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Vega Looks to Capitalize on Golf’s Ultra-Premium Push



You know when an upscale steakhouse opens in your town, and no one wants to go because it’s too expensive? But then a ritzy Italian restaurant opens next door, and a high-end seafood restaurant opens next to that. Now the area is booming, and the original steakhouse’s prices don’t seem so outrageous anymore. Vega is that steakhouse in the ultra-premium golf equipment world, and it has its sights set on an uptick in reservations thanks to competitors with even higher-priced menus.

Vega got its start as the in-house brand for famed Japanese forging house, Kyoei, which has been manufacturing golf clubs for more than five decades. It was purchased by Professional Golf Europe (PGE) in 2012 with an agreement that PGE continue use the Kyoei factory to manufacture Vega’s one-piece irons. Its reputation is similar to Miura, a fellow Japanese golf equipment manufacturer. While Miura is significantly more popular than Vega in the U.S., it’s similarly perceived among its fans for its quality and attention to detail: particularly its one-piece irons.

“Up until this point, [Vega has] always been perceived as really expensive in the market.” “Now, all of the sudden, we’re half the price of some of the new brands.”

As in the restaurant example above, economics of the golf equipment industry have rapidly shifted in the last two years. Newcomer PXG stunned the industry with irons priced at more than $300 per club, two-to-three times the going rate. Even more stunning was the popularity of the clubs with golfers; PXG became dominant in the ultra-premium space. The industry took notice, and that’s what led things to where they are now. Titleist and Callaway have both made a push into the ultra-premium space with similarly priced products, while historically ultra-premium brand Miura is undergoing a rebrand and retooling its product line to enhance its appeal.


Vega’s new Alcor wedges sell for $260 per club in the U.S.

Despite the increased competition, the shift in the marketplace can be seen as an opportunity for Vega; not at the high end of the ultra-premium market that it once occupied, but in a new “affordable luxury” category that seems to be emerging. “Up until this point, [Vega has] always been perceived as really expensive in the market,” says Peter Lord, Director of Professional Golf Europe, the parent company that owns Vega. “Now, all of the sudden, we’re half the price of some of the new brands.”

Lord’s reference was to PXG, whose new 0311XF irons start at $350 per club, or $2800 for an eight-piece set. Golfers who want them in the company’s special dark finish will pay an extra $150 per club, raising the price to $4000 per set. Vega’s irons sell for around $2000 per set, depending on the model (Vega also sells a full line of metal woods, wedges and putters that the company plans to promote more aggressively going forward).

There are other reasons for Vega’s resurgence, particularly in North America. The first has to do with distribution. In 2016, Jennifer Gard of Eagle Golf Distributors purchased the rights to distribute Vega in North America. Gard, whose company also distributes Veylix shafts, felt that Vega was being undervalued by North American golfers due to a lack of retail presence and chatter. She didn’t see it as a product problem, although she and Lord recognized that there was an opportunity for Vega to add a new page to its menu, so to speak.

“All we’re doing is moving the balance point from old school, hand crafted to more of the tech side.”

Vega’s new Mizar irons and Alcor wedges are the first of the company’s new Star Line, which focuses on improved performance through multi-material constructions. It’s a completely new focus for the company, at least in irons, which had been focused almost entirely on one-piece forged designs.

The Mizar irons ($280 per club) are made from two main pieces: a forged club head that’s merged with a thinner, maraging forged club face. A tungsten weight is also used in the design of each iron to optimize the center of gravity of each club. It’s located inside the sole, and its location varies based on the club. Long irons have the tungsten weight in the heel, mid-irons have the weight in the middle of the club and short irons have the weight on the toe. “With Mizar and all future Star Line (clubs), all we’re doing is moving the balance point from old school, hand crafted to more of the tech side,” Lord says.

Vega will continue to offer what it’s calling its “Classic” VC line of one-piece irons, which are offered in a range of sizes to please traditionalists of all skills levels. They’ll maintain their traditional lofts, which is an area of sensitivity for many golfers.


