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Review: Srixon Z965, Z765 and Z565 irons

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Pros: Great distance, impressive looks and feel. The Z965, Z765 and Z565 irons can hang with any iron in their respective classes, and blend well in a mixed set. Unique Tour V.T. Soles improve turf interaction.

Cons: The differences between Srixon’s Z-65 and Z-45 iron models are subtle.

Who they’re for: Anyone can play Srixon’s Z965, Z765 and Z565 irons, buy they’ll perform best for low-to-mid handicappers.

The Review

When you think of popular irons and irons played on the PGA Tour, Srixon may actually be one of the last to come to mind. Surely you’d lead with Callaway, Ping, TaylorMade and Titleist, then think of more exotic irons like Mizuno or PXG. Just because they’re under the radar, however, doesn’t mean Srixon doesn’t make some of the best all-around irons in golf.

Srixon’s no-frills approach to iron-making is refreshing in today’s golf equipment climate. The company forges its irons from 1020 carbon steel, and offers three distinct models than can please anyone from traditionalists (Z965) to forged cavity-back enthusiasts (Z765) to distance- or forgiveness-seeking crowds (Z565). Each offers the premium, detail-oriented design serious golfers desire without breaking the $1100 barrier for an eight-piece, steel-shafted set.

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Their biggest flaw? Srixon’s Z965, Z765 and Z565 irons are very similar to the Z945, Z745 and Z545 irons they replace. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, as the Z-45 series was well regarded in golf-equipment circles for its looks, feel and performance. The design of the Z-65 series falls into the bucket of “don’t mess with success,” but Srixon did make a few notable changes.

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Srixon’s Tour V.T. Sole in a Z765 iron.

In terms of upgrades, each of this year’s Z-65 irons has Srixon’s new Tour V.T. Sole, which have a V shape to reduce turf interaction at impact, thereby improving energy transfer and consistency — especially on shots where golfers catch the grass before the ball. To further enhance the benefits of the Tour V.T. Soless, the company removed surface area around the heel and toe sections, and relief was added to backside of the sole as well.

It should be noted that because the Z965 (muscle backs), Z765 (cavity backs) and Z565 irons (game-improvement irons) each have different head shapes and sole widths, and the sole geometries are slightly different for each iron.

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Srixon also made the grooves in all of the irons 5 percent larger, increasing ball friction at impact to create more consistent launch and spin characteristics, especially in wet conditions. Let’s take a more in-depth look at each iron to find out which option may be right for you and your game.

Z565 Irons

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While labeled game-improvement irons, the Z565s are decidedly smaller, and have thinner top lines and much less offset than what golfers might expect in the category. And they’re forged, too. It makes you wonder why they’re tagged as “game-improvement” at all… until you hit them on a launch monitor and uncover their freakish performance.

The Z565 irons have forged, 1020 carbon steel bodies, but also employ thin, SUP10 face inserts that allows their club faces to flex more at impact. You’ll also notice a hollow cavity that sits behind the club face that isn’t used in the design of the Z765 or Z965 irons. The construction improves forgiveness and ball speed, and raises launch angle.

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Surprisingly, you won’t notice much of a feel difference between the Z565 and the company’s smaller irons. Yes, the sound is slightly more hollow and higher-pitched, but it’s subtle. These are forged irons, and despite their thin club faces they deliver on forged feel — at least among game-improvement irons.

Again though, these irons aren’t just for double-digit handicappers. It’s quite common to find Z565 long and mid irons paired with either the company’s Z765 or Z965 irons in the bags of professional golfers and better golfers around the globe.

Let’s say you’re a 7-15 handicapper. There’s a good chance the Z565’s will satisfy your needs in terms of looks, sound and performance. As for any low handicappers or even Tour players out there, the Z565 irons can help you hit a few more par 5s in two, filling in distance or performance gaps at the lower end of your iron set.

Z765 or Z965? A tough call

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Low handicappers have a difficult decision to make between Srixon’s Z765 and Z965 irons. The Z965’s are musclebacks that are slightly more “workable,” as blade-lovers like to say. That’s another way of relaying that they’re smaller-sized irons that spin slightly more. Both irons, though, have similar profiles with little offset and thin top lines. Both also use Srixon’s Tour V.T. Soles, and utilize a new heat treatment to make the irons more durable.

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A Srixon Z965 iron at address

For cavity-back players, the Z965 blades won’t be much smaller or more intimidating than the Z765 irons. For blade players, the Z765 won’t look clunky or have too much offset. Low, single-digit handicappers could really go either way, or create a brag-worthy mixed set. If you have the game, you can’t choose wrong. But of course, a proper fitting will help you make the best decision… and with that, we’re on to the numbers.

