Connect with us

Opinion & Analysis

His 2-iron goes how far? Dustin Johnson’s distance chart is impressive

Published

on

Dustin Johnson topped Jon Rahm in the final to take home the WGC-Dell Match Play Championship, his second WGC event victory of the year. And even more impressively, the match play triumph is his third W in a row.

TaylorMade filed an interesting look at DJ’s distances and recent preference for an Ultimate Driving Iron 2-iron, rather than a 5-wood, off the tee on tight holes.

f6d5bdcf851c460030be03749a066251-631x420

Dustin Johnson’s TaylorMade UDI 2-iron.

And while TMag didn’t offer a full profile of lofts, here’s a look at his distance gapping on his average full-swing shots.

M1 Driver: 312 yards
M1 3-wood: 282 yards
M1 5-wood: 267 yards
2-iron UDI: 261 yards
4-iron: 236 yards
5-iron: 225 yards
6-iron: 212 yards
7-iron: 200 yards
8-iron: 186 yards
9-iron: 172 yards
PW: 158 yards

As TaylorMade points out, the distances represent averages, not full-bore, on-the-screws blasts. Johnson, of course, has no problem carrying his driver more than 320 yards when he wants to or smoking his 3-wood more than 300 yards off the tee.

And we’ve got his full bag specs as of the WGC-Dell Match Play.

Driver: TaylorMade 2017 M1 (10.5 degrees, set to 11)
Shaft: Fujikura Speeder Evolution 2.0 Tour Spec 661X
Specs: 45.75 inches, tipped 1 inch

Fairway Wood: TaylorMade 2017 M1 3HL (17 degrees, set to 16)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS T1100 6.5 (95 grams)
Length: 42.25 inches

Irons: TaylorMade UDi (2), TaylorMade Tour Preferred MB ’14 (3-PW)
Shafts: Project X HZRDUS Black 6.5 (105 grams), True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100 (3-PW)

Wedges: TaylorMade Milled Grind (52-09 and 60-10)
Shaft: KBS Tour Wedge 120S Black Nickel

Putter: TaylorMade Spider Tour Black
Grip: SuperStroke Pistol GT 1.0
Specs: 35 inches, 2.5 degrees, 69 degrees, E0

Johnson told Taylormade he has an “If it ain’t broke…” attitude toward his bag set-up ahead of the Masters. While he may not tinker with his weaponry to take on Augusta National, rest assured that we’ll let you know if he does.

240926-WGCMatchPlay-8917-e29630-large-1490377254

RELATED: See DJ’s full WITB with pictures here.

Your Reaction?
  • 426
  • LEGIT46
  • WOW74
  • LOL15
  • IDHT7
  • FLOP7
  • OB6
  • SHANK22

69 Comments

69 Comments

  1. Dave R

    Mar 27, 2017 at 10:48 pm

    Pactricknorm, glad your son played in the NHL but what’s your point ? I hope I didn’t miss it. Thanks.

  2. moses

    Mar 27, 2017 at 10:08 pm

    236 yard 4 iron. WOW!!!!!!

  3. Pete

    Mar 27, 2017 at 8:52 pm

    He can easily hit these distances. Just go watch some D1 golfers hit the ball today because they can absolutely pound it. They all work out with trainers and can really move the ball out there. They are much better athletes than in past years because of how specialized their training has become.

  4. Sean

    Mar 27, 2017 at 5:55 pm

    Remember, these numbers are provided by a company trying to sell golf clubs.

    • Michael

      Mar 28, 2017 at 3:59 pm

      So you doubt the veracity of them after watching them him the last few years?

  5. JE

    Mar 27, 2017 at 5:21 pm

    Replayed the final round yesterday. He hit an 8 iron on a 155 par 3. Downhill.

    It did wind up about 10 yards past the pin.

    • Steve

      Mar 27, 2017 at 7:14 pm

      And you really think that represents his “normal” 8 iron?

