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Back By Popular Demand: Titleist C16 Irons



Last April, Titleist did something out of character. It released a line of golf clubs called C16 without the extensive testing and validation process that’s typical for the company’s products. Like concept cars in the auto industry, these were “concept clubs” created for the purpose of experimenting with new technologies, materials and manufacturing processes in an effort to push existing boundaries.

“We weren’t really sure how it would go and how the products would do,” said Josh Talge, Vice President of Marketing for Titleist.

Titleist did no marketing for the clubs, and as you might imagine, they were expensive: $1,000 for a driver and about $3,000 for a set of irons. They were also available in a very limited supply — about 1,500 drivers and 1,000 set of irons — and restricted to buyers willing to be fit for the clubs at Titleist-authorized locations. Despite those hurdles, the clubs sold quickly. And due to popular demand, Titleist is releasing an additional 1000 sets of the C16 irons.

“So many people who hit the C16 irons would say things like, ‘I’ve never done that before or I didn’t think I could do this.'” Talge says. “Golfers were getting a club more distance … all in a package that looks like a players club.”


As with the original launch, fittings are available at the company’s TPI Oceanside and Manchester Lane test facilities, as well as Titleist Fitting Days and Titleist Thursdays trial and fitting events. With the relaunch, Titleist has also added 50 select fitting partners around the country who can now fit C16 irons. The reason Titleist is requiring golfers to be fit for the C16 irons is two-fold, Talge says. The company wants to make sure C16 iron buyers are confident they’re getting something limited and special. Just as importantly, Titleist wants to continue to learn from the C16 irons.

Much has been learned already. When Titleist originally launched the C16 irons it did so with the option of a special “SureFit Grip,” an adjustable counter-weighting feature that gave fitters the option of positioning a 20-gram weight at the bottom or top of the grip to change the way a golfer’s hands rotated at impact for improved performance. It proved beneficial for some C16 buyers, but Talge called it “complex.” He pointed to Titleist’s inability to offer it as an option in more than one grip model and the complications of re-gripping clubs with SureFit grips as the reason it will not be included in the re-launch.

“You could only get [SureFit Grip technology] in a grip that was basically a Tour Velvet,” Talge says. “And when it came time to change your grips, it had to be done by Titleist … We’re still working out some of those kinks.”

nullTitleist’s C16 driver, on the other hand, proved to be a product with technologies that were immediately ready for mass production. It introduced a moveable-weight technology called SureFit CG that was added to the company’s 917D2 and 917D3 drivers, which were released in the fall of 2016.

Talge emphasized, as Titleist did with the announcement of its C16 clubs in April 2016, that there is no set launch schedule for its concept clubs. New concept clubs will only be released when the company feels it has created a ground-breaking design… or in this case, when golfers can’t get enough of a previous design.

Titleist’s C16 irons ($375-$415 per club) will be available April 15 in the U.S. and in select global markets for right- and left-handed golfers. All of Titleist’s custom shafts and grips are available at no additional cost with one exception: AeroTech’s Steelfiber (+$56 per shaft). Learn More about the C16 irons from Titleist. 

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Zak is the Editor-in-Chief of He's been a part of the company since 2011, when he was hired to lead GolfWRX's Editorial Department. Zak developed GolfWRX's Featured Writer Program, which supports aspiring writers and golf industry professionals. He played college golf at the University of Richmond (Go Spiders!) and still likes to compete in tournaments. You can follow Zak on Twitter @ZakKoz, where he's happy to discuss his game and all the cool stuff that's part of his job.



  1. TheRealDeal

    Apr 18, 2017 at 1:02 pm

    I’m bagging these sweet sticks!!! Breaking 90’s here I come.

  2. #1HoganFan

    Apr 16, 2017 at 11:44 am

    To quote a vender a the PGA merchandise show on Orlando a couple if years back. “There is nothing new in golf just new ways to sell it.”

  3. KK

    Apr 15, 2017 at 9:40 am

    I understand the T-MB because it’s small and very forgiving. This is big and chunky and marginally better than the $800 AP1.

  4. Dan

    Apr 15, 2017 at 12:11 am

    I’m beginning to think that the golf companies are pandering to the .1% or .10% of Americans that can afford clubs like PXG, Honma and these current clubs. The everyday working class golfer who gets out every other Saturday is getting lower on the totem pole. Even $500 drivers are getting to be too much. I guess class discrimination knows no bounds. As I’ve said before, I’m still playing my Cleveland 588 MT’s and shooting in the 80’s. 🙂

  5. Dave R

    Apr 14, 2017 at 10:22 pm

    Right on Brad T you can’t buy a golf game. Well think about that awhile.

