Connect with us

Equipment

10 Things You Need to Know About Ping’s i200 Irons

Published

on

When Ping released its iBlade irons, our review called them “intelligent blades,” a fitting description of an iron that was designed to look and feel like a blade, but offer more forgiveness.

The Ping i200 irons are again blurring the line of blade and cavity-back irons. They’re made to have the forgiveness of cavity-backs, but deliver the clean looks and workability you’d expect from more compact irons. They’re so well rounded, in fact, that Ping expects 20-40 percent of its staffers will put the i200s in play in 2017, including Lee Westwood and Brooke Henderson… and many more Tour players will have them in play as part of a combo set.

The Phoenix-based company also has a few tricks up its sleeve with this release, including a “secret-menu option” for those who need a little boost.

Ping’s i200 irons (3-9, PW, UW) are available for pre-order today, and will sell for $135 with steel shafts ($150 with graphite shafts). Here are 10 things you need to know about them.

1) Workable AND Forgiving

f1498a84760e8a8e0c08b81c9cb28fdb

How is it possible that an iron built for forgiveness can still be workable? Isn’t it impossible to both produce more side spin AND eliminate side spin at the same time? Not exactly. Marty Jertson, Senior Design Engineer at Ping explains:

“Think of iBlades as a sports car and [Ping’s] G or Gmax irons as luxury sedan,” Jertson says. “iBlades are more workable because you have more control over the face alignment and how the face returns to impact. The reduced torque pressure makes it easier for you to turn the face, but they still increase inertia around the center of gravity CG, making it the Holy Grail of blade irons… workable AND forgiving.”

Ping uses the same concept in its i200 irons, only to a lesser extent than the iBlades. While their compact head shape and thin top rails allow the golfer to manipulate the face as it moves through space, the physics of the iron’s design mean higher inertia around the center of gravity.

So if iBlades are intelligent blades, Ping’s i200 irons could be considered the sports cars of cavity backs.

2) “Smoosh Central”

You’ll notice a familiar look with i200 irons… something similar to Ping’s S55s irons, which have garnered a cult-like following.

Golfers liked Ping’s S55 irons because of their clean looks and sneaky forgiveness, according to Jertson, so Ping engineers wanted to maintain aspects of the S55 design while enhancing feel with the i200s.

9b8ae997b8b774b6c5a9eafd3311e22b

The i200 irons, made from 431 stainless steel, have a soft feel that makes it seem like the ball stays on the face longer; or as Jertson calls it, “smoosh central.” That’s due to the materials and new construction.

Ping’s i200 irons have a thicker top portion of the face and a thinner lower portion, helping drop the center of gravity (CG) for a higher launch. It also gives the irons more ball speed on shots hit low on the club face, where most players tend to contact their iron shots. The i200 irons also have longer CTPs (custom tuning ports). They’re made from elastomer and have been moved closer to the face in the i200 design, helping provide golfers a squishy, yet powerful feel.

Overall, the club faces have a thickness of about 0.68 millimeters, which is about half the thickness of the S55 irons, according to Ping. That leads to both more ball speed off the face and more moment of inertia (MOI), a measure of ball speed retention in mishits.

3) A New Look, Down to the Details

ef699721ec05595e6003c24f2e547c39

The i200s are designed with straighter leading edges in the long irons (3-7 irons) and thinner top rails on the short irons (6-PW) than their i predecessors. The irons also have a shape that looks more rounded near the toe, along with a smoother transition area from the hosel to the club face. The more blended transition means they will appear to have less offset than they do.

The progressive look of the irons throughout the set will play well for golfers looking to create a combo set with the iBlades (short irons from the iBlade set for more precision, long irons from the i200 set for more shot height, forgiveness and distance).

9ab6852ac7a34f2ddf4d2dc5dbf6da63

Inspired by vintage blades, the i200 irons also have a longer ferrule than previous i irons for a more classic look. Little things like the metallic iron numbers are buffed to offer the look of precision, as well.