      • Jack

        Mar 27, 2017 at 10:15 pm

        Who knows how he hit that, perhaps flighted it somewhat to avoid the wind? I don’t doubt his distances, but yeah in tournaments many of his iron shots like 9 iron etc are pretty regular like 160 yard shot or a 140 yard PW. Clearly he varies his shot/swing to hit a specific distance, but those averages are probably all his full swing averages that TM asked him to hit for marketing purposes.

  6. Jmizzle

    Mar 27, 2017 at 5:03 pm

    TV needs to just say swing speed/loft at impact. Those are the 2 things amateurs can’t put together. I’m a low handicapper that struggles with
    distance. I spent time on a launch monitor to see what ‘moves’ would create more speed. None did. No matter what i did, I could not go from 103 mph to 110. I play in a lot of scratch leagues, no one is sniffing 120mph, except some young 6’3″ college kids. For the high speed players i know, none can de-loft the way these guys do. They flip, scoop or slap that ball.

  7. Patricknorm

    Mar 27, 2017 at 3:58 pm

    Here’s a little perspective for the doubters here. My son played in the NHL and watch a 3 handicap when he was 14 because he could hit the ball so far. Using a Taylor Made Burner driver with a steel shaft he won a junior long drive contest with a drive of 282. He could hit a 7 iron 200 yards and he never carried a 3 wood because his 3 iron was about 270. In hockey numbers his slap shot was measured at 97 mph and he was measured on a (golf) launch monitor with a 127 mph swing speed.
    He chose hockey because it was a virtual guarantee career wise. I’m not near as long and I can tell you seeing a drive go 350 yards is a thing of beauty.
    Ironically I’ve seen Dustin Johnson a few times live and he’s impressive. He’s a perfect NHL defenceman, 6’4″ maybe 210 and probably mean as a pit bull. Clearly Johnson made the right choice. He’ll play longer and make far more money in golf. He’d probably be good in many pro sports. Doesn’t hurt Wayne is his father in law either.

    • Barry

      Mar 27, 2017 at 7:14 pm

      No, but he is likely from Canada or the northern US where it is still winter and the people have basically gone insane by this point

      • LOL

        Mar 28, 2017 at 12:10 am

        To someone who got woken up in the middle of the night this comment was great.

      • bachvo

        Mar 29, 2017 at 4:40 am

        best comment by far

        • DeShamBeau

          Mar 29, 2017 at 5:22 pm

          This comment in bonkers and the replies are amazing. Well done, everyone.

    • Steve

      Mar 27, 2017 at 7:15 pm

      What has Dustin Johnson ever done or said that makes you think he’s “probably mean as a pit bull”? Everything I’ve ever seen/heard from him would argue the exact opposite.

    • Jack

      Mar 27, 2017 at 10:20 pm

      Clearly he wants us to know his son played in the NHL and could achieve clubhead speeds up to 127 mph. Proud dad this one.

      Similar comparison would be Sadlowski (though of course Jamie is more talented having won the long drive championship). He can also hit his 7 iron 225. But he can’t make it as a pro golfer on the tours. Distance isn’t everything, but of course it helps. DJ can be long and accurate which is what’s impressive.

    • Michael

      Mar 28, 2017 at 4:03 pm

      First, besides you, who do yo think cares what your kid does? Answer: No one except his mother.

      Second, find somewhere else to hang out. No one here cares for your how to win friends and not make enemies strategy.

    • Michael

      Mar 28, 2017 at 4:04 pm

      There is none other than letting us know his head is inflated beyond the size of the Goodyear blimp.

    • Daniel

      Jun 22, 2018 at 8:50 am

      14yrs old and hitting a 7 iron as far as dy and a 3 iron the same length as djs 5 wood.. dont let the truth get in the way of a good story I’m thinking…

  8. Mark

    Mar 27, 2017 at 3:08 pm

    85 degrees. No wind. Hard fairways. Downhill on a tour spec course. Come to my home course. Soaking wet, cold, damp air. Remember these guys do this for a living and don’t do a days work before playing. Usain Bolt runs very fast and people don’t expect to run as fast as he does so don’t expect to hit it as far as a Pro. And I will have a bet on DJ for the Masters!!