  6. BigSean

    Apr 14, 2017 at 12:11 pm

    These are some sweet sticks, know why mean. My mom said she will buy me some when I move out of her basement. She’s just went to get me a 50 and a pack of cigs. Later fellas…..

  7. Smiller

    Apr 14, 2017 at 12:01 pm

    Now I can buy a backup set of clubs to use when my PXG’s are in the shop. My buddy Jim Grundy has these and they are friggin’ incredible! He hits them long and straight on every shot. From an engineering standpoint they are second to none, and none left town!

  8. Tyler

    Apr 14, 2017 at 11:57 am

    I’ve hit the C16 Driver. It’s ugly and doesn’t compare to Titleist’s regular line of woods.

  9. Obumma

    Apr 14, 2017 at 11:53 am

    I can do things with these irons I have never been able to do:
    1. Hit the ball
    2. Get some height
    3. Look the part
    4. Be really cool
    5. Hang with Scotty

  10. Thomas Murphy

    Apr 14, 2017 at 11:41 am

    Next gen T-MB for PXG price that is fashion forward for people with cash and strong brand affinity.

  11. Mark

    Apr 14, 2017 at 6:41 am

    Silly money for clubs.

  12. JS

    Apr 14, 2017 at 2:57 am

    Does anyone know why PGA pros don’t play these? Spieth is staffed by titleist…. why aren’t any of their staffers playing these?

  13. a

    Apr 14, 2017 at 12:17 am

    Lower lofts on irons are necessary with the new club technology. Titleist sold the initial run of irons……… obviously they had the need to produce more.

    Golf is a sport but also an industry….

  14. Chuck

    Apr 13, 2017 at 10:35 pm

    I know I’d like to try them. Are they hollow, like T-MB’s? I’m guessing not, since there’s no hole in the toe which I think is sort of required in the manufacturing process.

    So; is there a single tour player, on a single tour (U.S., Euro, AustralAsian, etc.) who has a single one of these clubs in play?

    I remember when some of the Japan-only stuff notably made it into tour bags. Ernie Els’ cherished 690.CH 3-iron comes to mind. If these were so magic, you’d think that there’d be some of that.

    • Eric

      Apr 14, 2017 at 1:53 pm

      Nope they’re hollow.

      • Chuck

        Apr 14, 2017 at 7:12 pm

        Thanks Eric I appreciate that info. With the T-MB already in their line, it really makes for a curious offering.

  15. Mat

    Apr 13, 2017 at 8:33 pm

    C16 Mar-o-lago edition.

  16. Mike

    Apr 13, 2017 at 7:48 pm

    With the weight moved low in the head they launch high, therefore the need to strengthen the lofts. These are some awesome irons, forgiving yet workable. I have them with the KBS Tour X. I have a Trackman and an E6 simulator and everyone that’s hit them likes them. They are in a league of their own.

  17. Mr Muira

    Apr 13, 2017 at 6:22 pm


  18. matt_bear

    Apr 13, 2017 at 2:00 pm

    it plays a club longer because they basically labeled the clubs wrong. Comparing the lofts of the C16 to a set of CB’s it’s literally a club difference. lol

  19. Fat Perez

    Apr 13, 2017 at 12:22 pm

    Well, at least we won’t hear from the whining “lefties” about being left out! Step right up and get gouged ya bunch ‘o wrong siders! PXTitleist to the rescue!!!!

  20. Double Mocha Man 4 President

    Apr 13, 2017 at 11:56 am

    You are da man

  21. Tyler

    Apr 13, 2017 at 11:07 am

    These clubs are most no better than any other club in it’s category. If you have the swing you can pretty much play whatever you want and there is no need to pay 3k for a set of irons.

  22. Hoselshot82

    Apr 13, 2017 at 11:02 am

    I’ve had a mint condition set on the classifieds that I can’t even sell for 1750.00

  23. 3PuttTerritory

    Apr 13, 2017 at 10:03 am

    The shaft upcharge @ full retail+installation in a $3000 set of irons is my favorite, most Titleist thing ever.