4) The Low-Toe Theory

Throughout Ping’s history, the company has designed irons with more weight in the toe section of its club heads in order to center mass in the head; without added weight in the toe, CG tends to be heel-ward.

e88a5b1bb8d585b2293b6bffa0645f06

Like Ping irons from the past, the i200 irons have cavities that are machined to move weight into the high- and low-toe areas. For golfers, that means a more forgiving iron, especially when hit off the toe, which is the likely miss for most golfers.

5) The Importance of Yardage Gapping

Ping looked to data from its Tour players and their past iron releases to develop iron lofts in the i200 iron sets.

The long irons, which have thinner faces, go about 6-8 yards farther than the previous i-series irons, according to Jertson. In order to prevent the short iron yardage gaps from being too wide, the short irons in the set are made with thicker faces, effectively reducing ball speed.

If you want more distance with each iron, respectively, Ping has something for you…

6) Sauced Up with the Power Spec

New with the i200 irons is a secret-menu option called the “power spec,” which systematically jacks the lofts on each iron.

“It’s like ordering animal style at In-and-Out,” Jertson says. “We’ll juice the irons with stronger lofts … golf’s supposed to be fun, right?”

Plus, the stronger-lofted irons are good for high-spin players looking to flatten out their trajectory. Here’s a look at the loft specs.

Screen Shot 2017-01-15 at 1.43.41 PM

7) Full-On Swing Weight Command

316fd980eeb4fef5811ed6002524882d

A major part of club fitting is getting the correct swing weight, and Ping uses what it calls Custom Tuning Ports (CTP) to help golfers dial in those specifications.

“Swing weight progression is very important,” says Jertson. “If it’s 1.5 points light, that could definitely throw you off. [Golfers] need consistency, so tempo, speed and shaft have to match.”

As Jertson explains, you can hedge against a certain miss using swing weight. For example, if you tend to miss right you’ll want to make the head lighter, effectively lowering the swing weight and helping you to “get the club around” better, he says.

The CTPs used in the i200 irons range from 4 to 32 grams each, the “standard” being 10-12 grams. They’re longer from heel to toe than in previous Ping irons, which helps makes the clubs more forgiving. The tuning ports also have a dampening effect to improve sound and feel.

8) Ping looked to its wedges when designing the soles

66d4ba1d98e915d24d9958fc98206890

Bounce, a term that’s mostly associated with wedges, is just as important in iron design. Generally speaking, more bounce means more forgiveness, so the i200s are made with more bounce than the iBlades and previous i-series irons. With a rounder leading edge that’s designed with 1-degree more bounce angle, the irons won’t want to dig as much, thus reducing divot size and depth.

The “hottest i-series iron was the i20s,” according to Jertson, and these irons will perform similarly through the turf.

9) Hydropho-what?

a0afafefc4637e0c38b7ad46a63a1980

Ping engineers designed the faces of the i200 irons with milling marks to help repel the water and grass that lowers spin and alters flight. At impact, the milling marks are said to create a more consistent trajectory by increasing friction, meaning less flyers and knuckle balls.

The iron’s finish, called Hydro Pearl Chrome, enhances hydrophobicity, or the ability of an object to repel water. The angle of the milling marks and the grooves is designed to do the same.

10) Custom Only

86a56c26ca19943cf67afc3ea1d91840

The stock AWT 2.0 shafts from Ping are made by Nippon, and increase in weight as golfers move from their long irons to their short irons. It’s a “very complex shaft thats very expensive with variable steps and variable wall thickness that’s great for the masses,” Jertson says.

There are also various aftermarket shafts available from Ping at no upcharge: True Temper Dynamic Gold, Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 105, XP 95, and Project X.

i200 Specs (3-9, PW, UW)

  • Stock steel shaft: PING AWT 2.0 (R, S, X)
  • After-market shaft options (no upcharge): Project X 5.0, 6.0; XP 95 (R300, S300), N.S. Pro Modus3 105 (S, X), KBS Tour (R, S, X), Dynamic Gold (S300, X100)
  • Stock graphite shaft: PING CFS 65/70/80 (Soft R, R, S)
  • $135 per club (steel shaft); $150 per club (graphite shaft)

Related: See more photos of the Ping i200 irons in our forums, and join the discussion. 

