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TaylorMade 2017 M2 Fairway Woods and Hybrids: What you need to know

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TaylorMade’s M2 line of golf equipment is designed to help golfers increase distance and accuracy by offering more forgiveness, at least when compared to TaylorMade’s M1 line, which targets better golfers. Generally speaking, the M2 drivers, fairways woods and hybrids have larger club heads and lower profiles to help golfers hit higher, longer shots.

Compared to the previous line of M2 fairway woods and hybrids, the new M2 models offer more forgiveness, better sound and improved feel. Learn more about how TaylorMade designed its new M2 fairway woods and hybrids below, and join the discussion of the clubs in our forums.

M2 Fairway Woods

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Like the M2 drivers, the M2 fairway woods have a lighter 6-layer carbon fiber crown that helps lower the center of gravity (CG) of the club heads to make them high-launching and more forgiving. Unlike the drivers, however, TaylorMade’s new M2 fairway woods have a recess, or a “step” between the white, steel portion used on the front of the crown and the black carbon fiber used on the rest of the crown. The new geometry also lowers the CG of the fairway woods.

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The M2 fairway woods also mark the first time TaylorMade is putting its Inverted Cone Technology (ICT) in a fairway wood. The technology, which serves to spread out the sweet spot of a club, has been commonly used in TaylorMade driver and iron designs, but never in a fairway wood.

“Inverted Cone” club faces are thicker in the center and get progressively thinner around the perimeter of the club face. The thicker center portion allows COR (coefficient of restitution, a measure of spring-like effect) to remain at the USGA’s legal limit in the center of the club face, and maintains COR on the outer portions of the face, thus raising ball speeds on off-center hits.

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The soles of the M2 fairway woods are designed with TaylorMade’s “Geocoustic” theme, as seen throughout the M2 metal wood line. It uses geometry to tune the sound of the club head at impact, moving weight structures from inside the club head to the outside where they can improve CG location while also managing vibrations from impact.

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The soles of the M2 fairway woods also have a Speed Pocket, a slot in the sole that’s longer and more flexible than its predecessors. It increases forgiveness across the club face, according to the company. As in the 2016 M2 fairway woods, the hosels of the clubs are also “fluted” to remove weight from the top of the clubs, ultimately lowering CG and dampening vibrations up the shaft.

The M2 fairway woods will be offered in 3 (15 degrees), 3HL (16.5 degrees), 5 (18 degrees), 5HL (21 degrees) and 7HL (24 degrees) options and will be available on Jan. 27 for $249 each.

M2 Tour Fairway Woods

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Despite their smaller club head size (about 156 cubic centimeters), the club heads of the M2 Tour fairway woods use all the same technologies as the standard M2 fairway woods. Their compact design can improve versatility and reduce turf interaction for better players, however, while providing the more compact look that many golfers prefer.

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The M2 Tour (left) and M2 fairway woods.

It’s expected that the M2 Tour fairway woods will produce all the ball speed golfers have come to expect from M2 fairway woods, while producing slightly more spin because of their deeper club faces to help better players more easily manipulate trajectory.

The M2 Tour fairway woods ($299.99) will be available Jan. 27, 2017 in lofts of 15 and 16.5 degrees. Mitsubishi Rayon’s Kuro Kage Silver TiNi 70 (R, S X) will be the stock shaft.

M2 Hybrids

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The M2 hybrids have the same recess or “step” seen in the M2 fairway woods. And golfers who enjoy the black-and-white look of TaylorMade’s driver and fairway wood crowns will also be happy to see a new black-and-white paint scheme its added to the M2 hybrids.

The soles of the M2 hybrids have a Speed Pocket that TaylorMade says is “more active” compared to its predecessors. It’s larger, and is said to transfer more energy to the golf ball on off-center hits. The hosel of the new hybrids are also fluted, but shorter than their predecessor to help lower the CG of the club heads.

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Although the M2 hybrid heads are still larger and longer from front to back than the M1 hybrids, which makes them play more like mini fairway woods, the 2017 models are slightly smaller than the 2016 M2 hybrids. They also have more rounded soles for improved turf interaction.

TaylorMade’s M2 Rescue clubs will be offered in 3 (19 degrees), 4 (22 degrees), 5 (25 degrees) and 6 (28 degrees) options, and will be available for $199.99 apiece starting on Jan. 27.

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  1. Mr Poopoo

    Dec 10, 2016 at 4:01 pm

    M2 Tour = RBZ 3.0

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Equipment

L.A.B. Golf now offers DF 2.1 putter with Electroless Nickel finish

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When you have an award-winning product, you don’t need overhaul it.

Instead, from time to time, you just need to give it a little tweak, and in the case of L.A.B. Golf’s DF 2.1—featuring lie angle balanced technology—that means offering a new highly durable nickel finish.

This isn’t the first time the team at L.A.B. Golf has changed a few things up with the DF 2.1. Just this May, on “Star Wars day” May 4th (because May 4th also kinda sounds like “May the force… be with you”) they released a hyper-limited 5 putter series featuring Start Wars graphics.

The new nickel finish on the L.A.B. DF2.1 is applied using Electroless Nickel Plating which is applied in a nickel bath through a chemical reaction. This reaction doesn’t require the traditional electric current for the plating process and it deposits a uniform layer of nickel onto the surface of the putter.

This nickel plating makes the finish on the putter almost impossible to scratch, and based on the properties of pure nickel, it isn’t affected by moisture.

Price, Specs, and Availability

The L.A.B. Golf DF 2.1 is available now with a base price of $425, with the new nickel plating being offered for an additional $30.