The Numbers

To test the performance of the Z965, Z765 and the Z565 irons, we took all three models to The Launch Pad at Carl’s Golfland in Bloomfield Hills, Mich., where we tested Srixon’s new irons on Trackman with premium golf balls. We had two scratch players hit the 4, 7 and PW from each set, and the irons were built with stock lofts, lies, lengths, and Nippon’s Modus3 Tour 120X shafts.

SrixonZ654irons

All three 4 irons measured 38.5 inches in length and had 60.5-degree lie angles. The shafts were also the same, Nippon’s Modus3 Tour 120X, as were the grips.

SrixonZ657iron

All three 7 irons measured 37 inches in length and had 62-degree lie angles. The shafts were also the same, Nippon’s Modus3 Tour 120X, as were the grips.

SrixonZ65PitchWedge

All three 7 irons measured 35.5 inches in length and had 63.5-degree lie angles. The shafts were also the same, Nippon’s Modus3 Tour 120X, as were the grips.

It’s clear after testing that each of the irons offer distinct performance benefits, so you’ll certainly need to identify the strengths and weaknesses of your game to make the best decision. Overall, we found that the flight produced by the Z965, Z765 and Z565 irons is “flatter,” or more boring than one could expect from other lines of irons on the market, making them less likely than others to balloon.

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In our test, the numbers show that Player 2, who has a slightly more shallow and slower swing speed, excelled more with the Z765 irons. Player 2, on the other hand, with a steeper and more aggressive move at the ball, found the blade irons to produce a tighter dispersion.

Both players relayed that the sole allowed them to be confident at impact, knowing that the club wouldn’t dig. The only concern is that “flippers,” or those with an early release, could have issues with the V-shaped sole due to its mass.

Notes from the numbers

  • The Z565 irons produced the most ball speed, highest launch angles, overall height and the least amount of spin almost across the board.
  • The Z965 irons generated the least amount of distance, ball speed and the most spin almost across the board.
  • Player 2 hit the Z765 4-iron and 7-iron longer than the same Z565 clubs by 1.6 yards and 4.5 yards, respectively.
  • Both players saw significant distance increases with the Z565 pitching wedge.

The Takeaway

Srixon’s new Z-65 iron series is everything you’d expect from the company after its successful and well-regarded release of its Z-45 series irons. The changes between old and new are minimal, however, so if you already have a set of Z-45 irons there’s little reason to upgrade.

That being said, if you’re in the market for new irons, know that Srixon’s Z965, Z765 and Z565 irons can hang with any iron in their respective categories. They deliver a blend of exceptional distance, impressive forgiveness and the tour-quality looks and sound better players demand. Regardless of what you pay, you’d be hard pressed to find a set of better premium, forged irons — especially if the Tour V.T. Soles are a match for your game.

See more photos, and what GolfWRX members are saying about the irons in our forums.

[wrx_retail_links productid=”106″]

[wrx_retail_links productid=”108″]

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27 Comments

27 Comments

  1. Tyler

    Apr 7, 2017 at 11:52 am

    I wanted to mix a set of 565’s with 765’s but after hitting the short irons I just decided to go with a complete set of 565’s.

    I love them. I don’t have as much time to play and practice but you would never know it. Feel is great. Launch and distance was just what i was looking for.

    Great clubs. I like the fact that they fly below the radar of the Bigger Companies.

  2. Drew

    Jan 9, 2017 at 11:17 pm

    I have hit the Z565 7 iron with the stock Nippon NS Pro 980 stiff steel shaft on the LM at my local Edwin Watts. I was shocked, at first, that the Z565’s are as crazy long as the review test result. When I went home, I looked up the lofts and it became clear why I was hitting a forged 7 iron as long as my Callaway X-Hot 7 iron. The lofts are very strong on the Callaway’s, and the Srixon’s have very similar strong lofts. I imagine the Nippon shaft is a better fit for my swing, which explains some of the carry distance. I am definitely going to get a set of Z565’s when I find a good used set on the market. The $1000.00 price tag is the only “down side” I can see for the Srixon iron set.