Your Reaction?
  • 901
  • LEGIT100
  • WOW103
  • LOL29
  • IDHT16
  • FLOP21
  • OB17
  • SHANK83

He played on the Hawaii Pacific University Men's Golf team and earned a Masters degree in Communications. He also played college golf at Rutgers University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.

39 Comments

39 Comments

  1. Jannette Simpliciano

    Feb 4, 2020 at 8:20 pm

    This blog about 10 Things You Need to Know
    About Ping?s i200 Irons. has helped me enormously, is a
    very good topic. What product helped me lose weight, I recommend you see here: https://s96.me/fit (or click on the name).
    Kiss you All!

  2. Hammer

    Feb 19, 2017 at 8:12 pm

    Hello fellow golfers , after playing 3 more rounds of golf on my home course , I have but one thing to say, WOW I love these I200 Ping irons. So consistent, so forgivable and so easy to move left or right. Need I say more.

  3. Hammer

    Feb 14, 2017 at 4:34 pm

    I am a 4 handicapp golfer that has been playing the Iblades since they came out. I thought these were the best irons ping ever made. With great hesitation a friend of mine convinced me to try his I200 irons with the same 95 steelefiber shafts I have in my irons. He does not have the stronger lofts in his irons. WOW were these irons a surprise, they definitely have a softer feel than my Iblades and even though some of the lofts were weaker than my irons , there was no loss of distance at all. I also felt the ground interaction with the sole to be much improved. Although these irons are not pure blades , the ability to move the ball left or right was very easy. These are now my favorite irons to date. Last but not late the forgiveness in these irons was also slightly improved it seamed. I would need to play more than 2 rounds to be sure however. I have purchased these from my local golf store and already put my shafts in them, I will give an update after several more rounds are completed

  4. Forsbrand

    Jan 17, 2017 at 7:17 am

    Look really nice irons lots of playability and forgiveness

    I for one need to be looking at a good sized head early Sunday mornings after skinful the night before, peanut headed blades make me so nervous

  5. Pat

    Jan 17, 2017 at 6:34 am

    Any word if there is going to be a ping g200 coming

  6. edge of lean

    Jan 17, 2017 at 4:37 am

    Grown on me in the last week. Will have to hit them now. I suspect it will turn out to be another case of great clubs I can’t afford right now.

  7. Hitter

    Jan 17, 2017 at 2:23 am

    These look great.. will have to go some to beat the S55s

  8. Rolo

    Jan 16, 2017 at 5:12 pm

    WRXrs will be disappointed that there is no option to de-power spec the loft since they hit it so far already.

    • John

      Jan 16, 2017 at 6:34 pm

      I just loathe the the golfers who are condescending to other fellow golfers if they don’t play 28 degree 5 iron etc. If you want to play a 28 degree 5 iron go ahead, more power to you. Personally I prefer my 5 iron to be about 24 degrees. My choice for which I need no one’s approval.

    • hdcp0

      Jan 16, 2017 at 9:43 pm

      LoL….so true

  9. Jim

    Jan 16, 2017 at 1:44 pm

    Didn’t the I Series just come out last year? Why would they release a replacement so soon?

    • John

      Jan 16, 2017 at 2:26 pm

      Actually I think the I series irons came out about September 2015 Typical Ping 18 month release cycle.

  10. birdy

    Jan 16, 2017 at 11:16 am

    i200? sorry…i don’t see whats so great about these. look like an old tm rac. the name is odd.

    i’m sure they are great irons…but nothing stands out that makes me think ‘have to hit these’

  11. golfraven

    Jan 16, 2017 at 10:35 am

    Will certainly give those a demo. My i20s need a succesor.