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TaylorMade P Series irons: Talking tour integration

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Now that the cat has been let out of the bag on the new 2020 TaylorMade P Series irons, I wanted to get some intel on how these new sticks will start to infiltrate the major tours and what that might look like.

TaylorMade’s Adrian Rietveld is one of the individuals that players like Rory, Rahm, and a number of the European staff trust to transition into new product.

I had a chance to chat with him this week on all things P Series, and this is what he had to say.

JW: In a general sense, what is the process for you when integrating a new product on Tour?

AR: I never like to do [more than] one product at a time, unless I’m at the Kingdom or off-site. On tour, it’s essential the focus stays in a bubble and we deal with one thing at a time. We typically will speak before any testing is done and I’ll get a sense from them what is looking to be gained or if there are any glaring issues.

The main place to start is going apples-to-apples spec-wise—old product vs new product. At that point we can see what the new product is offering, i.e. where it’s good and also identify what we need to do to get dialed across the board.

JW: Of the main Tour staff, who is testing now, and who will be testing after the season is over?

AR: Can’t answer exactly who is currently testing because all players test at different times, but I know our U.S. and European core staff players all have sets including non-staff players that also have our equipment in play.

The cool thing is the players who have had the time to test put them in play quickly which is a good sign.

JW: Rory put the P7MB in play quickly. What did he respond to on the P7MB that encouraged the switch?

AR: He did, but by the time, he got them he had been testing with us for a good while. When he got the set he has now, he was already quite familiar with them, so the transition was easy. This iron was designed with a lot of his input (as well as DJ) and both players had very nuanced but similar preferences, so it’s safe to say he was comfortable with them when they came outta the box.

It’s not a huge switch from his 730’s. He liked that he picked up marginal improvements across the board and was particularly pleased of the simplicity of the set—especially in the longer irons with less offset.

JW: What improvements are you seeing so far vs old models?

AR: For MB, using Charley Hull as an example, the 730 for her seemed to turn over a bit and was a bit less forgiving. With the 7MB, she neutralized her ball flight all while keeping her spec identical to her old set.

In the MC the long irons seem to launch a touch higher with a fraction more speed. Every player who has tested has made the switch, and that’s with no pressure to do so. We are patient when players irons hit in regards to player switches. I believe in the next 6-9 months you will see a ton of MC’s in bags, whether its staff or non-staff.

JW: Do you think you will see more combo sets than before?

AR: To be honest most setups these days are combo sets in some way shape or form. What I think we will see are players having the P7MB play further down into the set. For example, the player that was 4, 5, 6 750 and 7-P in 730 will now start to have the MB in the 5 and 6. That little addition of forgiveness will give players enough confidence and performance to make them comfortable.

JW: Using Rahm as an example, what is his process when he is getting into a new product?

AR: He spends a lot of time at The Kingdom and does any major switching there. He’s not a player who tends to tinker at a tournament site. As with most of our staff, his process is about making sure any switch in the bag is a step forward in performance. Since he lives in Arizona, getting to Keith and me in Carlsbad isn’t a long trip and that gives us ample quiet time to focus, test, and experiment.

*according to TaylorMade, eight sets P Series irons have been built for players on the European Tour with seven going into play immediately.

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Best tips for shopping for used golf clubs

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We’re in the middle of the golf season, and there is still lots of time left to lower your handicap, post a personal best score, and have some more fun along the way—but it might require some news clubs to get there. The best part is today, new doesn’t have to mean brand new—it can just be “new” to you.

Before spending any money shopping for used golf clubs, it’s important to pay close attention to a number of small details to save you time—and prevent you from having to spend more money down the road to correct for purchasing mistakes.

Here is our how-to guide to shop for used clubs

Shop the big sellers: Unless you are buying locally and have the opportunity to inspect clubs and know their source, the safest and easiest way to shop is from the big online sellers that inspect and verify the clubs they sell are legit.

Although thanks to a very concerted effort by OEMs to mostly eliminate counterfeit gear, it can still find its way into the marketplace and big sellers help stop the spread and prevent you from wasting your money. Also, most of the big sellers use photos of the actual clubs you are buying – not representative photos so you know exactly what you are getting.
**(We also have a great Buy/Sell/Trade board here on GolfWRX too)**

The telltale signs of counterfeit clubs are

  • Badge and brand colors slightly off
  • Poorly installed shaft bands (the stickers on steel shafts)
  • Awful smelling grips – they can feel thin and smell like very cheap rubber or solvents
  • Club weight seems very off – for irons and wedges they might feel extremely light and for drivers and woods they can feel a lot heavier because of the extremely poor quality graphite shafts being used.

Confirm specs: You don’t need to have a shop worth of tools to quickly and easily take some simple measurements to make sure you and getting clubs that match the right spec you are looking for, although a very specific tool is needed to check lies and lofts.

Specs you can check without tools – irons and wedges

  • Lengths: If lengths arent stated and you are buying in person, just simply bring a few of your own clubs to compare.
  • Grips: A quick check that all of the grips match for size and style can save you money, and make sure they feel good when you go to use them. Don’t forget though, grips are an easy and affordable way to make used clubs feel new again.
  • Matching shafts: A quick visual inspection to make sure the shafts match up will make sure you are getting what you pay for. Along that same line, checking to also make sure the ferrules match will show whether any club in the set was potentially repaired at some point.

Shopping for used clubs can feel like a treasure hunt and is a lot of fun—it’s also a great way to save money on equipment. Just be sure to not get caught up in what might seem like a deal too good to be true and take your time when evaluating what you are buying.

Happy (used golf club) shopping!

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