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True Temper’s Area 61: R&D and Project PXi

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Golf equipment companies go to lengths to manufacture the most cutting edge golf equipment designs, and they work equally as hard at marketing their products and facilities under names that describe their efforts.

Throughout the years, some names have been better than others. We loved names like “Futura,” “Anser,” and “Big Bertha.” Others like “Kombi,” “Redwood” and “Diablo” didn’t quite hit the mark.

Golfers might roll their eyes when they hear that golf shaft manufacturer True Temper named its research and development center Area 61 (Hey, are we chasing aliens are birdies?). But at Area 61, the True Temper team has been working hard to create extraterrestrial-performing golf shafts with very foreign characteristics.

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One of these shafts, the PXi iron shaft, goes against the grain of what golfers have used for decades. At around 102 grams after trimming, it’s a lightweight iron shaft that mimics the characteristics of one of the most legendary heavyweight iron shafts in golf’s history, the Project X.

[youtube id=”LFgquIp3sqU” width=”600″ height=”350″]

The PXi was the offspring of a True Temper iron shaft design called the Monaco, which Darren Clarke used to win the 2011 British Open. Monaco shafts were engineered with specific geometry for each iron, meaning the 3-iron shaft was created differently than the 4-iron shaft, etc. Yet all the shafts retained a constant weight because of True Temper’s VWT (Variable Wall Thickness) technology.

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Greg Cavill, who leads design for True Temper’s iron shafts, said the Monaco was never meant for retail. It was initially a research project, and because of its extremely high cost to manufacture, it is no longer offered by True Temper. But its influence lives on through PXi.

Cavill and his team learned from Monaco that special geometry is not just important for each different iron shaft, but for each individual flex as well. While the PXi does not have variable geometry in each iron shaft like the Monaco, it has VWT in each different shaft flex.

[quote_box_center]“Why should high-handicap players use the same geometry as the players on Tour,” Cavill said.[/quote_box_center]

Even though the PXi 5.0 flex and 7.0 flex carry the same name, they have unique geometric construction that tailors to the different ways that golfers with different swing speeds load and unload the golf club.

pxi_px

True Temper’s Project X shaft (below) and PXi shaft.

 

The stiffer PXi shafts are designed with thicker walls in the tip section of the grip, which allows the butt end of the grip to take over during the downswing. This creates lower launch and lower spin results, while allowing the shaft to retain its lighter weight. The less stiff PXi shafts have a shorter and stubbier midsection and thinner walls in the tip section, which helps golfers with slower tempos and less abrupt transitions achieve their desired ball flight.

The PXi’s success has been proven by its place in the bags of two of golf’s best players, Rory McIlroy and Tiger Woods. Another major champion, Y.E. Yang, and two-time PGA Tour winner Jason Dufner have also been spotted with the PXi.

The reason for PXi’s success, according to Cavill, is that the shaft has allowed the best players in the world to achieve more distance, and even go to a longer club length because of the PXi’s lighter weight. For some of these high-swing players, they have also found a smoother, more stable feel because of the fact that most of the shaft’s work is done in the butt section of the grip. Watch the video below for more information on the PXi shaft from Chad Hall, director of True Temper global tour operations.

[youtube id=”RiIvd0Wgz3w” width=”600″ height=”350″]

Did you catch the portion at the end of the video where Hall talks about the aesthetic value of PXi? According to Cavill, the finish of a golf shaft is the company’s next step in shaft technology.

[quote_box_center]“I can’t talk about it very much right now, but we’re working on a shaft that uses the technology of a shaft’s finish to enhance performance,” Cavill said.[/quote_box_center]

You’ve been warned.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW ALL PHOTOS AND COMMENT IN THE FORUMS

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5 Comments

  1. tony_stark

    Aug 21, 2012 at 5:30 pm

    i would like to get some PXI shafts in my mizuno irons

  2. Rodney

    Aug 13, 2012 at 5:12 pm

    How do I get the t-shirt?

  3. Jim A

    Aug 10, 2012 at 9:41 pm

    Zak, Do you know whether there is any material difference between this year’s PXi shaft and the pre-PXi graphite iron shaft from last year?

