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More Grooves, More Precision: TaylorMade launches Milled Grind wedges

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TaylorMade has officially launched the Milled Grind wedges that we spotted at the 2016 Shriners Hospitals for Children Open.

After working closely with its staffers, TaylorMade developed three different grinds for various types of swings and playing conditions with the new wedges, which are made from soft 8620 carbon steel.

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  • LB (Low Bounce): A “C-type” sole with relieved rear section.
  • SB (Standard Bounce): Relieved heel section, beneficial on open-faced shots.
  • HB (High Bounce): The sole has wide camber for “added lift.”

As the name implies, the leading edges and soles of the wedges are CNC-milled for greater consistency in manufacturing and performance. The milling process also ensures “leading edge symmetry to the score lines, leading edge radiuses, and sole grind geometry,” according to a TaylorMade press release. These are important qualities for golfers in order to maintain the proper impact and turf interaction while using each wedge loft and grind.

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Compared to its Tour Preferred EF predecessors, the Milled Grind wedges have a deeper bore where the shaft is inserted, going from 1 inches to 1.5 inches deep, which is visible with a red polymer plug in the heel. This design helped TaylorMade move weight away from the heel and move center of gravity more toward the center of the club where it’s desired.

The grooves of the Milled Grind wedges also have steeper side walls, sit closer together, and have one additional groove on each wedge to produce more spin.

TaylorMade’s Milled Grind wedges will sell for $149.99 each starting March 3.

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8 Comments

8 Comments

  1. L. Moore

    May 19, 2017 at 9:06 am

    It seems that so many commenters, mostly the same ones, always complain about
    the price of new equipment that they’ve not even tried. While I game Edel wedges,
    I’ve tried these and they are very good sticks.
    Perhaps the 2ndSwing site it the site they should frequent. I’d much rather hear from
    those that have tried the equipment.

  2. rex235

    Jan 20, 2017 at 12:10 am

    TM “Red Button” Wedges?

    Really?

  3. Bud

    Jan 19, 2017 at 5:36 pm

    Not interested. At all. Especially for $160 a pop. Since when did all the clubmakers start colluding and start selling all their wedges for $160? Just a few years ago they were $99, then it moved to $130 and now Titelist, TM and Callaway are all charging $160 for their new wedges. Just ridiculous

    • lco21

      Jan 20, 2017 at 11:28 am

      For what it’s worth, I was taking a look at the TM website and they are listed at $149.99 not $159.99. Not saying it couldn’t change but the other new items are listed correct and correspond to what was reported on WRX.

      Doesn’t change your point much however.

      • Zak Kozuchowski

        Jan 20, 2017 at 2:05 pm

        We have corrected the price listed. It is $149.99 each.

  4. DC1

    Jan 18, 2017 at 6:30 pm

    I really like my ef wedges, might have to try these some day after I have worn out my current ones.

  5. S Hitter

    Jan 18, 2017 at 5:10 pm

    These MUST be better than the EF grooves, otherwise TM have made a serious mistake.

  6. golfraven

    Jan 18, 2017 at 4:29 pm

    Am I the only one who sees same appearance as the Wilson STAFF FW6 Wedge from 2007. You would think technology and style evolved in the last decade but seems not to be the case for TM wedeges. Good luck selling those.

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Equipment

Forum Thread of the Day: “Lighter shaft for dealing with joint tiredness?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from Zigzog, who is a long-time golfer searching for the best methods for dealing with joint tiredness and aching elbow pain during/following his rounds. Zigzog has been considering moving to a lighter shaft to reduce the pain, and our members have been sharing their tips and tricks on the subject.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • Galanga: “Passenger in the same boat. I believe lighter weight and shock absorption is the ticket — many stories to of it working on this site. I second the prior poster’s suggestion to not go down in weight too quickly. For me, the graphite shaft selection effort has been a rabbit hole. Probably best to go to a fitter w lots of options and expertise.”
  • KensingtonPark: “I am in a similar position as you. I am experimenting with tour weighted graphite shafts in my irons. It definitely seems to help, as vibration more than weight is the source of my joint fatigue. That and a lack of stretching…”
  • rwc356: “I’ve been playing 50+ years and started feeling my age about 10 years ago. While I never had a plus handicap, I did play to a single digit handicap until my early 50’s. Arthritis and other health issue started creating havoc with my game, and I made the transition to graphite and more forgiving clubs. I was afraid to leave what I knew, and so I converted a few clubs (5 iron and 7 iron) to graphite and tried them for a number of rounds. It wasn’t long before I realized that I could play them as well as steel shafts and so I added the rest of short irons. Been playing 3 seasons with graphite and not sure I could go back. I love old blades and have a number of sets which I sneak back to every so often – result is always the same, shaft too heavy and body too sore. Good luck with finding a solution that fits your game best.”
  • jjfcpa: “I’m 72 years old and didn’t start playing golf till I was 67, so I have no memory of what it was like to play steel shafts or have a fast swing speed. I find that playing lighter shafts (in my case graphite) to be much easier on the joints. I also found that doing strength training at the gym doing the offseason really makes it much easier to maintain your performance level during the golf season.”

Entire Thread: “Lighter shaft for dealing with joint tiredness?”

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Whats in the Bag

Tyrrell Hatton’s winning WITB: 2019 Turkish Airlines Open

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Driver: Ping G410 Plus (9 degrees set at 8.4)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana RF 60-TX

Fairway wood: TaylorMade M6 HL (16.5 degrees, bent to 15.7)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD TP 7X

Fairway wood: Ping G410 (20.5 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD TP 8X

Irons: Ping i210 (4-PW)
Shafts: Nippon Modus3 Tour 120 X

Wedges: Ping Glide Forged (50 degrees), Titleist Vokey Design SM7 Raw (54-08M, 60-10S)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Putter: Ping Vault Oslo

Grips: Golf Pride New Decade MCC

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

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Equipment

WRX Spotlight: Cobra King Forged TEC irons

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The skinny: As Ryan Barath first reported, the introduction of the newest Cobra King Forged TEC irons for 2020, it is taking speed and forgiveness to a whole new level.

Behind what appears to be an extremely traditional-looking muscleback iron hides a huge amount of technology designed to help players of all abilities, whether it be with a traditional variable-length set or with Cobra’s One Length set—more on that latter. The King Forged TEC irons are a hollow-body design that utilizes a thin face supported by what Cobra engineers call energizing foam microspheres, to both fine-tune acoustics (sound/feel) of the head, while also supporting the PWRSHELL Face for increased ball speeds, according to the company.

Our take on Cobra King Forged TEC irons

Not only do the new Cobra Forged TEC irons pass the eyeball test, but the engineers at Cobra have also developed a club with excellent performance.

In our own testing, the clubs had several features which really stood out

Performance out of the rough: with the low tungsten insert, the low center of gravity performs outstanding from thick lies.

Face consistency: with other similar clubs, our experience is that perfectly struck shots tend to “fly”, sometimes flying considerably longer. With the Forged Tec, the face is incredibly consistent. Off-center hits, particularly off the toe, fly remarkably well.

Chipping: with a clean look, and little offset, one of the additional nuances of these clubs is how good they are to chip (pitch) with.

When ordering the set, keep in mind that there is only a two-degree difference between the 5 (23 degrees) and 4-iron (21 degrees). This lead to some uneven gapping and as a result, we discarded the 4-iron and instead decided to bend the 5-iron, one degree strong.

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