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Review: Single-length Sterling Irons

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Pros: Custom-fitted, single-length irons drastically simplify swing thoughts and reduce setup adjustments throughout the set.

Cons: It takes time to get used to the feel and appearance of longer short irons and shorter long irons. Shotmaking and trajectory control can suffer with short irons.

Who they’re for: Single-length irons will appeal to serious golfers who are searching for consistency and precision in yardage gapping, but the “system” can suit anyone who’s comfortable hitting a 7 or 8-iron.

Review

Like most golfers, I’ve played my entire golfing life with what’s considered a standard set of irons; the 9-iron is longer than the pitching wedge, 8-iron is longer than the 9-iron, and so on, up to a 3 or 4-iron. Actually, I’d never even considered another way of doing it.

That changed when Bryson DeChambeau started winning big tournaments, which shook up the golf equipment world. As the 2015 NCAA Individual and U.S. Amateur Champion, he not only gave credence to the concept of single-length irons, but put it on the map for golfers everywhere.

Related: Bryson DeChambeau WITB

The thing with DeChambeau is, as golf announcers and writers never fail to mention, he was a physics major at SMU and a very high-IQ golfer. Because of that, average golfers can dismiss single-length irons, thinking they need to be a genius or an equipment geek to play them. Admittedly, that thought crept in my head, too. In fact, if I weren’t writing this review, I would have never actually gotten fit for a set of single-length irons.

SterlingSingleLength4

I played NCAA Division I golf, and always considered myself a feel player. Of course, every now and then I’ll put my swing on camera and see how my planes, technique and tempo look, but on the course I like to play golf with my eyes and hands. I’m more of a “that looks like a 9-iron even though the yardage says 8 iron,” than a “the yardage says 153, so I will hit a 3-quarter 8 iron” kind of player. I play a far different game than DeChambeau, who carries a chart with algorithms to calculate different yardages.

That’s why I didn’t think single-length irons would be right for me, but I was wrong.

While single-length irons may be good for the super technical player who wants to dial in his yardage gaps, they’re also good for a player like me. Rather than having a set of irons and wedges, I simply had a bunch of 8-iron-length clubs in my bag — with different lofts, of course.

Since every Sterling iron/wedge was the same length, lie and swing weight of my 8-iron, I could simplify my swing thoughts to say “just hit an 8-iron.” Whether I’m 125 yards out with a sand wedge, or 215 hitting a 5-iron, I’m thinking the same exact thing: “Just hit an 8-iron.”

Most golfers, like myself and Tin Cup, consider the 7-iron, or maybe the 8-iron, the easiest club to hit in their bag. You won’t believe the amount of stress it relieves to go through a round of golf thinking this way.

That being said…

The first time you put a 5-iron in your hands that’s the length of an 8-iron, it will feel like it’s from a junior set. It’s just plain weird to have an 23-degree club measuring only 37 inches. And holding a 37-inch sand wedge with 55 degrees of loft is equally as weird. It feels like if you hit it full, the golf ball is going to hit you straight in the forehead.

Sterling Irons 7 iron (left) vs. Callaway Apex 7 iron

Sterling Irons 7 iron (left) vs. Callaway Apex 7 iron

Trajectory control did prove to be a slight issue in the higher-lofted irons and wedges. Hitting the low, “dead-hands” shot just feels more difficult to execute when giving up inches of control. Of course, choking down helps, but that does effect swing weight and feel.

On the flip side, trajectory control with the longer irons felt easier than ever. I felt more “on top of the ball,” and never felt like I’d balloon the shot as I do with the longer-length long irons of a standard set. It really feels like you’re getting 8-iron control with 5-iron distances.

The biggest problem I found, however, is hitting clubs outside of the set. When I switch to my shorter lob wedge, or to a driving iron or even driver, the difference in feel is drastic. I have to segment my swing; I have an iron swing, and then an everything-else-swing. This would surely be less drastic with a fitting to adjust my other clubs to feel more like the Sterling irons (lie angles, swing weight, length, etc.). It’s an entirely new system of swinging, and adjustments should be made to the other clubs, as well. This is a change I will make going forward, as I’m committed to gaming the single-length irons throughout the summer.

Related: Barney Adams on his single-length iron experiments.

Around the greens, there can also be issues with single-length clubs. Shots like greenside bunkers or flop shots are basically out of the question with an 8-iron length sand wedge (in my opinion, at least), which is why I still plan to bag a standard-length 56-degree and a 60-degree wedge. Also, yardage gaps between your longest iron (5 iron in the Sterling set) are inevitable, so you’ll need to fill that in with either a longer iron, driving iron or hybrid.

SterlingSingleLength3

As for the Sterling Irons themselves, I would recommend them to a prospective single-length iron user. Also, as Mark Crossfield says in his review of the Sterling Irons, the set could be a great tool for beginners because of their bigger size profile and faces.

Let’s see how they performed.