The Mizar irons take a much more modern approach to distance. The stock pitching wedge loft is 42 degrees, which is 1-degree stronger than the 9-iron loft of Vega’s VM-01 and VM-02 muscleback irons. It’s not a total distance-first approach, however. Whereas many golf equipment manufacturers have focused on making the club faces as thin as possible in their distance-iron models to improve performance, Vega decided to make its Mizar iron faces thicker. They’re 3.5 millimeters in thickness, according to Lord, a design that maintains soft feel Vega is known for across the club face. “It’s less hot, but it still gives it forgiveness on off-center hits,” Lord says.

The Alcor wedges ($260 per club) are a one-piece forged design, but like the Mizar irons they have channels cut into their forged bodies that helped designers alter center of gravity for better performance. With the wedges, the aim was to push the weight higher and toward the center of the club to improve spin and feel.

Lord called Alcor “the first of a long-term strategy with wedges.” He also hinted that Vega will expand the Mizar iron lineup with a both larger and smaller model, although he says golfers shouldn’t expect to see them in stores for at least 18 months.

Discussion: See what GolfWRX Members are saying about the Mizar irons and Alcor wedges in our forum. 

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Zak is the Editor-in-Chief of He's been a part of the company since 2011, when he was hired to lead GolfWRX's Editorial Department. Zak developed GolfWRX's Featured Writer Program, which supports aspiring writers and golf industry professionals. He played college golf at the University of Richmond (Go Spiders!) and still likes to compete in tournaments. You can follow Zak on Twitter @ZakKoz, where he's happy to discuss his game and all the cool stuff that's part of his job.



  1. Francisco

    Jul 1, 2017 at 12:39 am

    Without doubt, one of the most versatile irons i have ever played. I play 6 hp and my last irons were Bridgestone j15 mb

  2. jc

    Jun 19, 2017 at 5:05 pm

    how long before they are in the used club rack at roger dunn? in the mean time, I will keep hitting my pings rather than sell my house for a set of irons.

  3. Bert

    Jun 17, 2017 at 12:05 pm

    Are these as ugly as the PXG irons? Maybe no, they look better to me. I’m not saying I like the look, but better than some club-head with a bunch of set screws.

    Who cares if the club-head housing is forged, the face is all that strikes the ball and the face is forged. Ok I guess I’m confused. If the club-head is solid, then forging is great, but if hollow, who cares. I can’t see where being a forged head matters for these designs. Just more marketing gimmicks to lead you to believe these over the top priced irons are great.

  4. Tom54

    Jun 16, 2017 at 1:57 pm

    The way I look at it go ahead and bring another premium club to the market. Will just be another one that I could care less about. That is one ugly club.

    • Gorden

      Jun 16, 2017 at 8:07 pm


  5. Duk Koo Kim

    Jun 16, 2017 at 4:54 am

    They look like golf’s version of the Edsel! Horrendous!

  6. H

    Jun 16, 2017 at 3:13 am

    They used to be cool, but not any more

  7. RG

    Jun 16, 2017 at 2:24 am

    Those irons make the Adams XTDs look good! Absolutely hideous clubs! If I see you playing those I am going to point and laugh out loud!

  8. chinchbugs

    Jun 15, 2017 at 5:13 pm

    I can’t shank them till I have tested them….oh wait! Yes I can! Shank.

  9. jgpl001

    Jun 15, 2017 at 4:21 pm

    Unbelievably UGLY

    I don’t care how exclusive they are I wouldn’t pay one dollar for them

  10. O

    Jun 15, 2017 at 12:57 pm

    Besotted gearheads must feel so inadequate, impotent, deflated, ashamed of their standard clubs which are being obsoleted semi-annually… and now the best technology is going into the ultra premium clubs. How can they live with themselves and their low class crap clubs?!!

  11. Brandon

    Jun 15, 2017 at 12:38 pm

    TaylorMade has already ruined the golf industry.

  12. Dat

    Jun 15, 2017 at 9:01 am

    Hideously bad. This ultra expensive push in the industry is exactly what will make the industry fail.