  24. Bogeypro

    Apr 13, 2017 at 9:55 am

    I hate to say I told you so, but this is what PXG is doing to the market. For every club that PXG sells for $350, the others will do the same. Its about to get really stupid in the equipment business….

    • Tom

      Apr 13, 2017 at 10:29 am

      as long as there is a demand and there’s money to be made.

      • Tom

        Apr 13, 2017 at 10:34 am

        ya know after thinkin some more I’m wrong. Costco “signature” balls are popular and the price has been kept low.

    • Tyler

      Apr 13, 2017 at 11:06 am

      I was thinking the same thing.

      • Player

        Apr 13, 2017 at 12:03 pm

        I can’t wait for the Kirkland Signature forged irons to come out. Same performance as the C16 for $600 a set

  25. david

    Apr 13, 2017 at 9:33 am

    guys these irons are magical. crazy ball speeds and feel and sound awesome. sold a bunch of sets to all skill levels. guys just hit them better. if you haven’t tried them you don’t know!

    • Dj

      Apr 13, 2017 at 10:51 am

      Hard pass. All marketing. These are no better than their retail offerings. Nothing but a quick money grab

    • Stan

      Apr 13, 2017 at 12:09 pm

      Thanks Lyle Lanley.

    • Joey5Picks

      Apr 13, 2017 at 1:44 pm

      I’m sure they all dropped their handicaps by half.

    • Brian

      Apr 13, 2017 at 3:23 pm

      I’ll stick with my Mizunos and save $2k in the process. Plus I can customize shafts with no upcharge unlike Titeli$t

  26. Brad T

    Apr 13, 2017 at 8:53 am

    perfect for the people who think they can buy a better game.

    • Joe

      Apr 13, 2017 at 9:07 am

      what’s the difference between buying a new driver every year or buying an expensive set of irons? I honestly do not know 1 person with the ability to afford these irons doing so because they think it will make their game better….

      I do, however, know many people who cannot afford the $500 new driver that think it’ll help them lose their slice.

    • Jack

      Apr 13, 2017 at 10:37 am

      I became a pro after I got fitted for these irons. It was that easy. Boom

      • chinchbugs

        Apr 13, 2017 at 12:13 pm

        I was actually selected to the all-universe team after switching to these

  27. Ian

    Apr 13, 2017 at 8:22 am

    Alright, hands up. Who demanded the C16 irons?

    • Tazz2293

      Apr 13, 2017 at 9:24 am

      Averting eyes, whistling softly to self while slowly walking away

    • gdb99

      Apr 13, 2017 at 8:42 pm

      I didn’t, but I hope to hit them in a couple weeks during my Titleist Thursday fitting.

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Rory McIlroy’s putter builder speaks on his winning TaylorMade Soto proto



It’s no secret that Rory McIlroy’s biggest weakness has historically been with his putter. But ahead of the Arnold Palmer Invitational, which he won by two shots, McIlroy made a putter switch and ended up with just 100 putts for the week — the lowest in his PGA Tour career. He also finished first in the field in Strokes Gained: Putting, and put on a putting display for the ages on Sunday to shoot 64 (he birdied 5 of the final 6 holes).

Related: Rory’s Winning WITB from the 2018 Arnold Palmer Invitational 

What’s so special about this putter? To figure that out, I spoke with TaylorMade’s International Tour Director Chris Trott, who worked directly with McIlroy on building his new putter.

Trott explains that McIlroy showed up to Bay Hill “with a different kind of confidence” that week. His caddie, Harry Diamond, showed up to the TaylorMade Tour Truck on Monday night (McIlroy wasn’t on site Monday) with a previous putter of McIlroy’s — a Scotty Cameron that he won multiple majors with, according to Trott — and he wanted to have a new putter built that matched up with the specs of it. “He came with a plan and he wanted to be on spec,” says Trott. So the TaylorMade team sent Harry off to the hotel Monday night with a TaylorMade TP Soto with no face insert, one with an insert, some other variations, and they sent him back to the hotel with a few Spiders, as well, according to Trott.

But since Trott says that McIlroy liked the feel of his previous gamer, Trott thought it was best to send a request back to TaylorMade’s offices in Carlsbad for a TP Black Copper Soto with a midslant neck and a Suryln insert in preparation for McIlroy’s arrival the next day. “Nine out of 10 times we already have a head with the insert in it [inside the tour truck], but this putter is so new,” says Trott. “It’s not even out yet.”

