Connect with us

Instruction

This Hot Wheels drill will get your putting back on track

Published

on

One of the easiest ways to consistently lower your scores is to avoid three putts during your round. And the best way to ensure yourself of a one or two putt is to concentrate on speed, which will help you to lag the ball up to the hole.

Good news for you, there’s a great way new to work on your speed. And if you look around your attic, basement, toy storage area, or your child’s room, you might find the same orange strip of plastic that I use in this drill. It’s a piece of Hot Wheels track, and it looks something like this.

Photographer Mike M Stylist Alison

It’s useful because usually when you’re practicing speed, you also spend time focusing on your aim and mechanics, which distracts you from having 100 percent attention on speed. The track allows you to focus everything on the speed while never worrying about aim or stroke mechanics, because the track will direct the ball at the hole on the right line every time. So all you need to do is put the right speed and roll on the ball.

The Hot Wheels drill

StranoWheels

To set the drill up, flip the track over so you have the bottom rails facing up (I have colored the rails with a black Sharpie). Aim the track along the break of the putt so that a putt struck the perfect speed will take whatever slope is on the green and go in the hole. Then place the ball in the middle of the track.

When we have this setup, I tell the player to look at the hole and take several practice strokes feeling the speed they want to hit the ball to roll it in the hole. After they do that, I have them put the putter behind the ball and stroke it without thinking about aim or stroke mechanics. Naturally, the Hot Wheels track will give them the proper aim and stroke direction, freeing the player up to focus solely on speed.

StranoPuttingDrill

We like to play several games at my club with the Hot Wheels track, each of which helps golfers groove their distance control with the putter. My favorite game is called “Call It,” in which players hit a putt, but are not allowed to look up to see where it went. They have to decide what speed the ball is rolling by feel alone. They call out “short,” “long” or “perfect,” and then look up to see if their prediction was correct. The game is great for building awareness of touch and speed control on the greens.

Hot Wheels drills can be both fun and very effective, so climb up to the attic and find that box of old Hot Wheels cars and orange track. Take a piece to the course so you can focus only on speed, while honing your stroke as well.

Editor’s Note: Rob Strano recently appeared on the Golf Channel Morning Drive show and demonstrated for everyone how to do the “hottest” drill in putting. Watch the segment here: http://www.golfchannel.com/media/four-disciplines-improve-your-putting/

Your Reaction?
  • 29
  • LEGIT4
  • WOW3
  • LOL2
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP0
  • OB1
  • SHANK18

If you are an avid Golf Channel viewer you are familiar with Rob Strano the Director of Instruction for the Strano Golf Academy at Kelly Plantation Golf Club in Destin, FL. He has appeared in popular segments on Morning Drive and School of Golf and is known in studio as the “Pop Culture” coach for his fun and entertaining Golf Channel segments using things like movie scenes*, song lyrics* and familiar catch phrases to teach players. His Golf Channel Academy series "Where in the World is Rob?" showed him giving great tips from such historic landmarks as the Eiffel Tower, on a Gondola in Venice, Tuscany Winery, the Roman Colissum and several other European locations. Rob played professionally for 15 years, competing on the PGA, Nike/Buy.com/Nationwide and NGA/Hooters Tours. Shortly after embarking on a teaching career, he became a Lead Instructor with the golf schools at Pine Needles Resort in Pinehurst, NC, opening the Strano Golf Academy in 2003. A native of St. Louis, MO, Rob is a four time honorable mention U.S. Kids Golf Top 50 Youth Golf Instructor and has enjoyed great success with junior golfers, as more than 40 of his students have gone on to compete on the collegiate level at such established programs as Florida State, Florida and Southern Mississippi. During the 2017 season Coach Strano had a player win the DII National Championship and the prestigious Nicklaus Award. He has also taught a Super Bowl and Heisman Trophy winning quarterback, a two-time NCAA men’s basketball national championship coach, and several PGA Tour and LPGA Tour players. His PGA Tour players have led such statistical categories as Driving Accuracy, Total Driving and 3-Putt Avoidance, just to name a few. In 2003 Rob developed a nationwide outreach program for Deaf children teaching them how to play golf in sign language. As the Director of the United States Deaf Golf Camps, Rob travels the country conducting instruction clinics for the Deaf at various PGA and LPGA Tour events. Rob is also a Level 2 certified AimPoint Express Level 2 green reading instructor and a member of the FlightScope Advisory Board, and is the developer of the Fuzion Dyn-A-line putting training aid. * Golf Channel segments have included: Caddyshack Top Gun Final Countdown Gangnam Style The Carlton Playing Quarters Pump You Up

3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Gareth

    May 15, 2016 at 4:06 am

    Best putting trainer I’ve ever seen was something that Euro player Jason Scrivener developed. Best money I’ve ever spent on my golf game… http://www.theputtingsquare.com/

  2. golfraven

    May 14, 2016 at 4:17 pm

    Like the tip but my son will freak out when I steal his Hot Wheel stuff.

    • LabraeGolfer

      May 15, 2016 at 8:46 am

      Same but my dad lol. He has over 20,000 hot wheels and probably 300 feet of track.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Instruction

How to fix the root cause of hitting your golf shots fat

Published

on

Of all the shots golfers fear, hitting the ball FAT has to be right up at the top of the list. At least it heads the list of commonly hit poor shots (let’s leave the shank and the whiff out for now). After fat, I’d list topping, followed by slicing and then hooking. They are all round-killers, although the order of the list is an individual thing based on ability. Professionals despise a hook, but club golfers by and large fear FAT. Why?