    • Cory

      Jun 15, 2017 at 10:11 am

      You don’t understand economics or how supply and demand work do you?

    • ROY

      Jun 15, 2017 at 11:16 am

      WHy will it make the industry fail – that like saying that Ferrari will make the auto industry fail. As long as the ultra priced items supplement the market and do not replace other areas of the market (which is what they are doing) then you should be fine.

      • Adam Crawford

        Jun 15, 2017 at 3:03 pm

        Exactly. These brands we’re hearing about that are the “Ultra-Premium” have been around for decades, quietly occupying a small niche market. Zak’s analogy is perfect. Casual golfers didn’t know they existed because the major marketing push has always grouping a few club makers into a category ($1k-1,500 for irons). But the fascinating thing about PXG is that they opened the flood gates and made people realize this market existed. These companies won’t have anything to do with the success or failure of the industry. They operate independently and don’t have to stock the shelves of 500 retailers so they don’t have capital tied up in inventory (which is where a lot of companies struggle with the bottom line), which means they basically produce them on demand.

  13. doesnotno

    Jun 15, 2017 at 8:48 am

    Mizar irons, $280 each. Sweet.

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pga tour

Marc Leishman WITB 2018



Equipment is accurate as of the 2018 Arnold Palmer Invitational (3/13/2018).

Driver: Callaway Rogue (9 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Speeder 757 Evolution IV X-Flex

Fairway Woods: Callaway Rogue (15, 21 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Motore Speeder VC Tour Spec 9.2X

Driving Iron: Callaway X Forged UT (18, 21 degrees)
Shafts: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 Tour 130X

Irons: Callaway X Forged (4-PW)
Shafts: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 Tour 130X

Wedges: Callaway Mack Daddy Forged (54-10S), Titleist Vokey SM7 (58-04L)
Shafts: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 Tour 130X

Putter: Odyssey Versa 1W (BWB)
Grip: Odyssey Pistol

Golf Ball: Callaway Chrome Soft X


Discussion: See what GolfWRX members are saying about Leishman’s clubs.

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pga tour

Kiradech Aphibarnrat WITB 2018



Equipment is accurate as of the 2018 Arnold Palmer Invitational (3/13/2018).

Driver: Callaway GBB Epic Sub Zero (9 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Kuro Kage XD 60TX

Driver: Callaway Rogue Sub Zero (10.5 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Kuro Kage XD 60TX

3 Wood: Callaway Rogue (15 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Kuro Kage 70TX

Driving Iron: Callaway Epic Pro (3)
Shaft: UST Mamiya Elements Fire 100X

Irons: Callaway X Forged (3-5), Callaway Apex MB (6-PW)
Shaft: Project X Rifle 6.0

Wedges: Callaway Mack Daddy Forged (52-10R) Callaway Mack Daddy 4 (58-08C)
Shaft: True Temper Project X 6.0

Putter: Odyssey Versa #7 CS
Grip: Iomic Pistol

Putter: Odyssey EXO Seven
Grip: Odyssey Pistol

WITB Notes: Aphibarnrat was spotted testing drivers ahead of the Arnold Palmer Invitational. We’ll update this post when we confirm his decision.


Discussion: See what GolfWRX members are saying about Aphibarnrat’s clubs. 

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Ernie Els WITB 2018



Equipment is accurate as of the 2018 Arnold Palmer Invitational (3/13/2018).

Driver: XXIO X (9.5 degrees)
Shaft: Project X Even Flow 6.5X 65

3 Wood: XXIO X Fairway (15 degrees)
Shaft: Project X Even Flow 6.5

Irons: Srixon Z U65 (18, 20, 23 degrees)
Shaft: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3

Irons: Srixon Z745 (3-PW)
Shaft: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 Tour 125X

Wedges: Cleveland RTX-3 V-MG (52-10, 56-11, 60-06LG)
Shaft: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 WV125S Tour Only

Putter: Bloodline R1-J Els Gen 1
Grip: Bloodline

Golf Ball: Srixon Z-Star XV


Discussion: See what GolfWRX members are saying about Els’ clubs. 

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19th Hole