  4. Scott Hill

    Aug 8, 2012 at 3:47 pm

    Great article Zak, been a Precision then KBS guy myself but this has me interested in trying the PXI

  5. Pingback: True Temper’s Area 61: R&D and Project PXi | GolfRumors.com

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Whats in the Bag

Joaquin Niemann WITB 2020

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Joaquin Niemann - WITB January 2020

Driver: Ping G410 LST (10 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD DI 7 X (45.25″, tipped 1″)

joaquin-niemann-witb-2020

3-wood: Ping G410 (14.5 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD DI 8 X (tipped 1″, 43″)

Hybrid: Ping G400 (19 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD DI Hybrid 95 X (40.25″, D2)

Irons: Ping iBlade (4-9)
Shafts: Project X Rifle 6.0 (-1/4″, D1)

Wedges: Ping Glide 3.0 (46-12 degrees), Ping Glide Forged (52, 56, 60 degrees)
Shafts: Project X Rifle 6.5

Putter: Ping Prototype PLD Anser (Black finish)
Grip: Ping PP58 Midsize Full Cord

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

Grips: Golf Pride Tour Velvet

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Shaft fitting: Is it worth it? – GolfWRXers have their say

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In our forums, our members have been discussing shaft fitting and whether it makes a substantial difference or not. WRXer ‘2ndCut16’ recently snagged a set of heavily discounted T100 irons on eBay and asks members:

“My question is, is it worth going to get a shaft fitting? They currently have DG S300, which was what was in my 714AP2 ( I was not fit for these either), but I’m curious how much the shaft may make a difference? I’m sorry if this has been covered before, I’m just recently was bit by the equipment bug and am trying to learn all that I can.

Given that I saved a good junk of the cost of the clubs, I’d be willing to spend a little to get the right shaft, if it is actually going to make a difference, I just wanted to check here before I spent the $100 for the shaft fitting.”

And our members have been having their say in our forums.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • nhaun2: “I definitely think it’s worth it with the way the technology has progressed the last 5-10 years. $100 seems kinda steep, but I feel like most places will credit that back or at least a portion of it if you make a purchase through them.”
  • Ri_Redneck: “Never worry about paying for something that is worth the price to YOU! If your goal is to be the best golfer you can be, then your priorities are far different from the average weekend golfer. Fitting is typically expensive, but the information you get can be well worth the cost. As ChipNRun mentioned. Most of us have a swing that probably won’t change much over the next few years. Knowing what shaft characteristics fit you allows you to oftentimes choose a set of ideal clubs right off the rack! Knowledge of your equipment will help you make the most of your equipment buying dollars and avoid falling prey to the marketing that is so prevalent today.”
  • thesamewise: “1 million percent worth it. The right shaft will complement your game and can accentuate your strengths and mask some of your flaws a little. I got the right shafts in my irons, and I just can’t believe how much they help.”
  • Ruleschamp: “Not gonna make that much of a material difference in terms of performance but if you want them to feel the way you like the club to feel then go for the fitting and just enjoy the fun.”
  • GLF4EVR: “Piece of mind may be worth it just so you do not have that little thought in the back of your mind about it. I have done my own tinkering for many years now. I have never had any lessons, and all the club building I have done was thru this site. Had the chance to see a professional fitter last year. Spent over 2 hours going over every club in the bag & was charged only $65. Only recommendations were what kind of graphite shafts to put in my irons if I want to switch & to play with the bounce on my 58 wedge. To me, that was the most worthwhile $65 I have spent on golf in a long time. To find out I was correct in all my work & the way I had gone about; it was just about priceless for me. It is kind of strange to not have that little voice in the back of my head anymore with any questions about my equipment & the fine-tuning I have done. My only thing I would say is to make sure the fitter knows what they are doing.”

Entire Thread: “Shaft fitting: Is it worth it?”

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Equipment

Chicago Cubs player Ian Happ auctioning off his 1/1 Bettinardi putter with proceeds going to Covid-19 relief

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Chicago Cubs Centerfielder Ian Happ is auctioning off his PROTO IH8 Bettinardi with all proceeds from the sale going to Covid-19 relief efforts for Cradles to Crayons.

The putter, which is open for bids until June 8, is a custom Bettinardi Queen B 8 Slant Neck milled to 365 grams from Double Aged Stainless Steel.

 

A 1/1 used by Happ on the course, the flat-stick features the MLB star’s chosen logos, including the Bettinardi ‘Hive’ logo in the pocket, IH8 Proto on the sole, and also his father’s initials KH. 

 

The putter comes with a unique team-only issued 2016 World Series Cubs Championship headcover, signed by Ian Happ on the W side and a Lamkin Deep Etched Grip.

 

Specs: 

  • Model: Bettinardi Queen B 8 Slant Neck
  • Dexterity: Right-Handed
  • Weight: 365g
  • Length: 35 inches
  • Face Milling: F.I.T. Face (Feel Impact Technology)
  • Finish: Black Chrome

You can bid on the putter here, with the current leading bid as of June 3 currently at $450.

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