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Callaway’s new high-end Epic, Epic Pro irons and hybrids

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How does Callaway follow up the most popular new drivers on the market? It introduces a set of players irons built like game-improvement irons with never-before-seen technology, of course.

With its new Epic and Epic Pro irons, Callaway is introducing a new weighting system that starts with tungsten-powder pellets to dial in the performance and feel of each iron. It’s also bringing more distance and forgiveness into Pro-style irons (re: smaller frames, toplines and sole widths), helping the Epic Pro irons create more ball speed than the company’s popular Apex CF ’16 irons.

It’s no accident that irons called “Epic” are introducing new technology to the world of golf clubs. With its GBB Epic and GBB Epic Sub Zero drivers, Callaway gave the golfing world “Jailbreak,” or two titanium rods that connected the crown and the sole to produce more ball speed and overall distance.

Discussion: See what GolfWRX members are saying about Callaway’s Epic irons

Discussion: See Callaway’s Epic iron in hand photos and comparison pics with other irons

EXOCage

Like Callaway’s Big Bertha irons, the Epic and Epic Pro irons use Callaway’s Exo-Cage design.

For the irons also bearing the Epic name, Hocknell and a team of 70 or more engineers had no boundaries or budget to create game-changing irons. Hocknell’s goal was to create a Pro iron with distance-enhancing technologies. As such, “Doc’s Irons,” as the Pro irons were referred to internally at Callaway, were given Face Cups and an “Exo Cage” steel structure (pictured above) to support the Face Cups. While Callaway has used Face Cups to increase ball speeds in its metal woods and game-improvement irons, it has never before added the technology to a set of players irons like the Epic Pro.

Epic Pro Irons Gallery

The Epic Pro irons also employ a tungsten-steel weighting system that yields greater control over where center of gravity is placed inside each iron. The weights start as tungsten and steel powders, which are then cooked for 51 hours at 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit before they’re injection molded into the center of the irons. The long irons use the intricately-shaped weights that are positioned low and toe-ward in the heads to influence a higher ball flight, while the shorter irons have the weights placed higher in the heads to encourage more spin, control and workability. This means each individual iron has a specialized center of gravity that plays to the needs of that iron.

TungstenWeighting

This weighting system also allows Callaway to control the weight of the heads. The company can make the club heads up to 5 grams heavier or lighter depending on a golfer’s needs, which gives consumers the same head-weight options as Callaway’s Tour players, the company says.

HoselThe two-piece structured irons also have a hosel that weighs nearly 30 grams less than the Apex 2016 irons. Eliminating weight from the hosel allowed Callaway to use that weight more efficiently, and helped to build up a stronger Exo Cage backbone.

The result of the new design is 0.5 mph of added ball speed compared to the Callaway Apex irons, according to Callaway, which are widely considered one of the longest-flying game-improvement irons available. As a reminder, the Epic Pro irons are more of a players irons, making those ball speeds quite impressive.

Epic Irons Gallery

Although the original intent of Hocknell’s design was for a Pro-style iron, he asked himself “What would happen if you enlarged the size?” Thus, the Epic game-improvement irons were birthed. The Epic irons have the same Exo Cage and tungsten-infused weight system that the Epic Pro irons utilize, except they have more offset, wide soles, larger club faces and slightly stronger lofts. Golfers can expect these irons to be a half-club longer than Callaway’s Apex irons, according to Callaway. They will suit the fancy of golfers who need a bit more forgiveness and distance than the Epic Pro offering.

The Epic and Epic Pro irons will sell for $250 apiece with steel shafts and $280 each with graphite shafts. If those price tags shock you — and we don’t blame you if they do — welcome to the current state of the market where high-end irons are more common than ever.

Epic Hybrid Gallery

To round out the line of Epic clubs, Callaway is also introducing Epic hybrids that use the same technologies as Epic fairway woods. That’s to say they have lightweight, carbon crowns and the company’s Face Cup technology to produce distance and forgiveness. They’re available for $279.99 each in 2, 3, 4 and 5 hybrid options.

Epic, Epic Pro and Epic hybrids will be available in stores and through Callaway’s website June 16.

Discussion: See what GolfWRX members are saying about Callaway’s Epic irons

Discussion: See Callaway’s Epic iron in hand photos and comparison pics with other irons

 

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He played on the Hawaii Pacific University Men's Golf team and earned a Masters degree in Communications. He also played college golf at Rutgers University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.

