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FootJoy StaSof Glove Review

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Pros: Extremely soft, Cabretta leather. Well-placed seams. Exceptional durability.

Cons: Roughly $22 each. Available in just two colors, pearl and black.

Who they’re for: Better golfers are the ones who tend to buy premium golf gloves, but the durability and comfort of the StaSof means it’s not just a luxury item. There’s value here for all golfers.

Overview

The first thing I normally do after donning my usual “How cheap can I get them” golf gloves is to wiggle my thumb and fingers for a minute. Why? To adjust a seam (sometimes plural) that invariably isn’t where it’s supposed to be. No worries, since I probably paid about $7 per glove.

On a recent roadie, I played 20 courses across America with one glove: a 2015 FootJoy StaSof. I wear a Men’s Cadet Medium on my left hand. I chose the Pearl (white) color, but you can also opt for a black StaSof if you’re going for the J.B. Holmes look.

The glove was provided by FootJoy to GolfWRX for the purposes of this review, and it saw time in Texas, California, Oregon and Washington state.

Performance

StaSofGloveReview

 

I pulled on that StaSof and began to wiggle my fingers in that phantom way that your leg shakes when your cell phone isn’t in your pocket, but you think it is. Those wiggles are ingrained in me, but they weren’t necessary. The StaSof seams were precisely where needed. Incredulous, I pulled the glove off, spun around, did a jumping jack, and put it on again. Same result.

I emphasize this initial reaction because there’s not a lot to golf glove performance. Break it down like this: fit, comfort, grip, staying power. That’s it. Once you know your size, fit is all about the seams. The FootJoy StaSof scored A+ on the seam quiz.

Moving on to grip: If you drop the name “Pittards of England,” I go all gooey like the hyenas in Lion King, when the Whoopie Goldberg character says “Mufasa.” It’s Pittards! What it means is high-end leather, stitched together properly, ensuring a great grip in normal (and some abnormal) weather conditions. If it’s pouring, will the club slip? Yes, it will. FootJoy has other gloves to remedy that concern. But as long as the weather forecast is somewhat dry, you’re good to go with this glove.

Looks and Feel

FootJoyGlove

Unless you’re wearing psychedelic colors on your mitts, no one is going to comment on your glove. Or ask, “Dude, you stuck that approach so tight! Was it the glove?” You might be ready with the answer, “Yes, it was,” if the glove is awesome. And this one is. It feels luxurious.

It feels like the time I checked in to the Mandalay Bay, took a nap on my couch, and it was nicer than any mattress I’ve slept on. Never mind how nice the mattress was…that couch! That’s how this glove feels. It felt that way through all 20 rounds. I put it in the bag when I arrived back in Western New York (where the temps are mid-50s in December and we’re still playing golf) and pulled on the second glove they sent. Ooohh, Mufasa!

The Takeaway

A glance at the back of the glove package reveals these terms: Taction2 Advanced Performance Leather; Moisture-wicking Elastic Cuff; Finer Gauge Elastics; Angled ComforTab Velcro Closure; and PowerNet Mesh. Call them techie terms, or marketing mantras, whatever. I’ll address each one here and give you my final verdict.

  • Leather: Top notch. Softest thing I’ve felt on my skin since that couch at the Mandalay Bay.
  • Elastic Cuff: Part of the overall feel and nothing stood out as egregiously annoying or dysfunctional. The glove didn’t fit “too long or too short,” and even after all my rounds stretching was hardly noticeably in the cuff.
  • Elastics: These are the threads that secure the glove in the palm area. They did their job well.
  • Velcro Closure: It is angled and it does work properly. Is it better than a straight-across closure, the typical arrangement? I think so.
  • Mesh: Sewn into the knuckles with perforations for breathability. One issue I invariably have with my budget-rate gloves is a stiffening of the material after 5-10 rounds. Take a seat and listen up, son: this glove didn’t stiffen after 20 rounds. That’s saying something.

Final Verdict

Try on a FootJoy StaSof glove, and if you like the fit (you probably will) put it through the paces. If you’re paying $6 a glove like me and getting 7 rounds out of it, is it worth it to buy one premium glove instead of several cheaper ones? If you can get 25 rounds out of one glove like me, the answer is absolutely. Simple math that adds up!