  9. Bob

    Mar 27, 2017 at 2:17 pm

    Lots of folks in denial saying these can’t be accurate but go watch him hit balls on the range and report back. I’m talking in person too. Only egotistical morons would watch him and think these couldn’t possibly be accurate.

  10. Christopher Feltham

    Mar 27, 2017 at 12:40 pm

    I played St Anne’s links, Dublin last monday in a gale….a proper course. They’re off to shelter at the least sign of adverse conditions in the states….Michelson’s shown he can handle British/Irish conditions….come and show us DJ…if your soft enough.

    • Steve

      Mar 27, 2017 at 1:29 pm

      You do realize that sending them “off to shelter” in adverse conditions has more to do with the idiot spectators than the players, right?

  11. Dave

    Mar 27, 2017 at 12:31 pm

    And I have to agree with bandrz, I’ve seen DJ up close and personal at a tournament, both on the range and on the fairway. This dude is tall, and his hands must be 7 ft. in the air when he’s winding one up. There is no one in this comment section that could clean his clubs, much less hit any of their clubs similar distances. DJ is an animal 🙂

    • bandrz

      Mar 27, 2017 at 1:38 pm

      It’s uncanny. And he isn’t missing many fairways right now either. Almost all of these guys bomb it, but DJ stands out and that is hard to do. Rory does too. Thomas Pieters? dude is huge!

    • Bob

      Mar 27, 2017 at 2:27 pm

      Saw him in Austin on Thursday and he was punishing balls into 20 mph winds on the range. Was also completely floored by his size in person. We all know he’s tall and lanky but he appears to be pure lean muscle now. Then you incorporate his flexibility too and he’s just completely different from anyone else. It’s a broken record at this point talking about how he’s such a freak athlete but it really can’t be said enough.

  12. Dave

    Mar 27, 2017 at 12:28 pm

    Well, downhill as Johnny Miller said, he smoked a drive 426 yds. Sunday against John, and got beat since Rahm sent his 438. I don’t care if it’s downhill or not, that’s some impressive distances, and straight down the middle for both of them. I’ll bet they didn’t have 30 yds. wide landing area, and they both hit it. Dang

  13. bandrz

    Mar 27, 2017 at 12:16 pm

    Having seen DJ up close on several occasions, these look about right. If you haven’t seen these guys play in person, I don’t know what to say. Yes, they are that much longer than you.

    • Robin

      Mar 27, 2017 at 8:01 pm

      Years ago, maybe 20, a friend dragged me to an event where John Daly was teamed with another player and they played against two other players . back then Daly was 50 to 75 yards past the other 3 every single hole… Daly hit 330 or better on at least 3 holes with the other 3 out about 270 max. What we see in Johnson is nothing new just better equipment (for sure the ball) better conditioned players…

    • Tom

      Mar 28, 2017 at 11:32 am

      there ya go first hand report…witnessed

  14. Tom

    Mar 27, 2017 at 11:22 am

    Damn! there’s a lot of denial on here

  15. chip

    Mar 27, 2017 at 10:16 am

    those numbers are inflated. he does not hit his 7 iron 200 yards, nor his pw 160.

    • DJ

      Mar 27, 2017 at 12:39 pm

      u do know that his club head at impact is de-lofted which is why he can hit those numbers with those clubs.

    • Michael

      Mar 28, 2017 at 4:07 pm

      You know this how? … Because you say so? Just as I thought.

  16. Jim

    Mar 27, 2017 at 9:56 am

    He’s way longer than these numbers if he wants… from 95-2000 playing mini-tours & section events I averaged 296 off Tee w/ Callaway GBB 9 degree and 45.5 AJ Tech shaft… Callaway BB 1iron 270-275 with AJ Tech also…didn’t carry 3wd for 7 years….

    My PowerBuilt TPI or Titleist DCI irons were close, but 46 PW was full swing 150…

    BALLS….Spalding Tour Edition or Precept EV Extra Spin.