  3. Tom Duckworth

    Dec 1, 2016 at 9:36 pm

    Absolutely beautiful clubs. I just wonder how much the Nippon shafts have to do with the flatter ball flight. That is kind of in the DNA of these shafts
    Not saying anything against the shafts I like them I have Nippon Modus 3 105s in my FG Tour V2s.
    The testers got some big numbers with them. I’m looking forward to trying them.
    It’s hard to find them however.
    We have a club fitter here in KC that sells Miura, Epon, Ben Hogans, PXG and other high end clubs. I think it says something about Srixon that they carry them as well.

  4. Tom

    Oct 17, 2016 at 4:44 pm

    Nice to see the stats that beat MP series.

  5. Mark

    Sep 20, 2016 at 9:40 pm

    Chuffing V sole again. And 156 with a wedge? Dream On…..cue Aerosmith!

  6. Jack

    Sep 20, 2016 at 3:51 am

    I love how these scratch players hit it as far as Dustin Johnson.

    • BoomCannon

      Sep 20, 2016 at 10:26 am

      He’s a short knocker on these forums.

    • carlsheen

      Sep 20, 2016 at 3:03 pm

      And?

    • Jim

      Sep 23, 2016 at 12:37 am

      You’d be surprised. We are on a regular basis. New Epon 703 – yeah, strong loft, but so well engineered w undercut channel cavity, low COG so produces perfect 8 iron launch & flight.

      3 hcp, 5’10, athletic college Hockey player & golfer on Trackman: 92mph, 36.75″ Epon 703 8 iron with 6.5 Proj X 18° launch 135 ball speed 5500 rpm (all avg) 6 hits – all over 200 carry. 208 longest…

  7. Tyler

    Sep 19, 2016 at 5:02 pm

    From my personal experience with these irons (745), I feel that the sound of these irons are sub par. Hitting multiple manufactures golf balls, they seemed to have a real hollow click. Now for me personally since sound and feel go hand and hand, the perception is that they were cheap despite the looks. I compared them side by side with Mizuno irons (MP54, H5) and there was a noticeable difference in feel sound and performance all going to Mizuno….and trust me I WANTED to like these iron, a lot !

  8. Dansrixon

    Sep 19, 2016 at 4:56 pm

    “When you think of popular irons and irons played on the PGA Tour, Srixon may actually be one of the last to come to mind. Surely you’d lead with Callaway, Ping, TaylorMade and Titleist, then think of more exotic irons like Mizuno or PXG. Just because they’re under the radar, however, doesn’t mean Srixon doesn’t make some of the best all-around irons in golf.”

    If you don’t think about Srixon irons on the PGA Tour it is only because you are not paying attention. 6 wins this season, that is more than Mizuno and PXG combined. More than Ping as well. Srixon may be lacking in marketing but not in Tour validation. Interestingly, 4 of those wins had Srixon irons in the runner ups bag not to mention numerous other runner ups, like at the US open.

    I get Srixon being under the radar for marketing reasons but they are right behind the big three on tour, with a much smaller budget. Mizuno has not been relevant on the PGA Tour in a decade. Srixon has always struggled with the marketing side of the game, but Tour validation is stronger than ever. And that is just talking about the irons…not even talking golf balls.

    • Justin

      Sep 20, 2016 at 11:44 am

      Sadly, marketing is all that seems to matter these days. The only thing Srixon spends marketing money on is golf balls. I wish more people knew how good they were, but they probably never will

      • carlsheen

        Sep 20, 2016 at 3:06 pm

        Agreed. Thanks for places like this that produce reviews for the game and not for the $$$. 10 years of letting the members say what is on their mind and supporting us is what it is all about.

  9. Dave C

    Sep 19, 2016 at 3:52 pm

    What does “will utilize a new heat treatment to make the irons more durable” mean for feel? Well this treatment solve the bag chatter observed in the 745 line?

  10. Nath

    Sep 19, 2016 at 3:44 pm

    Here here, half az melenials

  11. Ezra

    Sep 19, 2016 at 1:15 pm

    Hi there, lovely set! I can google the specs but it would be great to add them in the article IMO…

  12. ooffa

    Sep 19, 2016 at 12:17 pm

    Very nice advertisement

  13. foo

    Sep 19, 2016 at 11:33 am

    Every review is 5 out of 5 stars. Kind of defeats the purpose of having a rating at all.

  14. Warwick

    Sep 19, 2016 at 11:32 am

    Great article. Which smart ar*e checks lofts, lie and length? You just see how it goes for goodness sake.

    • Joshuaplaysgolf

      Sep 19, 2016 at 3:22 pm

      Because every company has tolerances for theses things. Titleist is +/-1* for loft. You should always have these things checked to make sure they are correct and fitted to your specifications. For the purpose of testing, it ensures it’s a consistent test with the labeled loft, lies, and lengths actually being the specifics the clubs are labeled as.