The Numbers

For testing, I took my old set of irons (specs below) and I hit them against the set of single-length Sterling Irons. I also have a 60-degree wedge in the bag, but did not hit it because I normally would not hit a 60-degree wedge full. But I will typically use it up to about 95 yards, and for most of my shots around the green.

Irons: Callaway Apex UT (2 iron), Callaway X Forged ’13 (3-PW)
Shafts: True Temper Project X 6.5 (+0.5 inches)
Specs: Standard lie angles, lofts 1-degree strong

Sand Wedge: Titleist Vokey SM5 (56 degrees)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold X100 shaft
Specs: Standard lie angle

Yardage Gapping

GapGraphic_SterlingVCally

To see a full break down of the results, scroll down to the bottom of the story.

Looking at the carry distances above, you might be wondering how it’s possible that a Sterling 5 iron that’s 3 inches shorter than my Callaway X Forged 5 iron can fly almost 5 yards farther? That’s the magic of Wishon and Bowden’s design.

The short irons (8-PW, SW, GW) are made from 8620 carbon steel, while the long irons (5, 6 and 7) are made with a multi-material, high-COR design. Wishon/Bowden gave the 5, 6 and 7 irons in the Sterling set hot faces (HS300 variable thickness steel alloy face plates, which are welded to their 8620 carbon steel bodies) and progressively moved their center of gravity rearward to produce a higher trajectory. If gapping is still an issue, Wishon offers a 23-degree 5 hybrid that will produce more height, and possibly more distance.

Related: Read more about the tech and specs of Sterling Irons, designed by Tom Wishon and Jaacob Bowden. 

SterlingSingleLength17

As the numbers show, the high-COR design works to maintain distance and height you’d expect from longer irons, at least for me. The 5, 6 and 7 irons do, however, have an audibly louder “tink” sound at impact, which is different than the softer, duller sound of the shorter irons and wedges. Listen to the sound here in Crossfield’s Sterling Iron review.

The prices for a customized set of Sterling Irons are as follows:

  • Sterling Irons 5 hybrid: $250 with graphite shaft only
  • Sterling Irons #5, 6, 7 High COR Irons: $138 each with graphite, $128 with steel
  • Sterling Irons (8-PW, GW, SW): $117 with graphite, $106 each with steel

But remember, do not purchase a set of single-length irons without first being FIT.

The importance of fitting

A proper fitting is important for any club or set of clubs, but with single-length irons it’s especially important since the weight, lie angle, length and shaft will be identical for all of your irons. If something is slightly off, then it will be slightly off for every single iron in your bag. So make sure to get it right.

Here's JR Robert and I going through a full fitting at his facility in Windsor.

JR Robert and I going through a full custom fitting at his facility in Windsor.

Luckily, I had an extremely knowledgable and talented fitter recommended to me by Tom Wishon: JR Robert of JR Golf in Windsor, Canada. His golf shop has all of the necessities, including a Mitchell digital-bending machine, a “green machine” spec gauge, a turf putting green, a Foresight GC2, a Flightscope, and a hitting net where you can hit any club in the bag.

step0003

Since the Sterling Irons are made from 8620 carbon steel, JR was quite pleased with the ease of bending (it’s no surprise that an irons designed in part by Tom Wishon would be fitting-friendly).

Click here for other approved Tom Wishon-approved fitters.

SterlingSingleLength19

Here’s the specs of the clubs JR built for me after my fitting

  • My irons are 37-inches long, but play just a hair shorter after having bent them upright. I also choke up a little on my clubs, so my irons effectively play 36.5 inches.
  • My swing weights are D4, which JR said will make the irons play around around D1 because I grip down roughly half an inch on all shots.
  • The shafts are True Temper Dynamic Gold X100 (0.370-inch parallel)
  • Standard grips (with 2 wraps)
  • Lie angle: 66.25 degrees
A Sterling Irons 7 iron

A Sterling Irons 7 iron

Here are my lofts

  • 5 iron: 23 degrees
  • 6 iron: 27 degrees
  • 7 iron: 31 degrees
  • 8 iron: 35 degrees
  • 9 iron: 40 degrees
  • PW: 45 degrees
  • GW: 50 degrees
  • SW: 55 degrees

But how will a set of single-length irons coexist with the “standard” length clubs in a set? I show you how I’m doing it below.

WITB Setup

It should be noted that after testing, and extensive on course work, I will be keeping the 60-degree wedge in the bag from my old set. While I like the concept of single-length irons on longer shots, it became obvious that I had more control and felt more comfortable with a lob wedge outside of the set around the greens. Also, since I have the room, I will keep the driving iron in the bag, as well as a 4-iron for yardage gapping purposes.

