Fitzpatrick, 283/-1, $91,350

T-20: Lucas Glover, 283/-1, $91,350

T-20: Louis Oosthuizen, 283/-1, $91,350

T-20: Doc Redman, 283/-1, $91,350

T-20: Justin Rose, 283/-1, $91,350

T-20: Cameron Smith, 283/-1, $91,350

T-20: Jordan Spieth, 283/-1, $91,350

T-20: Henrik Stenson, 283/-1, $91,350

T-20: Erik van Rooyen, 283/-1, $91,350

T-30: Kevin Kisner, 284/E, $69,875

T-30: Webb Simpson, 284/E, $69,875

T-32: Byeong Hun An, 285/1, $56,278

T-32: Kiradech Aphibarnrat, 285/1, $56,278

T-32: Ernie Els, 285/1, $56,278

T-32: Dylan Frittelli, 285/1, $56,278

T-32: Jason Kokrak, 285/1, $56,278

T-32: Joost Luiten, 285/1, $56,278

T-32: Andrew Putnam, 285/1, $56,278

T-32: Bernd Wiesberger, 285/1, $56,278

T-32: Andrew Wilson, 285/1, $56,278

T-41: Patrick Cantlay, 286/2, $36,925

T-41: Justin Harding, 286/2, $36,925

T-41: Benjamin Hebert, 286/2, $36,925

T-41: Innchoon Hwang, 286/2, $36,925

T-41: Russell Knox, 286/2, $36,925

T-41: Matt Kuchar, 286/2, $36,925

T-41: Xander Schauffele, 286/2, $36,925

T-41: Callum Shinkwin, 286/2, $36,925

T-41: Kyle Stanley, 286/2, $36,925

T-41: Aaron Wise, 286/2, $36,925

T-51: Branden Grace, 287/3, $28,317

T-51: Charley Hoffman, 287/3, $28,317

T-51: Dustin Johnson, 287/3, $28,317

T-51: Shubhankar Sharma, 287/3, $28,317

T-51: Matt Wallace, 287/3, $28,317

T-51: Bubba Watson, 287/3, $28,317

T-57: Paul Casey, 288/4, $26,467

T-57: Adam Hadwin, 288/4, $26,467

T-57: Graeme McDowell, 288/4, $26,467

T-57: Thorbjørn Olesen, 288/4, $26,467

T-57: Kevin Streelman, 288/4, $26,467

T-57: Ashton Turner, 288/4, $26,467

T-63: Jim Furyk, 289/5, $25,800

T-63: Mikko Korhonen, 289/5, $25,800

T-63: Romain Langasque, 289/5, $25,800

T-63: Paul Waring, 289/5, $25,800

T-67: Yosuke Asaji, 290/6, $25,088

T-67: Sergio Garcia, 290/6, $25,088

T-67: J.B. Holmes, 290/6, $25,088

T-67: Thomas Pieters, 290/6, $25,088

71: Eddie Pepperell, 292/8, $24,625

T-72: Nino Bertasio, 293/9, $24,438

T-72: Yuki Inamori, 293/9, $24,438

 

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