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Mizuno JPX 900 drivers, fairway woods and hybrids

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In the golf equipment world, it’s rare for new releases and technologies to produce drastic distance gains in off-the-rack purchases, mostly due to limitations by the USGA. But where many new releases excel is in their increased adjustability, which allows golfers to fine-tune their clubs to fit their preferences and needs. That can create big distance gains, and a host of other benefits as well.

Mizuno is at the forefront of the custom-fitting movement with its JPX-900 drivers, fairway woods and hybrids, which were designed with focus on allowing golfers to optimize their swings and properly gap their clubs. That means golfers can get their games dialed in more than ever before.

Thanks to the added adjustability of the new JPX-900 driver, golfers can optimize spin rates, fine tune their visual preferences and help reduce their big miss. The new JPX-900 fairway woods have a central sliding weight that allows the clubs to perform as either a rocket launcher from the tee or high-ball hitting clubs that will stop shots abruptly on greens. The new JPX-900 hybrids have also undergone design changes to better fill a golfer’s yardage gaps, and look better, too.

Learn more about each of the new offerings below, and join the discussion about Mizuno’s JPX-900 clubs in our forums.

Mizuno JPX-900 driver

Mizuno_JPX_900_Driver

When designing the JPX-850 driver, which the JPX-900 driver is replacing, Mizuno “pulled out the stops,” says David Llewellyn, Mizuno’s Director of R&D. “We changed our attitude to make premium and aspirational drivers to match up with our irons.”

With a blue crown, adjustable center of gravity (CG) and adjustable hosels, Mizuno definitely broadened the scope of their drivers. Now, the company is expanding its technologies to cast an “even wider net,” according to Llewellyn, with a goal to “bring the most adjustable driver ever to the market.”

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To do that, Mizuno’s new JPX-900 driver offers an “Infinite Track,” which allows golfers to adjust center of gravity forward or rearward for trajectory and spin rate adjustments. It’s different from the familiar “Fast Track” of its predecessor, because there are no longer pre-determined spots on the track to put the weights; thus, the new track has infinite settings.

Also, like the JPX-850, JPX-900 drivers have two additional weight ports in their soles on the heel and toe of the clubs. They allow golfers to take one of the two weights and make the head either draw or fade-biased. The drivers also have adjustable hosels for lie angle and loft adjustments.

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Also new on the JPX-900 heads is VFA (visual face angle) adjustor that allows golfers to alter the soled face angle of a club, making it more open or closed at address. This is especially beneficial for gear heads who want their club head to look a certain way, or protect against missing shots a certain direction.

Not only is the 450-cubic-centimeter JPX-900 made to be more adjustable than ever, but it’s also designed to be more forgiving on off-center hits. This is accomplished through added technology you can’t see. With its new “CORtech” face design, Mizuno added support behind the face at the equator, but also vertically along the center of the face. This means that shots hit off center, or too high or too low on the face, will have additional forgiveness compared to their predecessors.

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The JPX-900 drivers are adjustable from 7.5-11.5 degrees in 1-degree increments. The stock shaft family is Fujikura’s Speeder Evolution II shaft, which has a counter balance design and comes in a variety of flexes and weights.

Why the Evo II? “With a linear bending profile, it’s perfect for a max-adjustable driver,” Llewellyn said.

Mizuno JPX-900 fairway woods

Mizuno_JPX_900_farirway_woods

Mizuno also implemented the new infinite-track technology in its JPX-900 fairway woods to allow golfers to fine-tune spin and trajectory, so whether your fairway wood is primarily used off the tee or from the fairway on approach shots, you can maximize its effectiveness.

Move the track forward and a JPX-900 fairway wood becomes a lower-spinning, lower-flying option from the tee. Move it rearward and it becomes a higher-spinning, higher-launching club with more forgiveness to give you a better chance of hitting and staying on the green with your long approach shots. With Mizuno’s infinite track, spin rates can change by 450 rpm, according to Mizuno’s testing.

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Also in the JPX-900 woods are a “Shockwave” sole, a waffle crown and a new head design. The Shockwave sole helps give the fairway wood a more forward CG, but is said to maintain high-COR on shots hit low on the face, which is a common spot for golfers to contact their fairway woods, especially when hit off the turf.