Therefore, my WITB going forward for the year will be as follows:

  • Driver: (10.5 degrees) — 290 yards
  • Strong 3 Wood: (12 degrees) — 270 yards
  • Driving Iron: Callaway Apex UT (2-iron) — 255 yards
  • Long Iron: Callaway X Forged (4-iron) — 240 yards
  • Irons: Sterling Irons (5-PW, GW, SW) — 120-225 yards
  • Wedge: (60 degrees) — Around 95 yards
  • Putter

This setup leaves me with 14 clubs, and consistent gapping throughout the set.

The Takeaway

Your knowledge of single-length irons may not be the same as Bryson DeChambeau’s, but do not be intimidated by his reputation as golf’s resident engineering genius. Single-length irons are a legitimate option for golfers of all skill levels and backgrounds.

The biggest hurdle in purchasing a set of single-length irons might be that you won’t know for sure if single-length irons are right for you until you go through a complete fitting, purchase the set, and play and practice with the clubs for enough time to get comfortable with the concept. For that reason, I suggest single-length for lost golfing souls who are looking for a drastic change, or super technical and analytical type golfers who want to exact their yardage gaps or any golfer who wants to simplify the game of golf with reduced swing thoughts and setup adjustments.

DO NOT switch to single-length irons without getting fit. If you’re interested in the idea and are near the area, I suggest you get fit for Sterling Irons by JR Golf in Windsor, Canada.

For more information, visit http://www.sterlingirons.com

Expanded Testing Data

SterlingVCally_2-5SterlingVCally_6-9SterlingVCally_Wedges

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Andrew Tursky is the Editor-in-Chief of GolfWRX. He played on the Hawaii Pacific University Men's Golf team while earning a Masters degree in Communications. He also played college golf at Rutgers University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.

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66 Comments

66 Comments

  1. Scott

    Oct 10, 2016 at 12:31 pm

    Andrew, do you have any update on your summer of playing with the Sterling Irons?

  2. Brent

    Aug 1, 2016 at 9:14 am

    You obviously don’t know anything about Tom Wishon if you make this ignorant comment.

  3. Cat

    Jul 28, 2016 at 5:17 pm

    Does anyone make a all-hybrid set of the same length? Looking for hybrids 3h – LW. Thanks!

  4. Brandon Hanson

    Jul 27, 2016 at 1:39 pm

    So I think I was probably the first one to buy a set of these through their website sterlingirons.com, but I had been following the progress of these for quite some time before that. I have been playing them for almost four months now and all I can say is wow!
    I was a very good golfer when I was younger, and I maintain about a 3-4 handicap right now. My struggle as a true feel player was consistency. Not playing as much now I very easily “lose it” between rounds without some practice. Sterling irons have helped out immensely with that issue.
    I bought the 5-GW,SW set at 7 iron length, that have the S2S Superlite Steel in S flex. I was so excited about these irons that I couldn’t wait to be fitted, and bought with just providing general info to the website the first day they were available. Also the closest master fitter I have to me is 95 miles away. My plan is to play with these for a year and then go get a full fitting.
    I also ordered a 59 degree LW from Edel and had them grind and match the swingweight and L/L of the Sterlings.
    Every comment made about the sound and feel and look are correct, these are not for the utter traditionalist. I say that because a short five iron in your hand takes some getting used too. And on the other side a long SW also has the same effect. But in my opinion the look is spot on. So many “Outside the Box” golf ideas stray to far from traditional golf looks so they have small effect and then fade into the background. These irons look great and the differences only exist to improve performance, from a straight up looks perspective, these are very eye pleasing, and in my opinion as traditional looking as they can be without sacrificing performance.
    The only real issue I have had is getting used to short game shots with longer clubs, but it has actually got me excited about practicing again which is a nice bonus. Another smaller issue is a tendency when you first use them to try and over swing the lower irons to make them go farther. But once you get used to the feel and see the length is not an issue that goes away too.
    All in all, Sterling irons have got me excited about playing golf again for the first time in many years, and if you have the time to get used to them, well worth the investment.

  5. jim

    Jul 25, 2016 at 1:04 pm

    this concept isn’t all that new to a point. Didn’t Tommy Armour come out with a set in the mid to late 80’s with all irons based around the 6 iron length?

  6. Left of right

    Jul 13, 2016 at 4:58 pm

    Left handed needed.

    Lefty lives matter!

  7. Peter J

    Jul 8, 2016 at 5:42 am

    The majority of golfers who take up the game, particularly seniors, always have problems with hitting consistent 5 and 6 irons. The reason is obvious. It is because you are farther away from the ball and there is more chance of poor strikes. Probably some of this is in the mind?
    The Wishon concept really is great.They are game improvement irons and if golfers can overlook their vanity for player type irons, all golfers down to single figure handicaps could benefit.
    I have just gone back to Ping Karsten irons from i20’s and my scoring and consistency has improved measurably.

  8. Scudder Graybeal

    Jul 5, 2016 at 8:35 am

    Good topic for the golf geeks I guess. I was around for the Tommy Armour EQL irons. They didn’t last long and they won’t this time either.