    Bottom line, it’s mostly about speed

    • Jim

      Mar 27, 2017 at 6:22 pm

      Jack, Arnold, Julius could all hit 7irons 200+ They just would’ve had 2 ir trajectory and never stopped on a green….The equipment has changed so much that the swing (at impact) did too. 45 years ago the hackers were fighting the ‘flip’ just as they are now.

      the goal of a low hcp player was to ‘turn an 8 into a 7’ at impact….

      the club head designs, grooves and balls make it so a skilled player can turn an 8 into a 5&3/4 at impact and the gear will produce a ‘tour trajectory’ ball flight that will drop and sit on a green

      the flippers picked up a few yards as the lofts on their 8’s are about what a 7 iron used to be, and the ‘better ones’ can at least keep ‘an 8 an 8’ and not add too much loft at impacr, often getting into the low single hcps with regular play

  17. Johnny

    Mar 27, 2017 at 9:49 am

    Would love to see DJ on Trackman hitting Tour Balata 100’s and Professional 90’s like was done here.

    http://www.andrewricegolf.com/andrew-rice-golf/2011/08/evolution-of-a-golf-ball

  18. Dat

    Mar 27, 2017 at 9:25 am

    If these yardages are true, we are going to continue to see the trend of longer courses, and the longer hitter will always win. Time to change the BALL for tour pros only.

    • Jim

      Mar 27, 2017 at 9:46 am

      GAME BALL! Long past due…Just like every other sport. Won’t affect anyone’s endorsement deal for “their favorite ball / gear”…

      Only ball on practice tee / green, fill up your bag before 1st tee.

      2 year exclusive contract….same ball all year, every event.

      • Steve

        Mar 27, 2017 at 7:18 pm

        Maybe I’m confused, but it sounds like you want everybody to play the exact same ball on the golf course. IF that is indeed what you’re saying, how would that not affect anyone’s endorsement deals? Also, who decides which company makes the ball they play? There is WAY too much money in ball sales for this to ever happen.

        • Jim

          Mar 28, 2017 at 10:33 am

          Just like tennis…Player’s endorse – Wilson, but the tournament ball is Penn…

          golf is SO much more touchy feely it would be a constant source of aggravation AND WHINING if the ball changed every week. I’d be pissed too…
          SO there’s a big contest between the mfrs… trials with various balls for feel etc and – whoever – picks the one for the next season or 2…

          game ball….no problem

      • Gorden

        Mar 28, 2017 at 12:08 am

        And who ever made that game ball would sell millions of them to every foursome in front of me and behind me every Tuesday because they all think/act like their on tour…I keep leaving messages in the club house..”Come on people tour players do take more time to read and make their one putt, lets hurry up the read on that forth putt please”…

        • Jim

          Mar 28, 2017 at 11:01 am

          And that would affect what? They’re already playing some overpriced ball ’cause some tour player does – I’ll bet 70% would drop the ‘tour ball’ in three or four rounds if if cost them 15yds off the tee (make the ball ‘need to be hit reeeally square’ to ‘work best’) or even 5 yds with an 8 iron

    • Robin

      Mar 27, 2017 at 8:11 pm

      NEVER HAPPEN PGA Golf is a business and a business is there to make money…equipment companies are not going to pay the PGA or the players to hit a TOUR ONLY BALL. Do you ever wonder why the pros play 90% of their tournaments on courses even an amateur (not the same length of course) could score better then on most local public courses….and do not bother telling me I am wrong because I have played on 3 pro tournament courses a week after the big boys and 3 out 3 times I beat my handicap. (15). why, because the lies were perfect and on the greens the ball just rolls perfect.

      • Jim

        Mar 28, 2017 at 10:52 am

        No one has to pay them to play it. It’s the official league ball.. If they want to piss and moan and quit the tour because there’s a standard (no doubt excellent) ball they have to play at that level, let em. Not a single one will.

        ya don’t let the loonies run the asylum – even if their money’s paying the rent. What are they going to do? NOT play?….