“The shockwave acts like an accordion, and concentrates weight forward and low on the face,” Llewellyn said.

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A “Waffle Crown” on the fairway woods refers to the multi-thickness design, which allows weight to repositioned for better forgiveness and lower CG while maintaining strength.

The JPX-900 faiway woods, which are available in 15, 18 and 21-degree stock heads, will come stock with a Fujikura Evolution II shaft and Golf Pride M31 360 grips. They will sell for $299.99 starting on September 16.

Mizuno JPX-900 hybrids

Mizuno_JPX_900_hybrid

For its hybrids, Mizuno focused on providing golfers with clubs that will bridge the gaps between their woods and longest irons. To accomplish that, Mizuno put emphasis on head shaping, which gives the clubs a more streamlined appearance that blends better with a golfer’s fairway woods and long irons

Each hybrid head (16, 19, 22, 25 degrees) was individually designed for the task, with the common goal of giving each club the right look at address. If you’ve ever looked at a high-lofted hybrid and shook your head — the leading edge seems to jut way too far in front of the hosel — you know the problem Mizuno was trying to fix. To solve the issue, Mizuno gave the hybrids a progressive amount of offset as loft increased, which gives the club faces a more traditional, iron-like look.

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In terms of tech, the hybrids were designed with a 1770 maraging steel face, a shockwave sole and a thicker sole-design than its predecessors for a lower CG.

The stock shaft in the JPX-900 hybrids is a Fujikura Pro available in 83X, 73S, 63R and 63R2, and the clubs will sell for $249.99 beginning on September 16.

Related: See what GolfWRX Members are saying about the new JPX-900 Drivers, Fairway Woods and Hybrids in our forum. 

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He played on the Hawaii Pacific University Men's Golf team and earned a Masters degree in Communications. He also played college golf at Rutgers University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.

13 Comments

13 Comments

  1. Rich

    Sep 2, 2016 at 3:23 am

    Link to forum thread doesn’t work for me. Keeps saying error and that I don’t have permission to view that thread and I’m logged in. Please fix it.

  2. Mark

    Aug 30, 2016 at 9:49 pm

    How can a company that makes such gorgeous irons constantly get their woods so wrong? They look bling and Cobra ish and not in a good way. No wonder our local stockists stick to irons and wedges only.

  3. Dave R

    Aug 29, 2016 at 8:35 pm

    Mizuno are probably the best iron I have played, been a ping guy for years but switched this year and not looking back. Still play the g25 woods though hard to get rid of them.

  4. Jeff

    Aug 29, 2016 at 5:45 pm

    For $1200 the JPX 900 better go 325 yards right down the middle every time.

  5. Bigboy

    Aug 29, 2016 at 5:08 pm

    Stick to irons Mizuno.

    • DevilDog18

      Aug 29, 2016 at 11:46 pm

      Why not hit it first then judge in Bigboy

  6. Chance

    Aug 29, 2016 at 5:07 pm

    I loved the 850 and still do as I am gaming it. Never had the respect for Mizuno before I tried that driver. These look just as fantastic. Would love to try.

  7. Lester Diamond

    Aug 29, 2016 at 12:17 pm

    $300 for a fairway wood, and $250 for a hybrid? I also see there is no price listed for the driver.

    Shank.

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Equipment

Puma unveil new Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

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Puma Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

Puma Golf has launched its new Ignite NXT Crafted footwear – a new version of the NXT with premium leather accents.

The upper of the shoe features a premium leather saddle wrapped around Pwrframe reinforcement. The Pwrframe TPU is an ultra-thin frame that is placed in high-stress areas of the upper for lightweight in a bid to offer added support and increased stability.

Puma Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

The new additions feature Puma’s Pro-Form TPU outsole with an organically-altered traction pattern, containing over 100 strategically placed directional hexagon lugs in proper zones, designed to provide maximum stability and traction.

Puma Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

The Ignite NXT Crafted footwear contain a full-length IGNITE Foam midsole, wrapped in Soleshield in design to offer maximum durability, comfort and energy return. Soleshield is a micro-thin TPU film that is vacuum-formed around the midsole designed to make cleaning off dirt and debris effortless.