[wrx_retail_links productid=”11″]

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Ronald Montesano writes for GolfWRX.com from western New York. He dabbles in coaching golf and teaching Spanish, in addition to scribbling columns on all aspects of golf, from apparel to architecture, from equipment to travel. Follow Ronald on Twitter at @buffalogolfer.

21 Comments

21 Comments

  1. Huub

    Apr 22, 2016 at 11:39 am

    My only (big) problem with leather gloves which are made in Asia is, that they usually made ??from dogs and cats. A terrible cruel industry!

  2. Chuck Zirkle

    Jan 13, 2016 at 8:08 pm

    Great review on the FJ glove. You are absolutely correct about buying cheaper gloves. You get what you are willing to pay for. Most gloves wear out sooner, because they do not fit properly.

  3. Pablo

    Jan 5, 2016 at 7:52 pm

    Nice review… You get what you pay for. Great product and well worth the extra pennies. Would also like to see a players/ sta soft comparison as I wear players glove. Just love that thin leather feel. Peace

  4. Steve

    Jan 5, 2016 at 4:52 pm

    Great article. Started with the Player’s Glove, moved to Sci-Flex but found a keeper with Sta-Sof.

  5. BirdieBarage

    Jan 5, 2016 at 1:19 am

    For a glove that provides the same level of performance at 60% less, you need to try/buy the MG Golf DynaGrip Elite Premier Cabretta Leather golf glove. Soft, durable and fits like a second skin. I have also used Titleist Players, FootJoy StaSoft and Callaway Tour Premium.

  6. Mike

    Jan 3, 2016 at 12:53 pm

    I hit a ton of balls and if money were no problem, I’d use this glove exclusively. I want to find something like this that is say, 1/4 the price.

    • Ronald Montesano

      Jan 3, 2016 at 1:44 pm

      Any leads?

      Alternatively, you could use a cheaper model on the range and save your StaSofs for the course.

      • 2chi

        Jan 4, 2016 at 11:12 am

        I usually play the Footjoy WeatherSofs. I buy them in 2-packs for roughly $20. I played 22 rounds in 2015, plus a fair amount of range time and got through the entire season with one glove…which gives me one in the hopper for next year!

        • Ronald Montesano

          Jan 5, 2016 at 6:42 am

          These are the two gloves for the same hand, right? Have you ever played the wet/cold weather gloves, that come with one glove for each hand?

          That’s an impressive tally for 2015. You must not strangle the club! So much of glove wear is a too-tight grip on the club.

          • 2chi

            Jan 8, 2016 at 11:32 am

            Yes, two gloves for the same hand. And I actually took a lesson a couple years ago, and the first thing he “fixed” was that I was gripping the club way too tight. Took me a while to loosen it, but it paid dividends when I did.

            But I have played with the cold weather gloves, that come with one for each hand. I believe they were also the Footjoys. I don’t remember the actual name for the glove. They were bought in a pro-shop before a 36-hole outing in April. Cold front came in and temp dropped 15 degrees from expected, shame on me for not checking weather before I went. They paid for themselves though. I’ve used them probably 4-5 more times and am pleasantly surprised with them. Sometimes I will also where a standard left hand glove (I’m a righty), and then the warm weather right-hand glove. or swap between them on between shots.

    • rymail00

      Jan 5, 2016 at 12:31 am

      CAUTION-mini glove “rant”

      Like another member poster in this comment thread named “Mike” mentioned I’m fortunate to be able hit tons of balls so I always went the cheap route with the Footjoy (I believe) WeatherSof gloves that were buy one get one for like $20. I always preferred the leather gloves but hitting the range, plus short game area for 2-2.5 before each round, roughly 3-4x’s a week really kinda wore them faster than I liked so the cheaper version helped because I could also retire gloves early due to the how cheap the price was. I use a new glove and once it’s wore to where I wanted to switch it out (probably to early but the two for one deal made it easier to switch them out regularly), a that glove then became my warmup/practice glove. Only because it’d get kinda wet from sweat and then I’d have a dry and fresh “gamer” glove, that would get 2-3 weeks before becoming a range glove, again do the how cheap they were. So the nicer and more desirable leather gloves got passed up for a cheaper style glove.

      Although I did recently switch to the MG Golf Cabretta leather gloves for the last month of our season. They’re cheap, like I believe $11-12 for two of their leather grips. They are Cabretta leather feel like the Footjoy and Titleist leather thickness wise. Also I tried their tour or pro leather glove that’s much thinner for as they say “better feel” but seems to wear quicker (their a couple bucks more) and stretch a bit from the original size like the author mentioned that these Footjoys don’t seem to do. I did a review on here on them. But it seems a lot members had Velcro problems letting lose during their swing which is the worse thing a glove could do.