  12. AC

    Jan 16, 2017 at 10:33 am

    Fantastic! The more the iron looks like a blade or CB but performs like a GI club the better. I much prefer the solid no frills iron vs those gimmicky colorful irons.

  13. Ay Eye

    Jan 16, 2017 at 10:18 am

    Wait, so there won’t be an i30?

    • Mikec

      Jan 16, 2017 at 2:25 pm

      No, it went i20, i25, iE1, i200….there never was or will be a i30

  14. Lee

    Jan 16, 2017 at 9:39 am

    The ‘Power Spec’ loft option oh dear! As we all know if you get fitted properly the shaft, grip, loft and lie will be matched to your playing characteristics anyway.

    • John

      Jan 16, 2017 at 10:40 am

      Oh Goody – We had the obligatory these aren’t a blade comments from Juan & know we get the “hey everybody go get fitted properly” comment. Personally I like the power loft option & am sure I could get properly fitted for the power lofts if I decided to go that route.

  15. Shane

    Jan 16, 2017 at 9:39 am

    Why only the 5.0 & 6.0 offered as no upcharge in the Px? Where’s the 5.5?

  16. Juan

    Jan 16, 2017 at 9:19 am

    They may be good irons, but there is nothing blade-like about them. Large head, offset, thick sole, and the large cavity in the back. There is nothing about them that calls to mind a blade, and marketing speak aside, I doubt the performance truly resembles that of a blade, either.

    • Buford T Justice

      Jan 16, 2017 at 9:46 am

      Yes, Yes, Yes. Because you personally need the performance of a real deal blade, and could in no way benefit from a club like the i200.

      This review is for the i200, however, the blade brigade must pipe in and remind us that this is in no way, shape, or form, a blade.

      I think I’ve got it, champ! This isn’t a blade, doesn’t perform like a blade, and the article doesn’t suggest it’s a blade. Evidently i200s are good enough for Westwood on the men’s side, and Henderson on the women’s side. So, keep fighting the good fight, sparky.

      Oh, and let us know how you do at the CareerBuilder at La Quinta the weekend.

      Oh…wait…nevermind.

      • birdy

        Jan 16, 2017 at 11:14 am

        calm down cupcake…no one said these weren’t good….they simply aren’t blades. don’t resemble blades. looks like you’re an awful angry person in the morning

      • Buck

        Jan 16, 2017 at 12:39 pm

        Why the personal attacks? He was simply stating his opinion about the product in the article. Birdy is right, you seem like an awful angry person. “There are a lot of decaffeinated brands on the market today that are just as tasty as the real thing”

        As far as the clubs, they are good looking irons, but I just don’t see $135 worth of club here. To each their own

      • Juan

        Jan 17, 2017 at 10:23 am

        The article compares them to blades 4 times by the end of the first “thing you need to know”. Ping makes good irons, and I’m sure these will perform well, but my comment is in response to what I believe to be an inaccurate comparison to blade irons. The items I mentioned are all different than most blade designs that I have seen.
        I made no statements as to whether one head design is better than another, so the personal attacks are unwarranted.

    • DaveJ

      Jan 16, 2017 at 3:09 pm

      I dunno, that at address picture looks pretty blade-like to me, which is the main thing they were going for, right? A more forgiving smallish cavity back that still feels pure like a blade, looks like a blade at address, yet still has a bit of workability sounds like a quality club. Obviously they aren’t MP33s, but they have a similar look behind the ball, even if they play quite a bit differently.

      DaveJ

    • John

      Jan 16, 2017 at 5:13 pm

      They may be good irons, but there is nothing DIVER-like about them. Large head, offset, thick sole, and the large cavity in the back. There is nothing about them that calls to mind a DRIVER, and marketing speak aside, I doubt the performance truly resembles that of a DRIVER, either.

      • Juan

        Jan 17, 2017 at 10:25 am

        Does anyone read? The article compares the irons to blades several times.

