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TaylorMade 2017 M1 Fairway Woods and Hybrids: What you need to know

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With its 2017 M1 line, TaylorMade makes its fairway woods even more adjustable and forgiving, while giving its hybrids a new level adjustability. Here’s what you need to know about both offerings.

M1 Fairway Woods

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The M1 fairway woods have a smaller footprint and more compact appearance at address than TaylorMade’s new M2 fairway woods. Most better players will prefer the look of the M1 fairways at address, as well as their center of gravity (CG) location, which is closer to the face to create a lower, more workable trajectory.

Sticking to its M name — which stands for multi-material — TaylorMade’s M1 fairway woods are made from multiple materials, including 450 stainless steel bodies, Ni-Co C300 club faces and thinner, six-layer carbon composite crowns.

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The familiar sliding-track system on the M1 fairway woods allows center of gravity (CG) to be adjusted with a 25-gram tungsten weight that tweaks draw and fade bias. Compared to its predecessor, the track has been shifted more rearward, making room for what TaylorMade calls a “Speed Pocket” behind the face. The design change pushed the overall CG of the clubs rearward, helping raise launch angle and forgiveness. The Speed Pocket also plays a role in increasing ball speed on off-center strikes.

While TaylorMade admits that the M1 is not its longest-flying fairway wood (that title belongs to the new M2), the distance gap between the two fairway woods has closed. The M1 has increased ball speeds by an average of 1 mph when compared to the 2016 M1 fairway woods, TaylorMade says.

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Like past models, the 2017 M1 fairway woods are adjustable, and their new loft sleeves (made from aluminum) have 12 different loft settings, allowing golfers to adjust loft +/- 2 degrees from printed lofts and adjust lie angle.

To improve turf interaction, the soles of the M1 fairway woods have been recessed in the rear portion, helping reduce drag through impact. This will allow the club to exit quicker from the grass and prevent digging. Our early testing results show that the new sole design can really help on shots from tight lies.

The new M1 fairway woods, like the new M1 drivers, use a new FF2FF manufacturing process that reduces crown weight to lower the CG of the club head and create a slightly higher launch angle. Compared to the M2 fairway woods, the M1 fairway woods will continue to produce slightly more spin, according to the company.

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The M1 fairway woods will be available on Jan. 27, 2017 for $299.99 in 15 (3-wood), 17 (3HL), and 19 (5-wood) degrees, each coming stock with Mitsubishi Rayon’s Kuro Kage Silver TiNi fairway wood shafts. There are also 30 shafts available at no upcharge, and stock clubs will be outfitted with Lamkin UTx grips.

M1 Hybrids

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Like the M1 fairway woods, the M1 hybrids use a 4-degree aluminum Loft Sleeve to allow golfers to tweak loft, lie and face angle.

TaylorMade’s 2017 M1 hybrids introduce a new weight-track system on sole, which employs a 27-gram tungsten weight to enable golfers to give the clubs more draw and fade bias, if needed.

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Like the M1 fairway woods, there is also a Speed Pocket behind the face of the hybrids, helping increase ball speeds on off-center hits. The Speed Pocket is designed to help the face flex more on toe and heel strikes, helping mishits fly more like good shots.

Designed with input from TaylorMade staffers, the top rail and overall size of the hybrids is closer to that of a driving iron than what you’d expect from a typical hybrid. This allows players to better dial-in trajectories, making the clubs more versatile as well.

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The M1 rescues clubs come in 2 (17 degrees), 3 (19 degrees), 4 (21 degrees) and 5 (24 degrees) models, and will be available on January 27 for $249 each.

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5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. Mr Poopoo

    Dec 8, 2016 at 2:50 am

    I see TM still has some of the old Adams Golf engineers still on staff doing the hybrids.

    • Jack

      Dec 9, 2016 at 3:28 am

      Yeah that bottom edge looks like the tight lies clubs. Plus they bought them just to get the speed slot patent anyway. I’m sure they are good. Honestly fairway woods are now better than ever, with just minor tweaks every year.

      I’m not sure if this years’ clubs are better than the last though. Some of the testing and feedback has been kinda soso.

  2. DJ

    Dec 7, 2016 at 6:40 pm

    they look like game improvement clubs.

  3. Bob Chipeska

    Dec 7, 2016 at 12:13 pm

    The only thing I need to know is when they plan on releasing the M1 v3.0, so I can pick one of these up at $150.