      I guess you really get what you pay for with gloves. If I had tons of disposable income I’d play these Footjoy or their new (limited edition glove with black emblem I believe). Or a Titleist leather glove.

      • Ronald Montesano

        Jan 8, 2016 at 12:39 pm

        Rymail00

        Thanks for that eloquent and expansive breakdown. I envy your opportunity to practice. Many people have the time, but not the desire. You seem to have both. Tour players, who don’t pay for gloves, can afford to wear a thinner glove for feel; not always so for the paying public.

  7. Scott

    Jan 3, 2016 at 12:13 pm

    You know what’s funny, I totally agree with this article. I used to use the Scieflex and when I switched to mutlicompound grips after a round or a hole would start in my palm. I started to think I was gripping too right. Anyways, the next time I went to buy a glove they only had StaSofs so I was like, “screw it, guess I’m paying more today.” I’m pretty sure I still have that glove and it’s in decent shape. Laugh all you want people, great article by Ronald.

    • Ronald Montesano

      Jan 3, 2016 at 11:10 pm

      Thanks, Scott. I understand the jovial reactions of guys who think a tried-and-true product need not be reviewed. If anyone rests on their laurels, though, we’re not doing our job. I ordered a pair of black StaSofs on the web, I was so taken by this product.

  8. Ronald Montesano

    Jan 3, 2016 at 1:14 am

    And for Tim and David on Facebook, thanks for the laughs. I can take what you dish out. For all the people that are new to golf (and there are new people to golf, friends!) we hope that this review will help them in their search for the perfect golf glove.

  9. Poppa

    Jan 3, 2016 at 12:18 am

    I want a review of the Titleist Player’s Glove next. Complete with comparisons and differences to this FJ product. Thanks!

  10. Dude

    Jan 2, 2016 at 5:27 pm

    Great glove but too long in the pinky finger.

  11. Square

    Jan 2, 2016 at 3:54 pm

    You know you’re in the silly season when there is a review of the best glove already on the market.

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Accessory Reviews

GolfWRX Spotlight: Crossrope weighted jump rope & app

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An 18-hole round of golf averages out to just under five miles of walking, which on its own is a good workout. Once you throw in some potential uphill trekking you get some serious cardio too, but if you all looking for a quick workout between rounds of golf look no further than Crossrope.

Crossrope – The details

Crossrope is a system of the weighted jump rope that allows you to quickly switch the weight of the ropes you are using to boost your workout—they range from 1/4 lbs all the way up to 2 lbs depending on the kit you start out with. There is an accompanying app that helps you go through multiple workout routines and is available free, or you can upgrade to the entire library of workout routines along with more workout tracking options.

This is NOT your middle school jump rope

The handles are heavy duty and feature precision bearings to allow the rope to move smoothly around as you go through a routine. They are also ergonomic and fit into your hand naturally, which making gripping easy, something that is really nice when you’re swinging a 2 lbs coated steel cable around. The handles also come with a fast clip system to make changing cables depending on your selected workout easier too.

The ropes themselves are made from braided steel and are almost impossible to tangle, allowing them to be easily transported and stored when not in use. All in you are getting a premium piece of workout equipment that is effective and easy to store—hard to same the same thing about a treadmill.

When it comes to a workout, skipping rope is one of the most effective cardio workouts you can do, and with Crossrope, you can get both cardio and low impact weight training when using the heaviest ropes, and follow along with the guided workouts.

As someone that hadn’t used a jump rope in over a decade, starting out lighter was a nice way to ease in before moving up, and I was pleasantly surprised how easy and fun some of the workouts in the app were. If you are looking for a fun way to add something to your workouts, or you just want to try something new to get you into golf course walking shape, this could be right up your alley. To learn more check out crossrope.com

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Accessory Reviews

WRX Spotlight: Athalonz EnVe—The best golf shoes you’ve never heard of

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One of the coolest parts of being in this part of the golfing world is being able to shed light on smaller companies that typically get overshadowed by their bigger corporate brothers.