        • Scooter McGavin

          Jan 17, 2017 at 12:23 pm

          Do you even read? Just because the article references the iblades and uses the word “blades” it doesn’t mean it was trying to describe the i200’s as blades. In fact, it describes them as “the sports car of cavity backs”. But somehow you interpreted the author as saying that the clubs were blade-like… even though it said nothing of the sort. They were comparing them to the iblades and the technology used in that model to reduce head size and to explain how this model fit into the Ping lineup. I swear, people don’t read anything in context anymore and just throw up the red flag as soon as they see a buzzword they are looking for.

  17. LOL

    Jan 16, 2017 at 9:16 am

    LOL GolfWRX guys are going to LOVE the POWER SPEC JACKED LOFTS

    • John

      Jan 16, 2017 at 11:12 am

      I think they compare to Mizuno JPX 900 forged in head size, but even in the power specs Ping’s are weaker than the mizuno’s.

  18. T

    Jan 16, 2017 at 9:14 am

    Jacked lofts……. had to keep up with Taylormade somehow. Nothing to do with Tour input. Just didn’t want to get left behind by Taylormade.

    • LOL

      Jan 16, 2017 at 9:17 am

      PING has been jacking their lofts way before these oddly named irons. I like the idea of the iblades, but these not so much.

      • Billy

        Apr 25, 2017 at 6:53 am

        Hit them. Went to a demo days looking for Srixon, Mizuno, or Callaway and these blew me out of the water. Normally an S300 guy. I tried the AWT first, then XP 95 S300, KBS Tour S and Pro Modus S. No comparison for me. The AWT is the one. I went back up and down the other companies tents 3 times. I bought the i200s.

  19. Dat

    Jan 16, 2017 at 9:09 am

    A great successor to the S55. Should have stuck with that moniker imo.

    • John

      Jan 16, 2017 at 10:21 am

      iblade is the S55 replacement. These replace the previous i series. Two completely different clubs.

Leave a Reply

Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Equipment

Today from the Forums: “Favorite Miura iron of all time?”

Published

on

Today from the Forums, we take a look at a discussion on Miura irons. Asked by moorebaseball which Miura irons are their favorite, our members go into detail on just why they love the model they do, with a variety of the brand’s irons receiving some love.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • bvanlieu: “CB57 was a good looker when I hit them, but I like the CB1008 a tad more in the looks department and felt a smidge more forgiving to me. Never got to hit them but MC501’s seem to blend with the MBs nicely, great top line. I can’t stop hitting my CB’s this winter on range/sim just yummy. Baby Blades tend to get the vote for best looking from the many commenters I have seen. I agree they are good to look at and feel well, Miura like. I just like me some forgiveness for my low/mid cap game.”
  • speeder757: “Tournament Blade All Day Every Day.”
  • pearls24: “I don’t know about best ever, but the MB101 is awesome. Way better for me than the 501’s due to less offset. I loved everything about the 501’s except couldn’t get past the offset in the shorter irons. 101’s setup perfect behind the ball.”
  • EaglesGolf99: Baby Blades, CB•57s, CB•1008s, and CB•301s.That’s my personal Top 4. Interested to see what the TB Zero turns into in the Global Line!”
  • vmann: “I’ve played baby blades 5-p for the last year and a half. I absolutely love the look and feel. Just got the 3 and 4 iron to match. Can’t wait for the snow to clear to check them out. I haven’t played any other Miuras, so obviously, bb’s are my favorite. I highly recommend.”

Entire Thread: “Favorite Miura iron of all time?”

Your Reaction?
  • 0
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW1
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK1

Continue Reading

Equipment

Confessions of a gear junkie in Korea: My new Ballistic Golf irons

Published

on

As an avid golfer and a self-professed equipment junkie, few things in life are better than discovering a piece of shiny new golf gear that brings a smile to my face and a dent to my wallet. And in Korea, where outpacing the Joneses is a national pastime, one has to be vigilant to stay ahead of the crowd.