  4. Leon

    Dec 7, 2016 at 10:33 am

    Cheapmade

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Equipment

Forum Thread of the Day: “Lighter shaft for dealing with joint tiredness?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from Zigzog, who is a long-time golfer searching for the best methods for dealing with joint tiredness and aching elbow pain during/following his rounds. Zigzog has been considering moving to a lighter shaft to reduce the pain, and our members have been sharing their tips and tricks on the subject.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • Galanga: “Passenger in the same boat. I believe lighter weight and shock absorption is the ticket — many stories to of it working on this site. I second the prior poster’s suggestion to not go down in weight too quickly. For me, the graphite shaft selection effort has been a rabbit hole. Probably best to go to a fitter w lots of options and expertise.”
  • KensingtonPark: “I am in a similar position as you. I am experimenting with tour weighted graphite shafts in my irons. It definitely seems to help, as vibration more than weight is the source of my joint fatigue. That and a lack of stretching…”
  • rwc356: “I’ve been playing 50+ years and started feeling my age about 10 years ago. While I never had a plus handicap, I did play to a single digit handicap until my early 50’s. Arthritis and other health issue started creating havoc with my game, and I made the transition to graphite and more forgiving clubs. I was afraid to leave what I knew, and so I converted a few clubs (5 iron and 7 iron) to graphite and tried them for a number of rounds. It wasn’t long before I realized that I could play them as well as steel shafts and so I added the rest of short irons. Been playing 3 seasons with graphite and not sure I could go back. I love old blades and have a number of sets which I sneak back to every so often – result is always the same, shaft too heavy and body too sore. Good luck with finding a solution that fits your game best.”
  • jjfcpa: “I’m 72 years old and didn’t start playing golf till I was 67, so I have no memory of what it was like to play steel shafts or have a fast swing speed. I find that playing lighter shafts (in my case graphite) to be much easier on the joints. I also found that doing strength training at the gym doing the offseason really makes it much easier to maintain your performance level during the golf season.”

Entire Thread: “Lighter shaft for dealing with joint tiredness?”

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Whats in the Bag

Tyrrell Hatton’s winning WITB: 2019 Turkish Airlines Open

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Driver: Ping G410 Plus (9 degrees set at 8.4)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana RF 60-TX

Fairway wood: TaylorMade M6 HL (16.5 degrees, bent to 15.7)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD TP 7X

Fairway wood: Ping G410 (20.5 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD TP 8X

Irons: Ping i210 (4-PW)
Shafts: Nippon Modus3 Tour 120 X

Wedges: Ping Glide Forged (50 degrees), Titleist Vokey Design SM7 Raw (54-08M, 60-10S)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Putter: Ping Vault Oslo

Grips: Golf Pride New Decade MCC

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

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Equipment

WRX Spotlight: Cobra King Forged TEC irons

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The skinny: As Ryan Barath first reported, the introduction of the newest Cobra King Forged TEC irons for 2020, it is taking speed and forgiveness to a whole new level.

Behind what appears to be an extremely traditional-looking muscleback iron hides a huge amount of technology designed to help players of all abilities, whether it be with a traditional variable-length set or with Cobra’s One Length set—more on that latter. The King Forged TEC irons are a hollow-body design that utilizes a thin face supported by what Cobra engineers call energizing foam microspheres, to both fine-tune acoustics (sound/feel) of the head, while also supporting the PWRSHELL Face for increased ball speeds, according to the company.

Our take on Cobra King Forged TEC irons

Not only do the new Cobra Forged TEC irons pass the eyeball test, but the engineers at Cobra have also developed a club with excellent performance.

In our own testing, the clubs had several features which really stood out

Performance out of the rough: with the low tungsten insert, the low center of gravity performs outstanding from thick lies.

Face consistency: with other similar clubs, our experience is that perfectly struck shots tend to “fly”, sometimes flying considerably longer. With the Forged Tec, the face is incredibly consistent. Off-center hits, particularly off the toe, fly remarkably well.

Chipping: with a clean look, and little offset, one of the additional nuances of these clubs is how good they are to chip (pitch) with.

When ordering the set, keep in mind that there is only a two-degree difference between the 5 (23 degrees) and 4-iron (21 degrees). This lead to some uneven gapping and as a result, we discarded the 4-iron and instead decided to bend the 5-iron, one degree strong.

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