    • Jaacob Bowden

      Jul 7, 2016 at 2:36 pm

      I understand the Tommy Armour EQLs included a driver that went shorter distances, had distance gaps bunching between clubs, and also had trajectory issues with low-lofted clubs flying too low and high-lofted clubs going to high and far.

      When we went to work on this project, Tom Wishon and I had the advantage of him remembering what happened to Tommy Armour, the modern day Internet for research, experience in the existing single length market, and technology like Trackman and robots for hit testing to really dial in the design. Because of that we were able to retain the inherent benefits of single length while fixing a lot of the historic problems.

      It will be interesting to see what happens this time around!

      • Ross Sheehy

        Sep 28, 2016 at 8:04 am

        Jaacob, is anybody home at your swingmangolf.com website? I asked for a password reset several days ago and got a blank email posted to me. I have not received a response to my emailed enquiries.

        I’d really quite like to get what I paid for!

  9. Matt W

    Jul 5, 2016 at 7:33 am

    Looking at the numbers, seems like the longer irons are going to fly lower with less spin and the scoring irons are flying higher with more spin. Isn’t this the opposite of desired ball flights? You won’t hold greens with your long irons and will have too much spin on the short ones.

  10. JOEL GOODMAN

    Jul 4, 2016 at 3:31 pm

    stupid idea that was a bust before

    • Jaacob Bowden

      Jul 7, 2016 at 2:41 pm

      Yes, it was a bust with Tommy Armour, but the overall idea was a good one. A few key things just needed to be worked out for it to work well.

    • Brent

      Jul 29, 2016 at 1:31 pm

      You can’t find a single serious reviewer anywhere online that says it’s a stupid idea. It absolutely is not. The first round I shot with mine was the best round of my life. (74) They’re in my bag to stay.

    • 300 Yard Pro

      Oct 30, 2016 at 6:36 pm

      Oh look. Another person who’s an expert on SL irons but has never even hit them.

  11. Richard Seepaul

    Jul 4, 2016 at 11:50 am

    I own a set of BOTH Apex and Apex Pros:
    The Callaway Irons Pictured Look Like Apex Irons NOT Apes Pros’.
    The Apex Irons are Multimaterial (Maraging Steel Faces with Forged Bodies)
    The Apex Pros’ are a forged Iron i.e their aces are NOT Maraging Steel.
    Either fix the Picture or the DATA Slides.

    • Zak Kozuchowski

      Jul 4, 2016 at 2:34 pm

      Richard,

      We photographed the Apex side by side with the Sterling irons because they have a similar size.

      We tested the Sterling irons against Callaway’s X Forged ’13 because they were the author’s “gamers.”

      Sorry for the confusion, and I hope that clarifies things.

      • AT

        Jul 4, 2016 at 7:59 pm

        It’s Ok, Richard just drowned in a pool of his own tears.

  12. Steve

    Jul 4, 2016 at 7:27 am

    What I find more interesting is how badly gapped the current Callaway X-forged ’13s are. Have you checked the lofts lately, or is that just how they have always played?

  13. Mike W

    Jul 3, 2016 at 5:05 pm

    You must have an interesting definition of higher standard.

  14. Pingback: GolfWRX reviews Single-Length Sterling Irons

  15. Mikee

    Jul 3, 2016 at 8:36 am

    Now all we need is a “comparison” chart with results obtained from a 5,10 and 15 handicap. Anyone, anyone, Buehler…….anyone??

  16. Tider992010

    Jul 3, 2016 at 8:08 am

    I know a gentleman that has sold 10 sets of the Sterling irons. I asked him about the comments from people after playing them and he said it was all positive. Everyone came back and bought a gap wedge and sand wedge after playing with them. Makes sense to me. If you can make golf a little easier for the masses, why not?

  17. ooffa

    Jul 3, 2016 at 7:05 am

    OMG, Just grab a set of clubs off the rack and hit the damn ball. Way to much mumbo jumbo. If ya can’t hit the ball play another sport. Man o man nothing like taking an easy game and making it as hard as possible. Swing the club, hit the ball and get in your cart and go your holding up the course.

  18. Uncle Buck

    Jul 3, 2016 at 2:31 am

    Can I please just get comfortable with the 14 clubs and AP2’s I just bought? Now we got single length clubs from Godess knows where! Has anyone won a major, club championship with these things yet? Next thing we’ll know, all the one length clubs will be 4 iron length…….then 5 iron. Sheesh! So what, now you’re telling me my 2016 AP2’s are obsolete? ARGHHHHHH!!!!

    • Scooter McGavin

      Jul 4, 2016 at 12:48 am

      Nah, your AP2’s are good. You just need to cut them all to 37″. Problem solved.

      • Bob Pegram

        Jun 26, 2017 at 1:41 pm

        Does the U.S. Amateur Chanpionship count as a major (at least on the amateur level)? De Chambeau won that with single length irons then got through qualifying school for the PGA Tour with them.