Puma Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

Speaking on the new Ignite NXT Crafted footwear, Andrew Lawson, PLM Footwear, Puma Golf said

“The Ignite NXT Crafted perfectly fuse the beauty of handcrafted shoemaking with modern development techniques to deliver optimum elegance and peak performance. With the combination of style and performance these shoes will appeal to a wide variety of golfers – those who appreciate the classic look of a leather saddle shoe and those who value modern comfort and stability technologies being a part of their game.”

Puma Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

The Ignite NXT Crafted shoes are available in 4 colorways: White-Leather Brown-Team Gold, Black-Leather Brown-Team Gold, Peacoat-Leather Brown-Team Gold and White-Hi-Rise-Team Gold) and come in sizes 7-15.

Puma Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

The shoes cost $140 per pair and are available online and at retail beginning today, June 5, 2020.

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What GolfWRXers are saying about the best Nike driver ever

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@ukgolfclubsales

In our forums, our members have been discussing Nike drivers. WRXer ‘DixieD’ is currently building up a Nike bag and has reached out to fellow members for driver advice, and WRXers have been sharing what they feel is the best Nike driver ever made.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • Ger21: “VR Pro LE? I have two I was still playing last year.”
  • mahonie: “The STR8-Fit Tour was one of the best drivers I’ve played. Still have it the garage and take it to the range occasionally…it would possibly still be in the bag if it hadn’t developed a ‘click’ in the head which I cannot fix. Long, straight(ish) and nice sound.”
  • jackr189: “The VR_S is one of the best.”
  • Finaus_Umbrella: “I played the Vapor Fly Pro, and still do on occasion for nostalgia sake. Sound and feel are great, but it demands a good strike.”
  • PowderedToastMan: “I enjoyed the SQ Tour back in the day, the one Tiger used forever. Do I miss it? Not at all, but it was a pretty good club for its time.”

Entire Thread: “Best Nike driver?”

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Equipment

What GolfWRXers are saying about driving irons for mid-handicappers

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In our forums, our members have been discussing whether mid-handicappers can benefit from a driving iron. WRXer ‘jomatty’ says:

“I average about 230 off the tee on good drives. I can get a little more sometimes, but 230 is probably the average. I’m 42 years old and shoot in the mid to low 80’s. I do not get along with fairway woods very well, especially off the tee, and really don’t get enough extra length over my hybrid to consider using it aside from very rare situations on par 5’s (I’ve considered just going from driver to 19-degree hybrid and getting an extra wedge or something).”…

…and wants to know if he would be better served by a driving iron. Our members have been sharing their thoughts and suggestions.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • MtlJeff: “If you can shoot mid 80’s, you probably hit it well enough to hit a bunch of different clubs. Personally, I think hybrids are easier to hit….but some driving irons are quite forgiving. I use a G400 crossover that is very easy to hit and looks more iron-like. Something like that you might like. Be careful with some of them though because they aren’t always super forgiving, so you’d have to hit them first.”
  • HackerD: “G410 crossover is my version of a driving iron, feel like I hit it straighter than a hybrid. Just as easy to hit as a hybrid.”
  • hanginnwangin: “I shoot in the low 80s normally and in the 70s on my really good days. I have probably around the same or similar swing speed as you. I have been hitting my 4 iron off the tee on tight holes, and it’s been working pretty well so far. I hit it about 190-220. I have a 4 hybrid but just can’t hit it as consistently as the 4 iron, and it doesn’t even go much farther. I have a 5 wood which I only use for 220+ yard par 3s or wide-open fairways. Basically, it’s all personal preference and what you do best with. Everyone is going to be different. Try new stuff out and see what works. But if irons are the strongest part of your game (they are for me as well), I would give the 4 iron a shot. You can get a lot of roll out on the tee shots with it,”
  • Hellstrom: “Don’t laugh, but I bought a 17* hybrid with a senior flex shaft at a garage sale for $5, and I can hit it nice and easy and keep it in play without losing any distance. My driver SS is between 105 and 110 usually and swinging this thing feels like swinging a spaghetti noodle, but it works. I don’t have it in the bag all the time, but I do use it for certain courses. I take my 6 iron out and throw that in, so if I struggle with getting the ball off the tee, I just go to that.”

Entire Thread: “Driving iron for a mid-handicapper”

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