65 Comments

65 Comments

  1. John Krug

    Aug 30, 2017 at 10:25 am

    Why does the 2 hybrid have a loft of 18 degrees instead of 16 degrees?

  2. Mikee

    Jun 9, 2017 at 9:37 am

    I hit the new Epic CF17 last night. I was impressed. They don’t look great but………numbers don’t lie!

  3. TeeBone

    Jun 8, 2017 at 2:58 am

    Congratulations…your first post that made sense!

  4. TeeBone

    Jun 8, 2017 at 2:56 am

    “No boundaries or budget”? Ahh, the “PXG Effect”. $250 – 280 per iron? Ahh, the “PXG effect”. If the herd didn’t still think they can buy a game, these ridiculous prices wouldn’t fly.

  5. cray

    May 25, 2017 at 10:37 am

    Guys like you are boring. Hate to hate. First tee baby. My 250 3 iron down the center with high flight will be nice as you bang your 200 straight down the center.

  6. Lob Wedge

    May 25, 2017 at 3:53 am

    Dear Callaway,

    Congrats on picking up the Taylormade Marketing department.

  7. KK

    May 24, 2017 at 10:06 pm

    So all of these golf pioneers were just lying crooks cheating uninformed golfers: Ping with their Eye2 irons, Callaway with their Big Bertha drivers, TaylorMade with their R drivers, Vokey with his wedges. Right. I see your brilliance. I really do.

  8. Dave R

    May 24, 2017 at 5:32 pm

    Tom you are right on well said. Hope some one in the golf market understands and starts to listen. Seems the billionaire is the one calling the shots with his screws in the clubs, the other companies just jumping on board . What’s the limit the market will bear? Only time will tell. I’ll continue to hack with my cheap 5 year discounted mizuno. They still work sometimes.

  9. Tom54

    May 24, 2017 at 3:45 pm

    $250 a club? What are they thinking when they plop this price on ? A nice set of irons might be worth $1200-1400 Even at that price it’s up there. Good irons last several years with proper care and grip changes. Only problem nowadays is if you’ve got a nice set for couple of years it is now 3-4 models old and no longer relevant. Let’s face it all clubs are maxed out technology wise so all they are doing is a cosmetic change here and there but you’ve just got to have it. Best way to go is wait 6 months and get today’s hot item for a fraction of the cost. I believe they have not found the holy grail club if it has to be changed twice a year.

  10. dcorun

    May 24, 2017 at 1:36 pm

    I’m not a hater of any golf company but, I just don’t understand what’s going on. They say the game is going in the tank and then can’t understand why. People may think the economy is getting better but, $2000 for a set of irons better? As a previous member posted, practice and getting some lessons will help more than any club you buy. They have a driverless car but, haven’t invented the golf club that swings for you. What they need is another category for clubs.

    Players Clubs
    Game Improvement Clubs
    Super Game Improvement Clubs
    I HAVE MONEY TO BURN CLUBs.

  11. King of Carlsbad

    May 24, 2017 at 1:01 pm

    Seem fantastic. Same haters had Callaway going out of business years ago.

    • Me

      May 24, 2017 at 3:21 pm

      It wasn’t haters, Callaway was practically a penny stock a few years ago. Poor distribution, 100s laid off, way over inventoried, low demand, marketing was awful, and retail prices were falling. Speculation was Nike was ready to pounce and probably should have. Nothing to do with hatred, just a grim reality of business.

  12. Dave R

    May 24, 2017 at 12:28 pm

    Really $250.00 a club COM ON BOYS ? ONLY THE RICH PLAY GOLF IN THE FURTURE!!!!!!!! . Thought we were trying to promote the game not get rid of it.

  13. Joro

    May 24, 2017 at 10:36 am

    They are for people with way more money than a game. They are just continuing on their quest to buy a better game. Find a good teacher instead. You will not see very many real players with these, at least after a month. Part of their contract may require playing them for a while, but then back to the Gamers. Just another marketing scam for a production Club.

  14. MySlice

    May 24, 2017 at 7:26 am

    I guess in keeping with tradition, they HAD to release them but they are definitely ugly. Someone will like them im sure.

  15. Matt

    May 24, 2017 at 3:14 am

    Wow, those irons are really fugly. 70 engineers but obviously none with a good eye.

  16. Judge mental

    May 24, 2017 at 3:06 am

    Golf clubs for rich kids

  17. Mat

    May 24, 2017 at 1:44 am

    Even
    Phil
    Is
    Cringing

  18. Mat

    May 24, 2017 at 1:43 am

    Embodied
    PXG
    In
    China

  19. Mat

    May 24, 2017 at 1:41 am

    Engineering
    Poor;
    Insane
    Cost

  20. tlmcik

    May 23, 2017 at 9:05 pm

    Rube Goldberg would be proud.