      • Bob Pegram

        Jun 26, 2017 at 1:43 pm

        Don’t cur standard clubs to one length. The head weights would be wrong.

    • 300 Yard Pro

      Jul 12, 2016 at 1:49 am

      Not obsolete. So go trade them in for some nice store credit and go buy some Sterlings

  19. Matty

    Jul 2, 2016 at 8:03 pm

    Andrew, would you classify the Sterling irons as game improvement (like the AP1, M2, G) or better-player (like AP2, Apex, I)?

    • Jaacob Bowden

      Jul 7, 2016 at 2:47 pm

      Tom Wishon and I would classify these as game improvement. Roughly 75% of the market swings a driver between 85-105 mph. So to minimize risk and also make the most amount of difference, we really tried to dial the clubs, distance gapping, etc in for this golfer profile. That being said, since they are middle of the road, both beginners and better-players/professionals can play them too.

  20. Chris

    Jul 2, 2016 at 8:02 pm

    Didn’t he major in physics, not engineering?

    • mhendon

      Jul 2, 2016 at 9:28 pm

      Yes quantum physics

      • Bob Jones

        Jul 4, 2016 at 11:19 am

        …which means if he hits a blind shot into the green, until he gets to a place where he can see the ball, it is both on the green and off the green at the same time.

    • Zak Kozuchowski

      Jul 2, 2016 at 9:32 pm

      Thanks for pointing that out. Our mistake.

  21. Wants SL irons bad

    Jul 2, 2016 at 7:50 pm

    PLEASE MAKE THESE IN LEFT HAND?!?!

    Pleaseeeeeee

    • Wants SL irons bad

      Jul 2, 2016 at 7:51 pm

      And make a 4 iron too, left handed, purty please.

    • BJ

      Jul 3, 2016 at 3:37 pm

      +1

    • Jaacob Bowden

      Jul 7, 2016 at 3:01 pm

      We would definitely love to make a left-handed version…and we’re looking in to it!

      With golf clubs, typically the manufacturers require a minimum order. So there is upfront cost to consider. We just want to make sure the order volume is there before we hit the go-button.

      But my hope is that we’ll have something available for 2017.

  22. Leon

    Jul 2, 2016 at 3:12 pm

    Make the 4, 5, 6 irons of your current set to the same length, lie angle and swing weight as your 6 or 7 irons (4 degrees of loft gap), and leave all the remaining clubs untouched. Then all the cons you mentioned will be resolved.

    The single length idea has been around for 30 years, it is just the golf media and Bryson make it pop up recently.

    • Jared

      Jul 2, 2016 at 4:32 pm

      This wouldn’t work. The reason the Sterling irons go as far as the do I because they are high COR designs. You wouldn’t get the distance out of the long irons from a normal set

    • Mat

      Jul 4, 2016 at 5:50 am

      Won’t work. You’d want to equalise your 8-iron and down if anything. Leave the gaps in the 7 and up with a “normal” set. As Jared pointed out, it’s the long irons that get “confusing” if you use stock heads.

    • Bob Pegram

      Jun 26, 2017 at 1:47 pm

      Actually single length irons have been aroundsat least since the 1920s. Bobby Jones used them to win the U.S. Open, U.S. Amateur, British Open, and British Amateur.

  23. Mike

    Jul 2, 2016 at 2:33 pm

    Looking at the numbers, the most amazing thing to me is that Wishon has been able to produce irons with a near 1.5 smash factor, and Callaway still can’t.

    • Nick

      Jul 2, 2016 at 4:17 pm

      Smash factors for irons should not be even approaching 1.5, unless the loft is incredibly strong or it is a non conforming club or just a smothered swing. Tour average for smash factor for a driver is 1.49~. 6 iron average on tour is 1.39~ with varied manufacturers. I would be highly suspect of an iron that could produce a smash factor of 1.5 routinely

      • George

        Jul 2, 2016 at 8:01 pm

        Have you tried wishon clubs out before? They hold their own against anything out there

      • Mike W

        Jul 3, 2016 at 12:41 am

        Well the numbers are right there. The Wishon irons have a COR of .83, which tranalates to a smash factor of 1.5. Why can’t Callaway’s premium distance iron do that? I’m genuinely curious.

        • Mike W

          Jul 3, 2016 at 5:03 pm

          Where in the review did the author mention hotspots? Actually, where in anyone review has anyone mentioned hotspots on these SLI? Actually, where has anyone ever mentioned hot spots on any Wishon high COR irons? Never? Oh, ok thanks.

          Again, why can’t Callaway make irons with a 1.5 COR face?

        • ca1879

          Jul 4, 2016 at 5:38 pm

          Nick is right. Loft is a factor in the maximum achievable smash factor.
          From Tutelman:
          SF = Vball/Vclubhead
          = (1 + CoR)/(1 + Ball Mass/Head Mass) * cosine(loft) * (1 – 0.14*miss)
          From that you can see even with an equal CoR, the higher loft limits the achievable SF of an iron to less than of a driver.