        Either end this perennial whining about whether or not the ‘ball is legal’ or too hot and have a game ball, or STFU…

        They can’t keep lengthening the courses to a point where extremely talented but not monster long guys have no chance….Increase premium on accuracy (make the rough thicker/deeper from 275-320) throttle down the club a bit, have a game ball – OR like any other physical sport, deal with the fact that someone’s always gonna be stronger and longer, but the field stays same length…

    • Looper

      Mar 28, 2017 at 1:56 pm

      No way… What, make football fields longer, baseball pitchers mounds further back? Nonsense, only a few hit it like a tour pro…

  19. DB

    Mar 27, 2017 at 9:24 am

    I still don’t believe that his driver is 45.75 inches. It sure doesn’t look that long.

    • Teaj

      Mar 27, 2017 at 10:31 am

      I thought the same thing but it could be it looks short just in comparison to his arm length which from what I understand is large. Could be wrong but the only reason I can think of because it does look short.

  20. Jack Wullkotte

    Mar 27, 2017 at 8:44 am

    How can they say the golf ball is legal? Drives in the 350 yards to 400 yards are ludicrous. In the 1940’s, 50’s and 60’s, I was considered a “long hitter.” My drives averaged about 280. In those days, the longest average on tour was about 290. Pitching wedge distance was about 115. Sure, lofts were about 4 degrees weaker on irons, but that would only pick up about an additional 12 to 15 yards. Johnson’s pitching wedge average is 158 yards. It’s not the club, believe me.

    • Shallowface

      Mar 27, 2017 at 8:19 pm

      Finally someone here who knows what he’s talking about. Welcome, sir!

    • Shallowface

      Mar 27, 2017 at 8:22 pm

      If you haven’t already, please visit the “Classic Golf and Golfers” section of the forums. You would be most welcome there.

    • Jack

      Mar 27, 2017 at 10:30 pm

      Currently the longer average drive is 316, not 350-400. Helps to compare apples to apples. There’s been massive changes in ball and equipment as well as athlete fitness (especially golf where they refused to call golfers athletes in the past) over the years. People are also taller and stronger than in the past. Did you see any 6’3 golfers in the 60’s?

  21. Travis

    Mar 27, 2017 at 8:35 am

    I highly doubt these distances are accurate. To win the US Open he took a 6-iron from 190. That was a full swing under-pressure with adrenaline. By this chart above he should have take an 8-iron…

    I’m sure Dustin can hit these numbers if he swing full out, but I highly doubt DJ’s everyday smooth 7-iron is his go to 200y club…

    • Steve

      Mar 27, 2017 at 1:31 pm

      “To win the US Open he took a 6-iron from 190. That was a full swing under-pressure with adrenaline.”

      I’m willing to bet that wasn’t a “full swing… with adrenaline.” Just because it looks like he may be going after it with a full swing on TV doesn’t mean he actually is. I 100% guarantee you that he hits his normal 6 iron over 190 yards, and that’s without the extra adrenaline.

  22. Adam S.

    Mar 27, 2017 at 8:20 am

    The length of the 3-wood at 42.25″ is surprising to me given DJ’s height.

    • CCTxGolf

      Mar 27, 2017 at 9:09 am

      It’s really a 4 wood (3hl) but the length still seems short for how tall he is.

  23. Smitty

    Mar 27, 2017 at 12:16 am

    Might want to watch this video, he carries one of his drives 324 yards at the range:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3YpSSL2R57Y

  24. The dude

    Mar 26, 2017 at 8:52 pm

    No way they are carry yardages………

    • Jack

      Mar 26, 2017 at 10:36 pm

      Yeah I think I’ve seen his trackman numbers where he was hitting some driver and also some irons in the past and the carry distances weren’t that far. TM gave his total distances, and WRX just did a little word play indirectly making people think it’s carry by saying he would have no problem carrying it 320. Actually, I think he would. He would normally hit it carry 300, and 20 yards extra would probably be his max considering he already swings it 120 mph clubhead speed. And max is definitely not a no problem proposition.

