Pros: The TomTom Golfer 2 watch does three important things: provides yardages, keeps score, and tells time/date. The first two are particular to golfers and it displays these simply and well. As for the third, it’s a sleek-looking watch that would be fashionable for various occasions.

Cons: Its watch-sized face may be a bit cumbersome during a backswing. If it is, simply attach it to your bag or put it in the golf cart. The automatic shot detection, based on movements of your wrist, can pick up practice swings and add those to your score (although there is a fix for this!).

Who’s It For: The TomTom Golfer 2 is for the golfer who prefers to not point and shoot a laser rangefinder. It’s also for those who want to keep score/stats digitally and transfer them via app to tablet, phone or computer.

Overview

First things first; let’s wear this! The TomTom Golfer 2 has a major face plate and minor toggle button, anchored in a plastic case. On the bottom of the case is the charge plate, where you dock the USB charger. The entire plastic case is set into a rubber wristband, highlighted by a metal, tri-fold sizer with 9 wrist-thickness settings. The watch is easily adjusted to fit a variety of wrist sizes, though. Two buttons, squeezed simultaneously, release the tri-fold sizer for simplified on-off of the watch. Wearing this watch couldn’t be easier or more comfortable.

GOLFER2_BLACK_BackAngle_S (Small)

Next, let’s use this! The TomTom Golfer 2 has a toggle button that serves as the bridge for all your tasks. You have access to a number of screens, some of which provide data and others that allow you to log each shot you take. Since I preferred to hold the Golfer 2, rather than wear it, I used my thumb to move from screen to screen. If you’re wearing the watch, it’s easier to use your index finger to cycle through the options. Either way, it’s easy to do.

GOLFER2_BLACK_Front_DISTANCE_S (Small)

Finally, let’s sync this! The TomTom MySports app allows you to sync the watch with your phone, tablet or computer, then transfer each round’s data (score, greens in regulation, putts) between devices. After setting up an account at the TomTom site, the bluetooth connection is seamless and nearly instantaneous. For number crunchers and data junkies, you’ll have all the information you need to review your round and plan your practice.

The Review

When you arrive at your golf course, the TomTom Golfer 2 locks onto the layout and welcomes you to the first hole. From there, it’s in your hands and up to you. Toggle to the right and you’ll see the first set of readings: yardages to the front, middle, and rear of the green. Unless you’re on a par-3, you need more than this. A second bump to the right brings up a screen with yardages to hazards on the course. These include bunkers, creeks and other water elements. If you’re interested in yardages to every potential feature on a golf course, here’s where a rangefinder offers just a bit more than the watch… assuming you lock in on the proper target.

At this secondary point, toggle up or down to bring up six additional screens. One is a close-up of the green, another tells you yardage to the green, a third tells you how many calories you’ve burned — Nos. 4 and 5 give you time of day and time of round, and the last tells you how many shots you’ve taken on the hole (and can log putts separately!). As mentioned in the Cons section, the TomTom Golfer 2 is susceptible to picking up practice swings and recording them as strokes. If you want to use the device for accurate scoring, I’d suggest attaching it to your bag (when walking) or leaving it in the cart (if riding). I played a tournament recently and used a push cart for all 36 holes over two days. I secured the TomTom Golfer 2 to my bag strap and used it for yardages on every hole.

GOLFER2_BLACK_Right_HAZARDS (Small)

After the round, as you parse your data, the MySports app allows you to zero in on an overhead shot of the course and review your round. If you find that the score needs proper editing, you may do so within the app, adjusting numbers of putts and strokes accordingly. Rounds may be deleted with a leftward swipe of the finger.

TomTom’s first venture into the golf watch market was the original TomTom Golfer. Available in two versions, the original offered many of the features found in model 2.0. The upgrades include automatic shot detection, shot history analysis, and the automatic scorecard. The premium edition of the original watch costs the same as the TomTom Golfer 2, with the hand-crafted italian leather band, ball marker and cart bag mount unique to the premium edition.

The life of a USB charge of the TomTom Golfer 2 will depend on how often you consult and manipulate the device during a round of golf. If you wear it as a watch most days, your battery life will be measured in weeks. If you undertake a great deal of input and output of data, you will find yourself charging every 48 to 72 hours.

The Takeaway

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The TomTom Golfer 2 lists for $249 on the company website. If you like the look of the watch, you’re halfway to the purchase. The watch face is attractive, and reads time and date easily. As for the real reason behind the purchase, the distance measurements are very accurate (I tested them against my rangefinder and various course markings and they were spot on) and give you readings above and beyond front, center, and back of green. If you’re over the point-and-shoot of a laser rangefinder and want something easier to use, this device delivers what it promises. If the price is right, the TomTom Golfer 2 is yours.