        • Shelby

          Jul 26, 2016 at 5:36 pm

          I would beg to differ. You may want to do your research as to who Tom Wishon is before making a credulous statement. The Sterling SLI do indeed work , in fact, very well. Will they be everyones cup of tea? Maybe not.. The fact is that Tom amd Jaacob have taken the SLI concept to the next level of peformance and the ability to professionally fit them to every aspwct of a players swing…and we will more than likely once again, the brand name companies using Toms kowledge of design and the industry to create another product of mass production.
          Golf balls originall started of without dimples and those guys probably got heckled as well for carving nicks in their balls..that just sounds wrong, i know…

  24. Joe

    Jul 2, 2016 at 1:55 pm

    I have a set that is standard Sterling settings made to 8 iron length. Getting fit is a confidence builder but IMO not necessary. If your favorite iron is a 7 or 8 iron then the ordering the Sterlings with this in mind will fit you fine. I did order mine 2 degree flat because through many years of playing found that is what fits my swing.

    The biggest difference I have found that for me has been a mental adjustment. I have found that when hitting the 6 and 5 irons I have a tendency to try to hit them harder because of the short shafts. I am still fighting this tendency but will work it out. I carry normal length SW and LW, finding that the Sterling irons were too long for me to finnese.

    • CL

      Jul 2, 2016 at 6:55 pm

      This comment about how you’re 2 degrees flat, is worthless, as you give us no point of reference of with what manufacturer club you are 2 flat, nor do you tell us what your standard length has been over the years for your clubs.
      So this is just another pointless comment.
      And Smizzle once again, is clueless.

      • Joe

        Jul 2, 2016 at 9:37 pm

        CL: My previous play irons were Ping Karsten, 2 degrees flat, factory length, stiff shaft.

      • CL

        Jul 3, 2016 at 3:10 am

        Again, Smizzle, get back in your cage.

      • ramon leigh

        Nov 24, 2016 at 8:55 pm

        Most all manufacturers produce clubs with essentially the same loft and lie, since they all are aimed at the same audience. Get with it.

      • ramon leigh

        Nov 24, 2016 at 8:58 pm

        Bobby Jones, Tommy Armor and Mo Norman all tinkered with single length clubs.
        What’s more interesting is why they built clubs to different length in the first place.

  25. Christosterone

    Jul 2, 2016 at 12:18 pm

    Ok….so you owe me $1000

    Great article
    A++++++

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Equipment

See what GolfWRX Members are saying about Mizuno’s new ST-180 driver

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Mizuno has recently released a new ST-180 driver that we spotted on Tour at the 2017 RSM Classic. The company’s “wave sole” technology makes an appearance for the first time in a Mizuno driver; the design is used to push weight low and forward to reduce spin rates, and the construction contracts and expands during impact to increase energy into the golf ball. The result is a lower-spinning driver, especially for those who hit down on the golf ball, and increased ball speeds across the face.

The ST-180 drivers have a new Forged SP700 Titanium face insert that allows the faces to be made thinner — saving weight from the face while increasing ball speeds — and they feature what the company calls a “Internal Waffle Crown” that saves weight to help shift CG (center of gravity) low and forward in the head.

There’s a slew of custom shafts available for no upcharge. The stock grip is Golf Pride’s M31 360, and the drivers are selling for $399.99, available in stores now.

Below is a collection of early feedback from GolfWRX members, and make sure to join the full discussion. See more photos of the ST-180 driver here.

Note: The posts below have been minimally edited for grammar and brevity.

GolfWRX Members comment on the new Mizuno ST-180 driver

TeeGolf: I’ve seen the ST180 driver [in person] and it looks like it sits perfectly square to me. And this is coming from someone who has been playing a Titleist driver set 1-degree open for the past 3 years. It doesn’t look closed at all. 

trhode: I’ve been playing the M2 all year. In comparison at address, the ST is very closed. I had 3 customers look at it yesterday too and they all had the same reaction: closed. That being said, I did play 18 on the simulator and hit some monster drives. The head, with the Raijin shaft, seems to be just a little lower spin than my TaylorMade M2. The blue finish doesn’t bother me either. 

akjell: Hit this yesterday at the Mizuno demo day yesterday at Eagle Ridge in Gilroy, CA. Far from a hook machine but definitely a bomber. The Mizuno’s reps put me in a Mitsubishi Tensei White 70X and I could hit this this driver on a string possibly a bit better than my M1. Of the Mizuno drivers of late, this has to be the best one.

odshot68: Ordering it today. Was fit and played a round with it. Optimal launch and spin. Tensei Blue 70x at 9.5 degrees. This is definitely not left bias; first Mizzy driver ever.