  21. TWShoot67

    May 23, 2017 at 7:58 pm

    I just find it hilarious that they are trying to sell us on SEVENTY I mean over SEVENTY engineers have worked on this aeronautical design. to get 0.5 mph increased ball speeds. And will that mean that crazy ECO Cage frame be Casted or forged? CNC’d? All this cost must be paying for those over 70 engineers. lol. I guess you really can’t blame them because if you listen to PXG they are killing it with a one of a kind tech, that’s why I see at least 1-2 sets being sold every week in the BST ( because the owners are so happy with this product). I see the same thing happening here with this Callaway product. They’re betting on those individuals that have that big bank account who still thinks its better to spend thousands of dollars on high end clubs then to buy lessons. As hard work and dedication is just that hard. It’s easier to try a hopefully buy a game. Have fun boys. all of this wonderful tech and still amateur golfers scores are no better then when they went out and picked up 200.00 sets of irons. Now they pay 2,000.00 a set and still can’t break a 100. I think maybe Callaway has too many engineers at one company to design a set of clubs.

  22. Mark

    May 23, 2017 at 7:58 pm

    Are those the new RBZ irons?

  23. MrPoopoo

    May 23, 2017 at 7:49 pm

    hmm… Epic Ugly from a decal/graphics side, but at least they look pretty good from address… which is more important anyway.

    Better players don’t care about ball speed on irons. Distance control, consistency and workability are more important. Trajectory is important, but that can be adjusted with shaft fittings.

  24. Eric B

    May 23, 2017 at 7:46 pm

    Lol cast clubs at Japanese forged prices. FoH Callaway.

  25. Duk Koo Kim

    May 23, 2017 at 7:13 pm

    He said “Nickent!” Great call!!

  26. Sam

    May 23, 2017 at 6:58 pm

    These irons are just compact hybrids. With Callaway’s reputation for quality, you’re going to get some real heaters that fly 20 yards past the green

  27. John

    May 23, 2017 at 5:13 pm

    Yes, golfers are looking for GI irons that look like players irons. Like Ping I200. Now those are some nice looking irons.

  28. AceW7Iron

    May 23, 2017 at 4:05 pm

    Yep..Im die-hard in the prime of my buying life but these are outside the boundary. I did reach for the Epic driver used off the Bay but $280 for just 1 iron? Off the hizzy…
    Im out… Enjoy them Gates & Company

  29. brian

    May 23, 2017 at 3:57 pm

    haha, I wouldn’t bag those ugly sticks for $800 a set, let alone $2k. Good luck with that, Callaway.

  30. Joey5Picks

    May 23, 2017 at 3:28 pm

    Their target market: people with more money than sense.

  31. Bob Jacobs

    May 23, 2017 at 3:14 pm

    I guess their figuring that PXG irons go for a ton of money, so what they heck, let’s go for it!! Silly

    I just dont get why these manufacturers dont go for a cleaner look all around. Also who came up with this incredibly gross green color theme?? I own an Epic and love it, but certainly not from an aesthetics standpoint.

    C’mon guys, give us less marketing, labels and phony tech looking stuff on the outside of the club!!

  32. Minnesota golfer

    May 23, 2017 at 2:06 pm

    It’s ridiculous the lofts of the Epic Irons are even stronger (lower number) than Apex cf16 irons. Definitely game improvement irons. PASS.

  33. alexdub

    May 23, 2017 at 12:42 pm

    Lolz. $2k for face cups. I bet these are no different than the XR Pros. Callaway is doing is their own litmus market test for a higher price point — something akin to what Titleist did with the C16 line.

    • LH

      May 23, 2017 at 8:31 pm

      You mean no different to the original Fusions.

  34. Steve

    May 23, 2017 at 11:11 am

    Titleist sold their full stock of C16 irons so Callaway jumps on the bandwagon.

    In 2 years the “standard” set of irons will cost $1500.

  35. Prut

    May 23, 2017 at 11:00 am

    They have Nickent look to them.

  36. Dat

    May 23, 2017 at 10:25 am

    “If those price tags shock you — and we don’t blame you if they do — welcome to the current state of the market where high-end irons are more common than ever.”