      But 158 PW? We normal amateurs have a better chance of achieving pro distances on the shorter clubs because they are easier to hit, but it’s still pretty hard to hit it 158. He hits muscle back clubs too. Try hitting a 47 degree muscleback PW 158 lol. He averages that.

      • Halteclere

        Mar 26, 2017 at 11:59 pm

        I mean he did hit his two iron 300 yards carry in Mexico, granted it was altitude, but it was extremely impressive nonetheless.

        • Jack

          Mar 27, 2017 at 8:49 am

          LOL yeah those distances were crazy in Mexico. Fun for us to watch. Pretty difficult for them to figure out initially. No doubt, DJ is both long and pretty accurate. His total driving is up there. What’s more impressed has been his strokes gained from tee to green, almost 2.5 strokes on the field. Another half stroke with his putting validates his wins this season and number 1 status. He’s dominating.

          • James

            Mar 27, 2017 at 10:37 am

            That might be where these come from, to be fair. The elevation in Mexico would suit these ´averages´

      • Jim

        Mar 27, 2017 at 9:29 pm

        22yrs ago my PW was my 150yd club. I’m not quite as tall – nor lanky and long armed as DJ – and not as delofted at impact. No doubt he’s avg 158 carry – easy.

        flat straight hole on a course I was on staff at in ’96 had a creek running across fairway. 290 from tips & you were in, 312 you were over. As long as i wasn’t hitting into any real wind, ~IF~ I put a good ‘102%’ swing on it, I could clear it most of the time. There’s no doubt this cat is longer than I was, and I had a record 369 yd drive (although I do believe it got a good ‘assist’ from a sprinkler head) 😉

        On the ancient tech from 97, I was swinging 45.5 – 46″ drivers 126 – 130. I have no problem believing those numbers from him

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Podcasts

Gear Dive: USC head golf coach Chris Zambri on the challenges that will come with the new NCAA rules

Published

on

In this Special Edition of The Gear Dive, USC Men’s Head Golf Coach Chris Zambri discusses his thoughts on the new NCAA mandates, how to get recruited, and the pros and cons of recruiting can’t-miss superstars.

  • 9:55 — Zambri discusses thoughts on new rule
  • 17:35 — The rule he feels is the toughest navigate
  • 26:05 — Zambri discusses the disadvantages of recruiting a “can’t miss” PGA star
  • 32:50 — Advice to future recruits
  • 44:45 — The disadvantages of being tied to an OEM as a college golf team

Check out the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes!

Your Reaction?
  • 0
  • LEGIT5
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK0

Continue Reading

Opinion & Analysis

A new NCAA transfer rule gets passed… and college coaches are NOT happy

Published

on

New rules just keep on coming from the NCAA; college coaches are not happy about this one.

In a summer of block buster coaching changes, the NCAA has done its best to stay atop the news cycle by making some significant changes, which will impact the recruitment process. In an article two months ago entitled “The effect the NCAA’s new recruiting rules will have on college golf,” I spoke to college coaches about a new rule, which will not allow unofficial or official visits until September 1 of the players Junior Year. To go along with this rule, the NCAA has also put in place a new recruiting calendar which will limit the sum of the days of off campus recruiting between a head and assistant coach to 45 days starting August 1, 2018.

The 45-day rule will have several potential impacts for both recruits and assistant coaches. For recruits, it is likely that after a couple (2-3) evaluations, coaches will make offers and ask for speed responses to ensure they are not missing out on other options. I also think you will see far less assistant coaches recruiting, which ultimately hurts their opportunities to learn the art of recruitment.

The new transfer rule

In the past, players were subject to asking their present institution for either permission to contact other schools regarding transfer, or a full release.

Now, starting October 15, players can simply inform their institution of their intensions to leave and then start contacting other schools to find an opportunity. This is a drastic shift in policy, so I decided to poll college coaches to get their reactions.