nmorton: Hit this today and it’s going in the bag. Just a classic head shape that suits my eye. Been messing around with a number of drivers over the past year and haven’t singled one out. Last long term driver I had was the 850. The ST checks all of the boxes for me…looks great down by the ball, sounds solid and performs as good as any other. What really sold me was how well slight mis-hits performed. I had the 12.5 dialed down so it definitely sat open a bit. Didn’t hit the fairway but it looks sharp as well. 

evoviiiyou: Had a chance to test the driver with a couple shafts last night. The head is definitely deeper than the JPX900 and the footprint seems bigger from he set up position, very confidence inspiring like the JPX900 but a little improved. Finish and graphics are very similar to the 900 which is very nice if you like the satin Mizuno blue and I do love it just like the satin black I recently had done to my JPX driver and 3 metal. 

regiwstruk: My current gamer is a Titleist 917D3, and this is definitely replacing that. I used a JPX 900 from November 2016 through June 2017 — biggest differences are the sound and that the distance is up there with at least one of the leaders in the market. Anxious to see how it does on the course! 

Paul065: It is high launch, low spin yes but I wouldn’t say it was targeted at the average golfer. It’s basically their version of Callaway Epic Sub Zero. Rory used the Sub Zero. 

Tommyj: I went down to Carls yesterday specifically to look at the ST180. I’ve read some comments that the face looks closed. When I picked it up it was in the 10.5D position and did look slightly closed but then looked perfectly square at 9.5D and also square at 10.5D which seemed sort of odd. The shape is not for me, I had a Cobra F6 and while the ST180 footprint isn’t that big its still substantial. I like blue on drivers and the ST180 has a real quality look to it with the matte finish, having said that I’m not sure I’d want to be looking at that shade of blue all the time. The sound was an absolute killer for me, it was completely unexpected because I always associate Mizuno with being traditional and understated… ST180 launch was lower than G400 in the neutral setting, about the same when I lofted the Ping down.  ST180 was noticeably lower than D2. Longest driver of the three was G400, followed by ST180 then D2. For me the ST180 had the widest dispersion with G400 being the most accurate (by a wide margin).

Discussion: Read more comments about the ST-180 driver here

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Equipment

Spotted: Justin Rose is testing a new TaylorMade “Hi-Toe” wedge

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On Twitter today, Justin Rose posted a photo of a never-before-seen TaylorMade “Hi-Toe” 60-degree wedge. As the name suggests, it appears the toe portion is raised; we’ve seen this high-toe design from other manufacturers, and the benefits of those designs included increasing face area on open-faced shots, and shifting CG (center of gravity) to where it’s more beneficial for wedge play (likely higher for more spin and a lower flight).

The wedge is also stamped with “MG” to suggest it’s a “milled grind” wedge, much like TaylorMade’s popular wedge line that’s in stores now. There also appears to be slots behind the face, likely to also shift CG to where it’s deemed more beneficial.

Talks of a TaylorMade wedge with a high-toe design were actually started by Dustin Johnson a few weeks ago in a press conference. His full comments on that wedge are above, and you can join the discussion about the wedge in our forums.

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GolfWRX Exclusive: Patton Kizzire speaks on first PGA Tour win, WITB, new 718 irons

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Patton Kizzire nabbed his maiden PGA Tour win at last week’s OHL Classic, outlasting a late charge from Rickie Fowler. He raised his first Trophy with a bag full of Titleist equipment and a Titleist ProV1x.

Following the event, our Andrew Tursky had a revealing chat with Patton about the win and the clubs he used to do it.

GolfWRX: When you’re leading down the stretch, are you leaderboard watching? Does a big name like Rickie Fowler chasing you have any effect on your mentality/gameplan?

Patton Kizzire: For most of the tournament, I try not to look at the leaderboard. I took a long look on 15…and I just wanted to make sure nobody was ahead of Rickie and closer to me, and I just went from there.

GolfWRX: Do you get defensive or less aggressive down the stretch? Are you aiming away from pins, or are you ‘head down, keep it going’?

PK: It’s all situational. On difficult holes, maybe [I] play a bit more conservatively. I certainly wasn’t willing to take any chances with a three-stroke lead. I was playing the percentages. I maybe didn’t hit the best shots of the tournament there toward the end. The beginning of the back nine — 12, 13, 14 — were not my best tee shots. But I certainly wasn’t trying to play defensive. I was trying to play aggressively to conservative targets.

GolfWRX: Were there a lot of nerves coming home down the stretch?

PK: It was a little nerve wracking, but it wasn’t my first time in contention. I was able to draw on some of my near-misses, especially the Safeway Open last year. I was in a very similar spot on the weekend on Sunday, and I didn’t get it done, but I was able to look back at that and learn a little bit.

GolfWRX: It looks like you don’t do a whole lot of switching. You’ve still got a 913 Hybrid in the bag and a putter that’s been in the bag for years, too. What does your testing process look like when Titleist comes out with new equipment?