    The prices don’t shock me at all. Especially from a cheesy marketing company like Callaway Golf – which is exactly that. Their clubs, aside from the Rory MB protos, are purely built on technology that is over a decade old in new skin and fancy graphics. The market will only bear this for so long; so take advantage while you can, Callaway. Ride is about to end. Golf is in for a rude awakening when these clubs fizzle at retail. Everyone saying, “I told you so” is going to be correct here. Most players want a set of irons at $1000 or less, not $2000 or more.

    • Vanessa Carlysle

      May 23, 2017 at 2:59 pm

      +1000

      The last two announcements on WRX from Callaway/Odyssey have been embarrassing.
      1. The red putters – copied exact color from TM – Pathetic
      2. High Price, Ugly look Irons – copied idea from PXG – Pathetic

      Would like to see more imagination, innovation and origination from this company, but not going to hold my breath

    • setter02

      May 23, 2017 at 4:46 pm

      Just makes them seem like a bargain when they are 50% off in 6-8 months and they are still making money off of them. Retailers not to much, but the OEM’s don’t care about them as the ‘cost’ pricing keeps going up and up and up for no real reason.

    • Feel the Bern

      May 23, 2017 at 7:47 pm

      I agree with you, but I would add that the Rory MB’s are built on technology over 4 decades old!

      • Me

        May 24, 2017 at 3:30 pm

        Rory no longer plays with Callaway blades….he now plays Taylormade. Just sayin

  37. C

    May 23, 2017 at 10:05 am

    That’s a lot of offset.

  38. SoCalSlicer

    May 23, 2017 at 10:02 am

    How many levels of approval do these go through, before they are given a green light? Those have to be some of the worst, and I mean the most hideous irons I’ve ever seen. Ever. Good god.

  39. BB

    May 23, 2017 at 9:52 am

    $250 an iron? Overpriced junk.

  40. Leon

    May 23, 2017 at 9:22 am

    Callaway will be the next Taylormade, that’s it.

  41. Golferguy

    May 23, 2017 at 9:21 am

    I would’ve loved to see these clubs dressed up in plain steel, a la Srixon, Mizuno, etc. Going forward, I’m considering a set of Miura clubs if I choose to go high-end, though my Mizuno sticks are working for me really well.

  42. Tyson Rochambeau

    May 23, 2017 at 9:17 am

    High end? They look like a set from Wal-Mart.

  43. J C

    May 23, 2017 at 9:14 am

    Those of you who are saying these are ugly you need to seem them in person. The pro’s look great. I would like to know what shafts are available for the hybrids.

  44. DJ

    May 23, 2017 at 8:32 am

    My goodness those are hideous. Callaway making it very hard to become a fan

  45. Teaj

    May 23, 2017 at 8:24 am

    A players iron that looks like a GI iron, I’m not sure the market for players irons wants a busy looking club head, I have been wrong before though. I am sure people will bring up the fact that you do not see the back of the club when at address but there is something to be said about looking at your bag from a far and seeing a nice clean looking set of clubs (my opinion)

    • Steve

      May 23, 2017 at 11:15 am

      The funny thing is I think the market wants the EXACT opposite – GI irons that look like players irons.

  46. Greg V

    May 23, 2017 at 8:24 am

    They look cheap.

  47. LH

    May 23, 2017 at 8:22 am

    Gorgeous. Count me in for Epic Pro

  48. Nath

    May 23, 2017 at 7:51 am

    I really like the shape of the hybrid

  49. Corey

    May 23, 2017 at 7:49 am

    I like Cally, but not gonna sell a whole lot at that price. If your gonna be expensive, you better be pretty.

  50. Desmond

    May 23, 2017 at 7:35 am

    Assume the pics at address and that overly thick topline (reminiscent of the Big Bertha OS) are of the normal Epic, not the Epic Pro.

  51. Duk Koo Kim

    May 23, 2017 at 7:35 am

    +2……..and at 2 grand a set? As the kids used to say, REALLY? Callaway needs to get tossed away!

    And what may I ask is “high end?” What a riot!

  52. Powder skier

    May 23, 2017 at 6:46 am

    Hope they work better then they look uugh

  53. Mr Muira

    May 23, 2017 at 6:32 am

    Fugly.

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Equipment

WRX Spotlight Review: TaylorMade M5 fairway Rocket 3

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Product: TaylorMade M5 fairway Rocket 3

Pitch: The TaylorMade M5 fairway Rocket 3 is a stronger-lofted version of the standard TaylorMade M5 3-wood. The Rocket is 14 degrees. The standard M5 is 15.