To onlookers, most Korean golfers might come across as posers who seem more interested in looking good than playing well. It is not unusual for a set of clubs and golf bag to exceed $10K, and the 500-plus custom golf fitting studios across the country are our playground.

The colorful world of Korean golf.

Searching for the latest and greatest

The equipment and fashion we use and wear here will probably make most golfers in the Western hemisphere question our masculinity. But as the saying goes, “When in Gangnam…”

Koreans have a word to describe this expensive affliction, called “Jang-bi-byung.: It translates into “equipment-itis.”

I’m sure that such an insatiable desire for the latest and greatest gear isn’t limited only to Koreans, but I’d wager it affects a lot more of us than in most golfing countries.

And our scope of search isn’t limited only to this side of the world either.

Ballistic Golf MB proto iron heads – bullets and ball not included.

Meet Ballistic Golf, a fledgling golf brand hailing out of Iowa. And if the initial reactions from my friends are any indication, it may well be the next “it” brand for many Korean golfers.

Love at first sight

Back in mid-December, I was scouring the internet, as usual, looking for that special something when I first came across the Ballistic Forged MB irons.

I was immediately won over by the universal language of the classic muscleback—the name and logo instantly resonated with me.

I’d like to say I did the due diligence and carefully weighed the pros and cons of owning these beauties. But the truth is, I didn’t.

Luckily, the price of the clubs was lower than initially expected, thanks to the DTC (direct-to-consumer) model, and I soon became a proud owner of a set of MB irons (5-PW) and two bad-ass looking Covert wedges (52, 56).

After arranging for the clubheads to be delivered to Korea, I reached out to chat with Kyle Carpenter, founder and CEO of Ballistic.

Here’s what he had to say about the brand

“Ballistic Golf launched in July 2019, but I’ve been focused on the idea of starting the company for quite a while. The name was chosen because one definition of ballistic is ‘of or relating to the science of the motion of projectiles in flight.’ And that fits golf so perfectly. My main goal was to design clubs that golfers could perform with, while also keeping a classic look and feel to them.

“Confidence is a major key to good play on the golf course. At Ballistic Golf, we feel that our clubs radiate that feeling right from when you open the package to when you take your first swings. Players irons require confidence and consistency to play well with them, and having irons with a sleek minimalist design and surprisingly good feel on slight mishits, gives you that confidence.

“Wage War on Par’ is our mantra. We really wanted people to have the feeling that they can go out and kick par’s ass. So we made a club that looks and feels great and build on the confidence it gives you to execute the shots you know in your mind that you can hit.”

The hard pelican case and the Ballistic Golf dog tag were a great touch!

A match made in fitting heaven

Long before they arrived, I was snooping around various fitting shops in anticipation, looking through the many options of shafts. My goal was to find shafts that would best suit my game, while at the same time, elicit oohs and aahs from those who have yet to discover the brand.

After an in-depth fitting session with Jay Chung, a master club fitter with over 20 years’ experience, I had decided on Fujikura MCI graphite shafts. I was looking to try something lighter than my usual True Temper Dynamic Gold steel shafts, as I have struggled with elbow pain over the summer.

Jay Chung, master fitter at Fujikura center in Gangnam, Seoul.

During the club-making process, the first thing I noticed was how meticulous he was in preparation. After measuring every component from clubhead, to shaft, and grip, he proceeded to walk me through various factors and that can affect a club from performing at its optimum. He left nothing to chance and wrote everything down on a spec sheet that would be saved on file for my future fittings.

In the end, I was holding one of the finest-looking set of clubs I have ever owned.

The first Ballistic Golf irons in Korea—mission accomplished!

Ballistic performance

My efforts were rewarded with the appropriate amount of praise from friends and begrudging envy from the Joneses. But now it was time to put these beauties to the test.

The clean club head looks great at address, checking all the requisite boxes for a traditional muscle-back blade. Made from forged 1020 carbon steel, the heads are compact with a thin top line and sole. The progressive blade length is optimized throughout the set, and the reduced offset and classic loft make these clubs a true player’s iron.