PK: Titleist has been really consistent for me since I was 15…I’ve played Titleist equipment almost exclusively since I was 15 or so. Every year it seems they come out with something new, and I have so much trust in it. It’s a pretty seamless transition. I don’t switch much. I try to put the new irons in play, the new driver, the new woods.

But something like a hybrid, you kind of have a club you fall in love with over the years, and I’ve been a little bit hesitant to switch that. The new balls, the new woods, the new irons are pretty easy for me to get into. And the Vokey team…have done such a great job with wedges”

And I have to mention the putter. The Scotty Cameron GoLo putter has been in my bag for about five years. And I owe a lot of my success to putting.

GolfWRX: Do you ever look to switch out your putter, or do you just kind of love that one and it works for you?

PK: I’ve toyed around with other putters here and there, but I always go right back to the GoLo. For whatever reason, maybe because I’ve used it so long, it just seems like what a putter should be. I feel really comfortable with it. I always gravitate back to the GoLo.

GolfWRX: What makes the wedges a good fit for you?

PK: The way they go through the turf. I like to have a strong leading edge to go through the turf. And the lob wedge needs to perform well around the greens and in the bunker. I’ve really been hitting my bunker shots well with my new 60 degree. I have different versions of the same wedges. Aaron [Dill] does great work in the truck. He kind of tweaks it here and there for me, and they perform like expect them to.

GolfWRX: How often do you switch out wedges?

PK: I get a new 60 degree the most…every four or five tournaments. New 56 and 52 every six to eight tournaments. I try to keep that 60 degree sharp. If we get to a course with firm greens and my wedge doesn’t have the bite that I want it to have, I’ll definitely give the Titleist guys a call.

GolfWRX: What kind of grind do you have on that 60?

PK: We call it the “Dufner grind.” I saw Jason Dufner had one like that about a year ago, and I told Aaron, “I want one like that.” I don’t know what the grind is, but it’s really good for me. [Note: The grind is a modified K grind.]

GolfWRX: One last question… How do the 718 irons look and feel different than the 716 irons?

PK: They don’t look a whole lot different. They’ve been holding their flight better in the wind. I’m able to get the long irons up in the air a little bit. That’s something I look for, being able to control the trajectory. I kind of imagine the shots that I want to hit, and the 718s are coming out on the flight that I want them to.

The good folks in New Bedford, Massachusetts, were kind enough to furnish us with some details about Kizzire’s setup.

Titleist tells us Kizzire switched to from the 915D4 driver to the 917D3 the first week it was available at the Quicken Loans National last year. He switched to the 718 irons to start the 2017-18 season at the Safeway. After missing the cut at in Napa, he has finished T10 (Sanderson Farms), 4th (Shriners Hospitals Open for Children) and then won the OHL Classic.

Titleist Tour Rep J.J. Van Wezenbeeck had this to say about working with Kizzire.

“Patton likes traditional look throughout his bag but needs vertical help with his angle of attack.  A 10.5 degree 917D3 helps him with launch but still controls his swing.  The shaft is based on a platform he had success with us early in his career and he really loves the feel.”

“The 917 F2 was a perfect fit for Patton early on.  He loved the ball speed and having a 16.5 allows him get great launch out of a club he has had trouble with in the past.  Titleist Tour Rep Jim Curran worked extensively on finding him a shaft that felt good, was the proper weight, and yet still launched the way Patton wanted. Tour Blue 95 fit the bill – and Patton has been in it for a year.”

“Patton loves the look of traditional irons and the 718 MB fit the bill for his look and his desire to control flight.  Now, as he moves up through his bag, he has multiple options in 718 which really helps his game. He moves to 718 CB at his 5 and 6 irons, and then carries the 718 T-MB at 4-iron which helps gapping and ball flight at the top of his set.”

Vokey Design Wedge rep Aaron Dill regarding Patton’s wedges:

“Patton has a old school approach to wedge selection.  When he finds a wedge he likes he will rarely make a switch. He doesn’t blame the wedge for poor or mishit shots. His technique is smooth and accurate with mid to high ball flight. His 52 and 56-degree wedges have been in the bag for a while now, and his 60 has changed a little keeping the width but changing the bounce angle for conditions. He likes an old school look which is why we add offset to his 60.”

Kelley Moser on Kizzire’s Cameron GoLo:

“Patton has been using a Scotty Cameron GoLo model since his mini tour days. The one he is currently using was a backup that was made for him when he first earned his PGA TOUR card. He had a stock shaft and silver head version that he used for a long time, but he wanted to shake it up a little so we made him one with a black shaft and a dark finish. He loved it and after his victory said he’s pretty sure this one is in the bag permanently.”

Many thanks to Patton for the talk and the folks at Titleist for sharing some insights on the newly minted PGA Tour winner’s WITB.

You can see Kizzire’s full WITB here

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