      • Scooter McGavin

        Sep 19, 2016 at 4:43 pm

        If Titleist’s tolerance is +/- 1* that’s news to me. Even when we had custom sets come in, they were frequently off by 2 or 3 degrees. We would rarely get a set that was good when it was received. Just to reinforce your point though about checking/adjusting them when you get them.

        • Jim

          Sep 21, 2016 at 1:21 am

          I CAN TOTALLY VOUCH FOR SHOOTER ON THIS! we check every custom OEM order, and 4/5 times a couple clubs need adjustment. Even all our ‘off the rack’ sales get double checked & tweaked.

          “Industry Spec’s +/- 2°”
          Nike’s were friggin terrible! crooked hosel bores, head weights off 4-5 grams…Mizuno hosels so loose the shafts need to be dimpled…

          Truth is, most of our ‘beloved’ major OEM’s pretty much suck compared to smaller batch very tight tolerance Japanese offerings. Srixon really made a big step with the ‘500’ series in – ’08/09? 506,s… Great clubs, Drivers were hot too. Did have a ‘quirky’ feel. Solid, but like someone else described a ‘click’ – you might expect more from a ball than the head…There’s a lot of great product over there! Bridgestone, Honma, Maruman, ON/OFF (formerly Diawa) – of course Epon & Miura….

          “Nice ad” (??) some folks are truly lost. If it ain’t TM (the largest producer of CRAP) or Titleist, it must be bogus

          • Tmoney

            Dec 19, 2016 at 12:28 pm

            I disagree. Mizuno has been right on when I’ve ordered them. I put them up there as one of the best. The only irons Ive sent back were Callaway’s for length adjustments that were off.

  15. TCJ

    Sep 19, 2016 at 11:06 am

    Any love for us lefties with the Z965?

  16. Topic_Monitor

    Sep 19, 2016 at 10:57 am

    Please respect fellow members and article authors. Thank You

  17. spelling b

    Sep 19, 2016 at 9:16 am

    MSmizzle agreed with you…now let’s work on your typing…

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Equipment

WRX Spotlight: Swag Golf proto putter

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Product: Swag Golf proto putter

Pitch: From Swag “Swag is the brand that isn’t scared to push the limits in a conservative sport that isn’t evolving to meet changing styles. We like to listen to music on the course, we want to be bold, we love having fun, we love golf, and we’re going to express that both on and off the course. We aren’t going to try to sell you on how great our proprietary materials are and we don’t need to rely on clever marketing to sell more. We’re a no BS company. What matters is that our putters feel good and in turn make you feel good when putting. We have some crazy ideas, we love to tinker, and we experiment on how to perfect everything we do. ”

Our Take on the Swag Golf Proto putter

Though relatively new, Swag Golf has been making a big splash in the industry for their high-end and striking headcovers and accessories. Perhaps less talked about when it comes to the company is their putters – something which I feel is likely to change after testing out their prototype rainbow finish flat-stick.

The putter is beautiful from whatever angle you look at – but especially at address. Extremely smooth lines, and with full-shaft offset, the blade’s shoulders and bumpers are flawlessly balanced to frame the ball and let the putter sit perfectly square. The single line alignment aid enhances the look and is positioned right in the center of the blade’s sweet spot, while the CNC milled flat-stick delivers perfectly smooth edges – noticeably on the neck for a sublime and soft profile.

With a head weight of 354g, the putter from Swag feels exceptional in your hands over the ball. Every detail matters when investing in a premium putter, and the sensation of the stable and firm feel of the flat-stick as well as there being no wavering of the head, makes the putter feel like an extension of your body when standing over a putt.

The sound and feel of the putter is an area where Swag has knocked it out of the park. With a fly milled face from 303 Stainless Steel, the flat-stick delivers an incredibly soft feel at impact.

No vibration is felt on impact, even on long-distance putts. It never feels like your hitting the ball but more caressing it, which is a pleasant sensation when putting from downtown. What you get in terms of sound at impact is a low, deep pitched note from a putter which rolls beautifully on its axis and produces no vibration on slight mis-hits.

To nitpick, the company’s “black mid pistol tackified kangaroo leather grip” took some getting used to. Initially, it took a little away from how impressive the flat-stick feels in your hands, but it gradually becomes more comfortable.

Overall performance-wise though, the putter from Swag provides everything you could hope for from a high-end putter. Exceptional feel at address, painfully attractive profile and precision at impact.