Trott says McIlroy showed up to the Tour Truck the next morning, but he “wasn’t enamored” with the options, although he did fancy the solid face Soto. Here’s the photo notes that Trott took of the solid-faced Soto that McIlroy liked.

Good thing Trott sent that request back to the office, though! The first words out of McIlroy’s mouth when he saw the new TP Black Copper Soto slant neck proto with the Suryln insert, according to Trott, were “Hmm, that’s nice.” But he wanted to tweak the specs. He wanted the putter an eighth of an inch shorter and 3-to-4 swingweight points lighter. Eventually, Trott also added 0.25 degrees of loft to the face compared to McIlroy’s gamer, and made it 1-degree more upright.

The new putter Trott concocted also had a Golf Pride Tradition grip on it, and McIlroy had him change it to a TaylorMade Red Cap Pistol grip.

So, McIlroy took to the putting green with the solid face Soto and the Black Copper slant neck proto with the Surlyn insert. After a few drills, McIlroy decided he liked the feel and look of the Trott concoction, and while he really liked the Black Copper finish, he did have concerns about how it would hold up in the weather.

In the end, McIlroy decided on the TaylorMade TP Black Copper Soto proto. Here are the photo notes that Trott took from inside the trailer while holding McIlroy’s (eventual) winning putter.

The numbers in the photo above mean the specs of McIlroy’s putter are as follows:

  • Weight: 508.3 grams
  • Swing weight: D1
  • Lie angle: 71.25 degrees
  • Loft: 2.75 degrees
  • Length: 34.25 inches

Here are photos that we shot of the putter on Tuesday of the 2018 WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play:

It’s safe to say McIlroy made the right decision for Bay Hill, and according to Trott, he’ll likely be sticking with the putter going forward. And if not, surely Trott and his team will be there with 7-10 more putter options for McIlroy to try out and hand-pick from. Must be nice to be Rory!

See what GolfWRX Members are saying about Rory’s putter in our forums.

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Spotted: Phil Mickelson’s Callaway Mack Daddy PM-Grind “2.0” prototype wedge



More than three years ago, Callaway released a Mack Daddy PM Grind — PM stands for Phil Mickelson — that had a raised toe section for a higher center of gravity. Mickelson liked the PM Grind wedges because the designs allowed him to get more spin on open-faced shots, and also because they created a low trajectory with more spin on square-faced shots, said Roger Cleveland in 2015.

Since 2015, Mickelson has been playing various lofts of Callaway Mack Daddy PM Grind wedges, and with various amounts of lead tape.

On Tuesday at the 2018 WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play event, however, we spotted a new Mack Daddy PM Grind “2.o” wedge in his bag that has a different look. Is this the introduction of a new wedge release from Callaway?!


We spoke to a Callaway representative who, in so many words, said this is just Phil being Phil and tinkering with equipment, not a product launch.

“This is a Phil-specific prototype version of the Mack Daddy PM-Grind Wedge,” said a Callaway representative. “We built it specifically for him. He likes to tweak his clubs, of course, and this is just an example of that. Always a tinkerer!”
We’ll be sure to update you on more information about the PM Grind 2.0 prototype wedge when we have it.
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Adidas launches special edition black Boost colorway



Adidas staffers will be collectively back in black at the WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play this Thursday.

The company announced special edition black colorways for its Tour360, Tour360 Knit, and Crossknit 2.0 models, which players will wear, along with head-to-toe black, at the match play competition.

Adidas Tour360

“Boost changed the game for players when we brought it into our golf category,” said Masun Denison, global footwear director, adidas Golf. “Now with the introduction of this special edition colored Boost, golfers can add another style option to their lineup while still enjoying the benefits that only Boost can deliver.”

Adidas partnered with BASF to develop the proprietary Boost technology, which offers cushioning via highly elastic thermoplastic urethane (TPU) pellets that are then fused together with heat and molded into the midsole shape for each specific model. Adidas cites energy return, unmatched cushioning and comfort along with long-lasting durability as the key benefits of the technology.

Adidas Tour360 Knit

The special edition black Boost colorway is available now and will only be featured in the Tour360 family: Tour360 ($210), Tour360 Knit ($190), Crossknit 2.0 ($160). Supplies are limited.

Adidas Crossknit 2.0

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19th Hole