Our take on the TaylorMade M5 Rocket 3

“WOW, you really hit that 3-wood like a rocket!”

” Not like a rocket… an actual Rocket!”

The beloved 3-wood. A favorite club of both average golfers and pros alike, a club that many will hold onto well after what some might consider their “best before” date. But with new options and improved technology, these old faithfuls are getting the boot quicker for a lot of reasons including the ability to better dial in a fit and help minimizing misses.

Since making a club faster off the middle is becoming more and more difficult thanks to the limits set forth but the USGA, OEMs are changing the way we think about clubs and putting a greater focus on decreasing dispersion and optimizing misses. TaylorMade is doing this with TwistFace, which was originally introduced in drivers a generation ago, and has now been included in the M5 and M6 fairway woods.

I got to spend some time with the knowledgeable crew at TaylorMade Canada in their new indoor facility just north of Toronto (lets call it Kingdom North) In that time, we went through a driver fitting, and then to the new M5 fairway woods to try and replace one of my oldest faithfuls: a 14-degree SLDR Tour Spoon. To say I have a unique ability to elevate a fairway wood is something that even my fitter was a little surprised by. My numbers with my cranked down to 12 degree (measured) fairway off the deck were good but could be improved. I can hit it both ways (as much as a 6-handicap can actually claim that) but my trusted go-to shot is a slight fade with some heel bias contact because of my swing. I am willing to sacrifice some distance but usually hit it where I want.

What I saw at the end of the fitting was a club that produced longer shots along with a tighter dispersion without having to make or to try and make any changes to my swing. The final fit was a 14-degree “Rocket” M5 fairway set to 12 degrees. It beat out my SLDR by a total of nine yards, which is an increase of just over a total of three percent, including an additional six yards of carry.

To say I was honestly surprised would be an understatement. The SLDR TS is a club that the first time I hit it I went WHOA! Low spin, workable, looks exactly how I want that club to look (small and compact). You can see from the numbers below when it works it works.

Why does TwistFace work?

Let’s explain and get a little deep in the technology weeds for a second. Bulge and roll is not a new concept. In fact, it would be a lie to claim that all OEMs haven’t done something similar to this is the past or played with these two variables to help golfers hit better shots. Fact: Every OEM optimizes the bulge and roll on their clubs to increase speed and maximize performance. Tom Wishon actually had a line of woods at one point that went the other way had VERY limited roll from the top tine to the sole. With this design, more loft on the bottom of the head helped players who miss low or need help elevating the ball off the deck increase launch and spin. It worked. Cobra also has what it calls E9 technology to tweak bulge and roll to help maximize the speed and forgiveness of their woods. It also works.

What makes TaylorMade’s TwistFace different is that it is the most aggressive iteration of this bulge and roll tweaking yet, and by introducing it into the fairway woods and hybrids, it’s proving to be a winner — even for this now-proven wrong skeptic.

At the end of the day, the M5 Ti “Rocket” was a measurable improvement over my previous 3-wood. Now it would be disingenuous to say “if you aren’t using TwistFace in your fairway woods you’re not maximized,” but if you are someone that struggles with fairway wood dispersion and looking to find some extra distance for taking on par-5s, taking a look at the new M5 and M6 fairway woods as part of your next fitting should be very high on your list.

 

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Forum Thread of the Day: “Low handicapper switching to game improvement irons”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from jasonTel3 – a low handicap player who plays blades but who has had his head turned by game improvement irons. According to jasonTel3, every ball was hit straight when testing out a set of Ping G400’s at a simulator, and he’s been asking fellow members for advice on whether he should make the move to GI’s.