First of all, it’s embarrassing. Secondly, it goes nowhere — at least compared to thin — and it can be physically painful! So to avoid this dreaded miss, golfers do any number of things (consciously or subconsciously) to avoid it. The pattern develops very early in one’s golf life. It does not take very many fat shots for golfers to realize that they need to do something differently. But rather than correct the problem with the correct move(s), golfers often correct a fault with a fault.

Shortening the radius (chicken-winging), raising the swing center, early lower-body extension, holding on through impact (saving it), running the upper body ahead of the golf ball and even coming over the top are all ways of avoiding fat shots. No matter how many drills I may offer for correcting any of those mistakes, none will work if the root cause of fat is not addressed.

So what causes fat? We have to start with posture. Some players simply do not have enough room to deliver the golf club on a good plane from inside to inside. Next on the list of causes is a wide, early cast of the club head. This move is invariably followed by a break down in the lead arm, holding on for dear life into impact, or any of the others…

“Swaying” (getting the swing center too far off the golf ball) is another cause of fat, as well as falling to the rear foot or “reversing the weight.” Both of these moves can cause one to bottom out well behind the ball. Finally, an excessive inside-out swing path (usually the fault of those who hook the ball) also causes an early bottom or fat shot, particularly if the release is even remotely early. 

Here are 4 things to try if you’re hitting fat shots

  1. Better Posture: Bend forward from the hips so that arms hang from the shoulders and directly over the tips of the toes, knees slightly flexed over the shoelaces, seat out for balance and chin off the chest!
  2. Maintaining the Angles: Casting, the natural urge to throw the clubhead at the golf ball, is a very difficult habit to break if one is not trained from the start. The real correction is maintaining the angle of the trail wrist (lag) a little longer so that the downswing is considerably more narrow than the backswing. But as I said, if you have been playing for some time, this is risky business. Talk to your instructor before working on this!
  3. Maintaining the Swing Center Over the Golf Ball: In your backswing, focus on keeping your sternum more directly over the golf ball (turning in a barrel, as Ernest Jones recommended). For many, this may feel like a “reverse pivot,” but if you are actually swaying off the ball it’s not likely you will suddenly get stuck with too much weight on your lead foot.
  4. Setting Up a Little More Open: If your swing direction is too much in-to-out, you may need to align your body more open (or feel that way). You could also work with a teaching aid that helps you feel the golf club is being swung more out in front of you and more left (for right-handers) coming through — something as simple as a head cover inside the golf ball. You’ll hit the headcover if you are stuck too far inside coming down.

The point is that most players do what they have to do to avoid their disastrous result. Slicers swing way left, players who fight a hook swing inside out and anybody who has ever laid sod over the golf ball will find a way to avoid doing it again. This, in my opinion, is the evolution of most swing faults, and trying to correct a fault with a fault almost never ends up well.

Get with an instructor, get some good videos (and perhaps even some radar numbers) to see what you are actually doing. Then work on the real corrections, not ones that will cause more trouble.

Your Reaction?
  • 127
  • LEGIT19
  • WOW6
  • LOL5
  • IDHT3
  • FLOP5
  • OB1
  • SHANK12

Continue Reading

Instruction

Right Knee Bend: The Difference Between PGA Tour Players and Amateurs

Published

on

The knees play an especially important role in the golf swing, helping to transfer the forces golfers generate through our connection with the ground. When we look closer at the right knee bend in the golf swing, we’re able to get a better sense of how PGA Tour players generate power compared to most amateur golfers.

Your Reaction?
  • 25
  • LEGIT9
  • WOW5
  • LOL2
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP4
  • OB3
  • SHANK15

Continue Reading

Instruction

How to eliminate the double cross: Vertical plane, gear effect and impact location

Published

on

One of the biggest issues teachers see on the lesson tee is an out-to-in golf swing from a player who is trying to fade the ball, only to look up and see the deadly double cross! This gear effect assisted toe hook is one of the most frustrating things about trying to move the ball from left to right for the right-handed golfer. In this article, I want to show you what this looks like with Trackman and give you a few ways in which you can eliminate this from your game.

Below is the address position of a golfer I teach here in Punta Mita; his handicap ranges between scratch and 2, depending on how much he’s playing, but his miss is a double cross when he’s struggling.

Now let’s examine his impact position:

Observations

  • You see a pull-hooking ball flight
  • The hands are significantly higher at impact than they were at address
  • If you look at the clubhead closely you can see it is wide open post impact due to a toe hit (which we’ll see more of in a second)
  • The face to path is 0.5 which means with a perfectly centered hit, this ball would have moved very slightly from the left to the right
  • However, we see a shot that has a very high negative spin axis -13.7 showing a shot that is moving right to left

Now let’s look at impact location via Trackman:

As we can see here, the impact of the shot above was obviously on the toe and this is the reason why the double-cross occurred. Now the question remains is “why did he hit the ball off of the toe?”

This is what I see from people who swing a touch too much from out-to-in and try to hit fades: a standing up of the body and a lifting of the hands raising the Vertical Swing Plane and Dynamic Lie of the club at impact. From address, let’s assume his lie angle was 45 degrees (for simplicity) and now at impact you can see his Dynamic Lie is 51 degrees. Simply put, he’s standing up the shaft during impact…when this happens you will tend to pull the heel off the ground at impact and this exposes the toe of the club, hence the toe hits and the gear effect toe hook.

Now that we know the problem, what’s the solution? In my opinion it’s a three stage process:

  1. Don’t swing as much from out-to-in so you won’t stand up as much during impact
  2. A better swing plane will help you to remain in your posture and lower the hands a touch more through impact
  3. Move the weights in your driver to promote a slight fade bias

Obviously the key here is to make better swings, but remember to use technology to your advantage and understand why these type of things happen!

Your Reaction?
  • 15
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL3
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP1
  • OB2
  • SHANK23

Continue Reading

19th Hole

Facebook

Trending