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22 COMMENTS

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  1. I’ve never used a golf watch. I don’t quite understand the purpose of them anymore, but I also can’t stand anything other than a glove on my hands/wrist – I even store my wedding band in the bag during the round.

    This is only my 3rd season playing so I’m a bit of the newer generation of golfer, but for me, a range finder and knowing the pin position for the day is enough to make a decision on club selection. Golf specific GPS watches have always seemed a bit gimmicky to me, but i know there are a lot of seasoned players who jumped on board and love them.

    For me, I like Arccos. I now know my distances and can see where I need to practice in order to shave strokes off my round. I already (like most people) have a smart phone I carry with me so for about the same cost of a GPS watch, I got a system that arguably has more benefit for my game. The only time(s) I need a distance that a laser finder can’t help with is distance to the trouble or a bunker in which case I usually pull my phone out of my pocket and use the Arccos app to find that info.

    Do you see golf specific GPS watches for $250 sticking around long term or do you think they will be replaced by smart phone + watch?

  2. This review is a gem – a perfect combination of overview, how-to and user impressions augmented by straightforward, relevant photos and writing that reflects a rare ability to personalize notable aspects of ownership.

    I’m good with my laser but gave this a second read just to enjoy your structure, editing and presentation – thanks for an exemplary experience.

  3. Agree with Birdy, i have a Busnell Neo and Leopold 3. Would love to know exact distance of each shot taken. Would certainly help in your course management and club selection. Nice lookin’ watch!

  4. review says this watch may be bit cumbersome……why? is this because you don’t like wearing a watch while playing golf……or is this watch larger than other similar watches recently released. it it cumbersome while a certain other watch isn’t, or do you just prefer not wearing a watch. if you’re going to write a review, this info would help.

      • i get that you don’t like wearing a watch….then why write a review on the watch if you already have bias against them. the watches comfort should be based on comparing it to wearing other watches. more comfortable, less comfortable. simply calling it cumbersome knowing you hate wearing gps watches to begin with tells me absolutely nothing about this watches comfort level.

        if i’m a food reviewer and absolutely can’t stand sushi, do you think those who like sushi really want to read a review that i give on sushi? then in the review saying it consists of rice and raw fish. no kidding.

        just saying when doing an equipment review….especially a watch, its all relative. only way to really get a proper review is to review based on what it does and doesn’t do compared to other watches. have you used the other watches? if so, is this tom tom better or worse than a garmin x40, s20, bushnell ion, etc?

        • You are embellishing and extrapolating from my use of the “a bit cumbersome.” You cannot remove “a bit” and use “cumbersome” as a stand-alone quote. To say that a reviewer “hates wearing GPS watches” is not gleanable from a reviewer that prefers the watch on the bag.

          I know many people who remove all jewelry when golfing. If you can eliminate the motion of shooting (and sometimes, with a scope, you shoot the wrong target and get an erroneous reading) and simply look at an accurate, GPS watch face, it shouldn’t matter whether it is on your wrist or on the bag.

          • i get all this. a ‘bit cumbersome’ happy? this tells us nothing. what does this mean. would you describe every gps watch this way, or only this watch? there is a big difference between these two questions. i could care less whether you wear on wrist or bag. but when giving a review it should be done relative to other similar products.

  5. not a bad review…..but seems liek most all watches out recently of coming out do very similar things. it would be much more beneficial to point out what other watches do better than this one and what this watch does better than others.

    just from looking at the picture it looks like it gives you the distance of the previous shot automatically. this is a plus, yet never mentioned in the review. other watches require you to”track” the shot clicking at time of shot and again at your ball.

    you could probably cut and paste 85% of this review to any watch released in last year two.

      • really? why does most every watch track shot distances. because golfers like to know actual yards they hit a shot.

        if i tee off with 4 iron on par 4 i’d like to know exact distance i hit it for future reference. and lets be honest….how many golfers over estimate their distance from the tee. wouldn’t it be nice to look down and see the exact yards you hit your drive. not 300…but really 281. goflers want to know how far they hit their tee shots whether its a drive they just bombed or a long iron on a hole they want to lay up on.

          • look, i’m not trying to be mean….but your profile says you coach golf. you really couldn’t come up with why someone might need to know how far their previous shot went?

            • Correct. I coach golf. High school girls and boys in separate seasons.

              I’ve never known a tournament golfer to say “wow, I hit that XXX yards” over “OK, Fluff, what do we have left to the flag.” If a person is a stats muncher, sure, she/he would need to know distance of previous shot. I’m not and I’ve never been. If kids get to D1 and want to worry about it, fantastic. I don’t think that 95% of golfers care to know how far their last shot went.

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