The poll was conducted anonymously via Survey Monkey. Participation was optional and included 6 questions:

  1. New NCAA Legislation will allow players to transfer without a release starting October 2018. Do you support this rule change?
  2. Do you believe that this rule will have APR implications?
  3. Who do you think will benefit most from this rule?
  4. What are the benefits of allowing students to transfer without a release? What are the potential harms?
  5. New NCAA Legislation will make December a dead period for recruiting off campus. Do you support this legislation?
  6. What implications do you see for this rule?

In all, 62 Division I golf coaches responded, or about 10 percent of all Division I coaches in Men’s and Women’s Golf. The results show that 81.25 percent of DI coaches said that they do NOT support the rule change for transfers.

Also, 90 percent of coaches polled believe that the rule will have APR implications. APR is Academic Progress Rate which holds institutions accountable for the academic progress of their student-athletes through a team-based metric that accounts for the eligibility and retention of each student-athlete for each academic term.

The APR is calculated as follows:

  • Each student-athlete receiving athletically related financial aid earns one point for staying in school and one point for being academically eligible.
  • A team’s total points are divided by points possible and then multiplied by 1,000 to equal the team’s Academic Progress Rate.
  • In addition to a team’s current-year APR, its rolling four-year APR is also used to determine accountability.

Teams must earn a four-year average APR of 930 to compete in championships.

While the APR is intended as an incentive-based approach, it does come with a progression of penalties for teams that under-perform academically over time.

The first penalty level limits teams to 16 hours of practice per week over five days (as opposed to 20 over six days), with the lost four hours to be replaced with academic activities.

A second level adds additional practice and competition reductions, either in the traditional or non-championship season, to the first-level penalties. The third level, where teams could remain until their rate improves, includes a menu of possible penalties, including coaching suspensions, financial aid reductions and restricted NCAA membership.

Clearly coaches are not happy about the move and feel that the rule unfairly benefits both the student athletes and major conference schools, who may have a swell of calls around middle of October as Student athletes play great fall golf and look to transfer. Although coaches are unhappy about the new rule, it is very difficult to predict what direct impact the rule will have on teams; coaches are extremely smart and understand recruiting and development within the frame work of college better than anyone can imagine. As a result, I think coaches will react in many ways which are impossible to predict.

The survey also asked, “new NCAA Legislation will make December a dead period for recruiting off campus. Do you support this legislation?” For this, coaches were more divided with 45 percent in favor of the rule, and 55 percent not.

Although coaches supported the legislation, many (41/62) suggested that it would potentially hurt international recruiting at tournaments like Doral and the Orange Bowl and they had, in the past, used December as a time to recruit.

As we move forward with these changes, here are some potential things that recruits, and their families should consider, including consequences of the rules:

  1. With a limit of 45 days and these transfer rules, it is likely that coaches will be doing significantly more investigation into a player’s personalities and family situation to make sure they know what they are getting.
  2. Coaches may also start skipping over better players in favor of kids they think will be a good fit and are likely to stay
  3. Rosters may get bigger, as coaches are trying to have larger numbers to potentially offset transfers

Unfortunately, we enter a new era of rules at the worst time; we have never had a more competent and deep group of college coaches, the clear majority of whom are tremendous stewards of the game. Hopefully this rule will have insignificant effect on the continued growth of college golf but only time will tell.

Your Reaction?
  • 39
  • LEGIT7
  • WOW9
  • LOL2
  • IDHT2
  • FLOP3
  • OB1
  • SHANK23

Continue Reading

Opinion & Analysis

Is golf actually a team sport?

Published

on

Do a little research on the top PGA Tour players, and what you’ll see is that most (if not all of them) employ a team of diverse professionals that support their efforts to perform on the golf course. Take two-time major champion Zach Johnson; he has a team that includes a caddie, a swing instructor, a sports psychologist, a physiotherapist, an agent, a statistician, a spiritual mentor, a financial adviser… and of course his wife.

“I know this seems like a lot, and maybe even too much,” Johnson readily admitted. “But each individual has their place. Each place is different in its role and capacity. In order for me to practice, work out and just play golf, I need these individuals along the way. There is a freedom that comes with having such a great group that allows me to just play.”