Here are a few posts from the thread discussing jasonTel3’s conundrum, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • balls_deep: “My first thought is to say don’t do it.. but then if you’ve hit them, liked them, and the numbers were right, it could be a good option. A friend I play with uses G400 and they have too much offset for my liking. I also don’t like that you can see the cavity on the 4 and 5 iron. Top line is actually very nice for a SGI iron. I just read the Ping Blueprint article on Golf Digest where they were talking about how some players hit small heads better. I definitely fall into that category. That said, I just ordered a set of i210 to try as I had really good luck with the i200 and should never have sold them. Have you tried the newer I series? IMO it’s GI help in a players look with an acceptable sole width. Long story short though – if you felt comfortable and the fit was right, why not try them? If you don’t work the ball a ton, I don’t see any issue with it. High and straight is a good way to go!”
  • hammergolf: “I’ve been playing Ping G25’s for 6 years. Still can’t find anything I like better. I can hit any shot I need to whether it’s my stock draw, fade, high, or low. And when I hit it a little thin, or on the toe, it still lands on the green. My thought is why play golf with a club that will punish you for mishit when you can play one that will help you.”
  • azone: “Everyone has an opinion, and here is mine. If you are/have been a good ball striker with a sound mental game, your mind will keep writing checks your body may not be able to cash as you get older or don’t practice enough. Those “ugly” forgiving irons look beautiful when a miss ends up on the green, and you are putting– not in rough or deep in a short side bunker. Those irons won’t be AS ACCURATE as, say, a blade, BUT if you aren’t as dependable as in the past, your results will be better. I used to keep two sets of blueprinted irons; blades for practice and CB for play. I play with guys that have cashed checks playing…and they don’t care how ugly the iron is.”
  • Jut: “As a decent player (and ball striker) and a sweeper/picker (I could hit off of a green and not take any landscape with me), I’ve found much success with the F9s (which, with the wide sole, are very similar to the G410 irons). In the past 4 years I’ve gone from Mizuno MP-68 to Callaway Apex CF16 to Ping i500 (a brief and bad experience) to the Cobra F9’s. For what it’s worth, the Cobras have been the best of the bunch by far.”

Entire Thread: “Low handicap going to game improvement irons”

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WRX Spotlight: Stitch headcovers

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Product: Stitch headcovers

Pitch: From Stitch: “Your game should match your style. At Stitch, we aim to merchandise our line of products so you can easily put together items that not only match your bag and what is it in it, but also match your style and personality. We want to make it easy for you to have a unique and color-coordinated golf bag. We have designed unique products that have defined color schemes so that choosing which items to put in your bag becomes easier. We aim to provide you with various looks, mixing and matching our head covers to give you confidence that the purchase you make for your bag will take you to the course in style. Let us help you dress your game.”

Our Take On Stitch Headcovers

Stitch is a relatively new company – founded in 2012. The company initially only created premium headcovers but has grown into so much more, with all sorts of golfing accessories now on offer on their site StitchGolf.com. Their bags, in particular, are now some of the most popular amongst golfers, with the quality and uniqueness provided leading multiple Tour players to sport them in tournament play.

That sign of quality in the bags bodes well for what the company was founded on – their headcovers. Stitch provides both leather and knit headcovers in a variety of designs that do as good a job as any in covering the needs of all golfers.

Stitch describes the companies Monte Carlo headcover as being their “classic, timeless design”, and for those looking for that vintage style to add to their set up then they can’t go wrong with this headcover. A mainstay in the likes of multiple tour winner Paul Casey’s bag, the Monte Carlo headcover, as with all of the companies leather covers, is hand-crafted from 100% leather and is both water and stain resistant. The cover comes in four color codes: Black, White, Navy and Red, and at $68 is the most affordable of all their leather headcovers.

Other options in the leather department range from their intricately designed Camo cover which comes in a multiple color design, as well as Stitch’s tribute to “The King”, through their Arnold Palmer headcover.

The AP cover comes in a minimalist black with white stripes for a classic feel, but it also comes in a white color code decorated with red, white and yellow stripes which, for myself at least, looks even more alluring. Part of an exclusive collection, the only issue with the AP cover is that only those located in the U.S. are currently eligible to get their hands on one. But for those in the states, the company is now offering a set of three AP leather covers for $128 instead of $298 should you use the code APLEATHERS on their site.

From their Tour Racer, USA, Shamrock and Bonesman editions, Stitch provides a great choice when it comes to their leather covers, and as previously mentioned, all are hand-crafted from 100% leather, water and stain resistant and will assure an excellent fit on your clubs.

Stitch also provides knit headcovers which contain not only excellent designs but also the same quality which has gone into their leather covers. All of the companies knit covers are made from Techno Wool, which is 100% acrylic and designed in order for your clubs to stay entirely dry. Another feature of the knit covers from Stitch is their smart fit design which ensures all of the covers retain their shape over a long period, as well as providing for a cover that will reliably stay on your club.

The knit covers from Stitch cost $68 ($72 for the limited AP cover), and there are currently seven different designs available to choose from over at StitchGolf.com. The leather covers are, unsurprisingly, a little pricier, but still very affordable, ranging from $68-$98. The covers deliver in both style and performance, and for a relatively new company, it speaks volumes that the likes of Jim Furyk, Paul Casey, Bryson DeChambeau and many more tour pros are now sporting the company’s creations.

 

 

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19th Hole

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