So, this post is about one of those products that is definitely competitive against top golf shoe companies, and it’s made by a company called Athalonz, which is based out west in Arizona. Typically known for its innovative baseball cleats and insole packages, Athlonz newest addition takes the patented design to the world of golf with the EnVe golf shoe.

These have started appearing on the world long drive circuit due to the amount of traction they get, allowing players to swing harder. So for the last few months, I have gotten to wear them and see if they are as good as the company claims.

Athalonz EnVe: Living up to claims

The main selling points of these shoes are focused on two things

  1. Design that delivers more power and stability
  2. Custom comfort that lasts all day

These are somewhat difficult to combine into one shoe, and though they are on the heavier side, Athlonz are completely worth it for the benefits. It is obvious that they made strides to hit each box on the list for a great shoe. The patented design has been adapted from their baseball cleat and introduces a spikeless golf shoe with a circular design that allows the player to gain traction through the golf swing. This gives a player the chance to swing harder and faster without losing their footing. They also offer insole packages that help with correct bodyweight placement to help add an extra layer of consistency.

Secondly, it’s very noticeable that there was plenty of thought given to comfort with a roomy toe and custom insoles to fit your style. Additionally, ankle padding helps to provide more stability and comfort.

On another note, they have a good sense of style with a more classic, casual take. In addition to the pictured white/brown color, there’s a black/grey colorway as well.

After multiple months of wear in all types of conditions, these shoes have performed great for me with all the traction I need and while feeling great throughout the round.

Verdict

I am a person who tends to support smaller companies when I can if they make good products. Any support for them goes a long way—especially in the golf business. Since these shoes will set you back about $150, I wanted to be sure they are worth it for the money and they absolutely are. Seriously, for anyone looking to boost their shoe game and help alleviate aching feet and ankles, give these a shot.

 

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Accessory Reviews

GolfWRX Spotlight: Nikon Coolshot 20 GII and 20i GII

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Every golfer should have an accurate, reliable, easy-to-use rangefinder. With the new Nikon Coolshot 20 GII and 20i GII, you get all of that and more in one of the smallest, lightest packages on the market.

Not only do you get a ton of features, but when you consider these devices start at only $199.99 for the 20 G II and then $229.99 for the 20i GII ( slope adjusted version ), you get one of the best values in a rangefinder from one of the most well-known consumer optics companies in the world.

Review: Nikon CoolShot 20 GII and 20i GII

First Target Priority and 8-Second Continuous Measurement: “First Target Priority” is Nikon’s way of making sure you are picking up the flag and not a tree behind your intended target. There is nothing worse than thinking you have your distance dialed in to then have a shot fly over the green. With how quickly it lets you know the ranger finder is locked, getting that distance and double-checking can happen remarkably fast.

In the eight-second continuous measurement setting, the rangefinder will continuously measure the field of view as you scan the target area for approximately eight seconds. This setting is great when playing unfamiliar courses or trying to figure out the exact spot to a dogleg, tree, or hazard on your intended line.

Bright, 6x Monocular: Nikon is known for its glass and multi-coating technology, from telephoto camera lenses to rifle scopes, if it’s Nikon glass, it’s going to be clear, fog-resistant, and high-contrast for easy viewing. From a viewing experience perspective, the Coolshot 20 GII’s 6x monocular has an adjustable diopter for sharp focusing, along with long eye relief—meaning you can keep your glasses (or sunglasses) on when acquiring your target.

Slope-Adjusting ID Technology: With the 20i GII you have the option to get the slope-adjusted distance for any shot thanks to Nikon’s ID Technology. The mode can be turned on and off by the user to comply with USGA rules to make it legal for tournament rounds. Having tested it out on hilly terrain it’s easy to see why so many golfers mis-club going into greens when elevation changes become a lot more dramatic.

Review

The Nikon Coolshot 20 GII’s size and weight make it ideal for anyone who regularly carries and wants the benefit of knowing distances but without having to worry about weight—it weighs about the same as a sleeve of balls.

The size allows you to hold the units stable. However, I could see for those new to the rangefinder space, it could take some time getting used to when first getting acquainted with it. The best bet for this is to take it to a range or just step outside with it on your next walk and get used to hitting targets before you take it to the course—plus it makes for a fun game to see how good you really are at estimating distances.

Overall, for the price and size, it is one of the best rangefinders on the market. Plus, with a five-year warranty, you can be assured of years of use with the Nikon CoolShot 20 GII rangefinders.

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