My best guess is that Zach Johnson commits hundreds of thousands of dollars each year to this team, and I assume most players on the leading professional tours are making significant investments in their “teams.” There are three questions that jump out at this point. First, is a team necessary? Second, how can anyone compete without one? And third, how to pay for it?

From the club player to the collegiate player to the aspiring/touring professional, everyone can benefit from a team that offers individual instruction, support, guidance, and encouragement. Such a team, however, needs to be credible, timely, beneficial and affordable.

To be affordable, serious golfers should build their team one piece at a time. The obvious first choice is a swing coach. Golf swing coaches charge from $100-$1,500 per hour. The cost explains why players have historically been responsible for their own practice. The next piece, which is a newly developing trend, should be a performance coach who specializes in the supervision of practice, training and tournament preparation. Performance coaching on-site fees range from $200 to $3,000 per day.

So is team support essential for a player to be as good as he/she can be? My research says it is. When a player schedules a practice session, that session is usually based on what the player likes to do or wants to do. “Best Practices” utilized by world-class athletes suggest strongly that great progress in training always occurs when someone other than the player writes, administers and supervises the programs and sessions. The team approach says the player should focus on what needs to be done. Sometimes what the player wants to do and the things needed to be done are the same thing; sometimes they aren’t.

Now for the question of how to pay for it all. Wealthy players, or those with substantial or institutional support, have access to what they need or want… whatever the cost. If you use an on-site coach, teacher or other professional you will be paying for blocks of time. Fees can be hourly, weekly, monthly, yearly or lifetime arrangements based upon several factors. If your coach of choice is not local, you can also incur travel and per diem expenses. The process of paying for someone’s time can really add up. You can review what I charge for various services that require my attendance at edmyersgolf.com.

For those of you who don’t have easy access to on-site expertise or don’t want to incur the expense, I want to offer an approach that business, industry, colleges/universities and entrepreneurs are turning to: “Distance Coaching.” Distance learning is made possible through modern technology. In today’s world, expertise can be delivered using FaceTime, Skype, texting, email and (old fashion) phone calls. Textbooks, videos, specific programs and workbooks can be accessed from anywhere at any time by anyone with a desire to do so… and who knows what’s coming in the future. Through Distance Coaching, individuals can employ professional expertise on an as-needed basis without incurring huge costs or expenses.

The primary team expenses that can be avoided are those associated with face-to-face, on-site visits or experiences. Distance Coaching brings whatever any player needs, wants or desires within financial reach. For example, a player in Australia can walk onto the practice ground and have that day’s practice schedule delivered to a personal device by his/her performance coach. The player then forwards the results of that session back to the coach — let’s say in Memphis, Tennessee. The player is then free to move onto other activities knowing that the performance, training and preparation process is engaged and functioning. In the same vein, that same player in Australia may have moved into learning mode and he/she is now recording the golf swing and is sending it to the swing teacher of choice for analysis and comment.

So what is the cost of Distance Coaching? Teachers, trainers and coaches set their own fees based upon their business plan. Some require membership, partnership or some other form of commitment. For example, I offer free performance coaching with the purchase of one of my books or programs, as do others. Where face-to-face, on-site fees for performance coaching is available for $200 a day, the same expertise from the same coach can cost as little as $50 a month using the distance format, tools and technology. I highly recommend that players responsibly research the options available to them and then build the best team that fits their games, desires and goals. I’m happy to forward a guide of what to look for in a performance coach; just ask for it at edmyersgolf@gmail.com.

Back to Zach Johnson; he recently admitted that his lack of recent success could be traced to his lack of focus and practice discipline. Additional, he concedes that he has been practicing the wrong things. “It goes back to the basics,” he said. “I have to do what I do well. Truth be told, what I’m practicing now is more on my strengths than my weaknesses.”

Zach Johnson has a great team, but as he concedes, he still needs to put in the work.

Your Reaction?
  • 11
  • LEGIT2
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK6

Continue Reading

19th Hole

Facebook

Trending