As of now, the company boasts self-confessed “putting nerd” Kevin Streelman as their PGA Tour ambassador. Streelman is currently gaming the brand’s Handsome Too proto, and after experiencing the Swag rainbow proto for myself, the highest compliment I can give is that I would be surprised if he (and PGA Tour newcomer Rhein Gibson) are still the only Tour pros to game one of the brand’s flat-sticks in 12 to 24 months time.

In terms of an Anser-style putter, Swag packs a hefty punch with their numerous offerings. While I personally love the eye-catching rainbow finish (which has been blasted to remove some of the boldness), I realize it’s not for everyone. However, the company has plenty more traditional finishes on their array of flat-sticks, which you can find on their website here.

Whatever finish you prefer your putters to come in though, it’s unlikely that any department of Swag’s flat-sticks will leave you disappointed.

 

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Equipment

New Mitsubishi Chemical ZF shaft in play at the Tour Championship

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Even after winning just a week ago, Justin Thomas has put a new MCA Diamana ZF-Series shaft into play for the Tour Championship and FedEx Cup Final this week at East Lake Golf Club. JT is using the 60g TX version in his 9.5-degree Titleist TS2 driver (see Thomas’ BMW Championship-winning WITB here).

MCA has confirmed the new shaft and given us some great information on why it is are adding this fourth profile to the Diamana line—something the company has never done before.

The new Diamana ZF has taken the easy loading bend profile from the BF-Series and tweaked it in certain spots along the length to further maximize the design and find greater performance for players across swing speed ranges.

“The result is a profile that makes ZF a little more explosive and easier to accelerate.” -Mark Gunther, Vice President of Sales and Marketing for MCA GOLF.

Like the other shafts in the Diamana Fourth Gen. Series, the Diamana ZF shafts owe their stiffness and stability to two unique technologies. First: the MCA-developed MR70 carbon fiber material, and the second: Boron fiber. MR70 is found in both the butt and tip sections of the shaft and is 20 percent stronger than conventional materials, with a 10 percent greater modulus (a measure of stiffness). These designs have additional strength thanks to Boron fiber in the tip section to create the exact EI curve desired.

When you compare the new ZF to Diamana BF-Series, the ZF-Series shafts are a slightly stronger profile and built to have increased stability in both the butt and tip sections. They feature a softer, more active middle for better energy transfer and clubhead acceleration.

A cool feature for those looking to get a bit more distance but are on the lower end of the swing speed spectrum: There will also be a 40-gram version of the ZF, which is the lightest shaft of the fourth generation Diamana family.

“We’re extremely happy to have a 40g option within Diamana™ ZF,” says Gunther. “This opens the performance benefits of these unique Mitsubishi Chemical materials to a whole new range of players who prefer to play an ultra-lightweight shaft.”

Mitsubishi Diamana ZF-Series Availability and Specs

Diamana ZF-Series will be available September, 13 2019 at MCA GOLF authorized retailers and dealers nationwide, with a suggested retail price of $400.

Weights and flexes

  • DIAMANA ZF-Series 40 (R2, R, S Flex)
  • DIAMANA ZF-Series 50 (R, S, TX Flex)
  • DIAMANA ZF-Series 60 (S, TX Flex)
  • DIAMANA ZF-Series 70 (S, TX Flex)
  • DIAMANA ZF-Series 80 (S, TX Flex)
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Equipment

Forum Thread of the Day: “Are 919 forged irons really that good?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from 9ironiscash who asked fellow members what they thought about Mizuno’s 919 forged ironsOur members dish out their experiences gaming the irons, with the majority of WRXers answering with a resounding yes to 9ironiscash’s original question.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire thread and have your say at the link below.

  • Gmack1973: “I think the 919 forged are great irons. I play to a handicap of 4 and think I’m not a bad ball striker. I had the tours 6-pw, and they were great but a bit unforgiving if you don’t get them out the middle. I now have 919 forged 4 – PW and couldnt be happier. They have the Nippon Modus 120 stiff shafts.”
  • Gofguy224: “They are great irons! Had them for about a month and I’ve already shot 3 of my lowest scores ever! Very forgiving and they feel buttery soft
  • chjyner: “The whole 919 range is probably the best on the market “
  • PowerCobra98: “I like them. Moved from Apex 19’s into 919 Forged. I’ll likely be looking at a set of MP20 HMB’s though.”

Entire Thread: “Are 919 forged irons really that good?”

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