I am by no means a superb ballstriker, but it wasn’t difficult to find the sweet spot with the new irons. Even for off-center strikes, the ball traveled farther than expected with immediate feedback. The MCI 80 stiff graphite shaft complimented the head and helped to absorb the vibrations from off-center hits.

7-irons comparison on indoor screen golf simulator

The numbers from the first simulator trials were quite comparable to my current gamer (Yonex N1MB with Matrix Ozik 70R graphite shaft), which is fitted with regular flex shafts a 1/2 inch longer.

The look and feel of any club are subjective, but the Ballistic irons felt great in my hands. At impact, it felt as if the ball stayed a fraction longer on the face, then rocket off with a soft yet firm feel and a pleasing sound.

I later compared both clubs on a TrackMan, and although I don’t have the pictures, the launch numbers and overall distance were much closer to my gamer. I attributed the improved performance to becoming more familiar with the new irons and shafts.

The Covert wedges performed as well as they looked. The cast head is made from 8620 carbon steel and framed the ball squarely at address. The sole design is designed for a variety of shot-making options around the green, and the laser-etched micro-grooves reminded me of Cleveland’s RTX-4 wedge.

The Patriot wedge has the same specs as the black Covert wedge and features a satin finish with an American flag etched on the back of the head.

Specs and price

So far, the design and presentation of the clubs were more than enough to draw the attention of everyone who saw them. The pairing of the club heads with the graphite MCI shafts continue to produce good numbers, and I can see them being in my bag for the start of the season.

The best feature aside from the eye-catching design was the price. A set of MB proto irons (4-PW) with KBS Tour steel shafts and Golf Pride Tour Velvet grips is priced at $749, and each wedge is available at $109.

When I inquired about his plans to add new club models, Kyle said he will focus only on the MB irons and the two types of wedges (RH only) for the time being; to keep things simple and traditional.

For more information, visit Ballistic.golf

Your Reaction?
  • 123
  • LEGIT7
  • WOW11
  • LOL7
  • IDHT3
  • FLOP6
  • OB5
  • SHANK9

Continue Reading

Equipment

Today from the Forums: “Best sand-specific wedge?”

Published

on

Today from the Forums, we take a look at a discussion on sand-specific wedges. Alpha3 is on the hunt for a forgiving wedge for bunker play, and our members have been talking about what they have found to be the most effective wedges from the sand.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • harricli: “I play mostly desert golf with terrible sand; however, I have an old 64 degree sm5 Vokey that is about as automatic as possible out of a bunker. It goes in the bag if I’m playing anywhere that has real bunkers.”
  • nphillips0613: “Hi-Toe is great out of sand. I haven’t tried it but look into the Bigfoot hi Toe. 15° of bounce has to make it easier to get out of sand.”
  • Lepatrique: “The best place to start is a high bounce wedge. They tend to be much more forgiving from most bunkers, for most players. Low bounce wedges are great if you’re trying to nip a high shot off of a firm lie in the fairway, but tend to dig a bit in bunkers. I would recommend finding a couple high bounce wedges and seeing what you like the look/feel of best.”
  • uglande: “Depends on conditions. I like a low bounce, high loft club for firm sand (mostly what I play) and have a Vokey 62 in an M grind (8 bounce) for that. But for versatility, I would say take more bounce and keep loft high — like a 56-58 degree D grind Vokey (12 degrees bounce). That’s a great club from bunkers and plenty of bounce for full shots as well.”
  • BCULAW: “K Grind was easiest for me out of the sand. I used a little different technique with it, where, instead of splashing the ball out, I would turn the leading edge down a little almost like a chip. Ball came out fluffy and soft. Easy as pie.”

Entire Thread: “Best sand-specific wedge?”

Your Reaction?
  • 7
  • LEGIT3
  • WOW1
  • LOL1
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK0

Continue Reading

WITB

Facebook

Trending