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Use the bounce for chipping, too

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Golfers hear a lot about using the bounce when pitching the golf ball. It makes sense, because bounce plays an important role in pitching.

Bounce is the amount of “cushion” between the leading edge of the club and the ground, and it helps golfers avoid the inconsistencies that can result from having the leading edge “stick” into the ground on pitch shots. Different wedges have different amounts of bounce, but they’re all designed to work the same way. To use the bounce properly, golfers should aim to slide the flange or sole of their wedge under the ball, which allows the bounce to contact the ground and glide the club along the turf smoothly.

My question is this, however. With all the talk about bounce in pitching, how come golfers and golf instructions don’t consider it more with chipping?

When a chip shot is hit fat, the cause is often the same as it is in pitching — the leading edge got stuck in the ground and the bounce wasn’t engaged. If that’s been a problematic shot for you, it might not be your fault, because the way chipping has been taught to most golfers actually contributes to the problem.

The standard lesson in chipping has traditionally been:

  • Square the club face and open the stance.
  • Move the ball back in the stance
  • Move the hands in front.
  • Keep the weight left.
  • Use very little wrists while hitting down on the ball.

With this method, I see far too many golfers sticking the leading edge in the ground behind the golf ball. And I’d venture to guess that the majority of golfers I’ve taught over the years have been TOO STEEP when chipping.

Yes, it’s true that with the ball back in the stance, golfers are more likely to contact the ball first — but that’s dependent on the hands remaining well in front of the club head. Unfortunately, most golfers don’t do this, and as a result they hit a lot of fat chip shots.

That’s why if you’re struggling with your chipping, I’m going to suggest another method:

  • Open the club face a little.
  • Open the stance a little.
  • Keep the ball slightly back.
  • DO NOT de-loft the golf club.
  • Keep a little weight forward, perhaps a 60-40 distribution.
  • Use the same firm-wrist stroke you use with the de-lofted method.

Here’s the idea: If you are sticking the club in the turf — often called “stubbing your chips” — and you de-loft and drag the handle even more, you’re just going to get steeper and most likely catch the leading edge in the ground more often. If you are a player who can keep the hands in front and come into the golf ball shallow enough, the de-lofted method may very well be effective for you. Try both ways.

Finally, from a technical standpoint, the more you have the club de-lofted, the more spin you are actually creating do to an increase in friction from the ball being on the face longer. You DO NOT want to spin chip shots. By the very definition of the shot, it’s supposed to run. Ever hit a clean, crisp chip and it checks? Steep and de-lofted with higher spin is likely the case. When the top edge “smothers” the golf ball, yes, we get a low shot, but we also add spin — and the shot often comes off too hot.

In short, I see no real advantage to the de-lofted setup other than personal success and an attempt to stay the yips. And if you’re going to yip anyway, the loft and open face will help that too.

As always, if you would like to advantage to my online analysis program send swing to my Facebook page or dennisclarkgolf@gmail.com.

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Dennis Clark is a PGA Master Professional. Clark has taught the game of golf for more than 30 years to golfers all across the country, and is recognized as one of the leading teachers in the country by all the major golf publications. He is also is a seven-time PGA award winner who has earned the following distinctions: -- Teacher of the Year, Philadelphia Section PGA -- Teacher of the Year, Golfers Journal -- Top Teacher in Pennsylvania, Golf Magazine -- Top Teacher in Mid Atlantic Region, Golf Digest -- Earned PGA Advanced Specialty certification in Teaching/Coaching Golf -- Achieved Master Professional Status (held by less than 2 percent of PGA members) -- PGA Merchandiser of the Year, Tri State Section PGA -- Golf Professional of the Year, Tri State Section PGA -- Presidents Plaque Award for Promotion and Growth of the Game of Golf -- Junior Golf Leader, Tri State section PGA -- Served on Tri State PGA Board of Directors. Clark is also former Director of Golf and Instruction at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort. He now directs his own school, The Dennis Clark Golf Academy at the JW Marriott Marco Island in Naples, Fla.. He can be reached at dennisclarkgolf@gmail.com

11 Comments

11 Comments

  1. J

    Nov 16, 2015 at 10:12 pm

    Dennis, what path do you prefer for chipping?? Some say inside out, others outside in. Confusing. What’s your take on path and face for that matter?

    Thank you.

    • Dennis Clark

      Nov 24, 2015 at 3:24 pm

      J sorry I just saw this…NEVER inside-out, slightly inside to inside is desired. Outside in is WAY better than inside out in terms of lesser-of-two-evils

  2. JPurtell

    Nov 12, 2015 at 2:30 am

    Awesome Advice.

  3. Dennis clark

    Nov 10, 2015 at 3:47 pm

    As instructional authors we simply offer suggestions. If they help great. If not don’t use them. You’ll know right away.

  4. alexdub

    Nov 10, 2015 at 10:30 am

    +1

    Of all the areas of the game, I think that chipping is the one area where you should just hit the ball. Bounce might come into play, but I think the more you focus on mechanics, the worse the chips get.

    (cue Tiger from early this year)

    • J

      Nov 10, 2015 at 12:42 pm

      Using the bounce effectively gives you such a late margin of error that you can get away with less than perfect contact and still have a good result. It’s virtually impossible to dig the leading edge if you use the bounce correctly, so it’s a worthwhile endeavor to learn how to do so. Much better to get up and down on the first try vs. blading and chunking chips, a common malady of the mid to high handicap golfer. Once you get the technique down (it doesn’t take long), you can become more target focused because of the built in margin of error, resulting in better shots in the long run.

      • J

        Nov 10, 2015 at 12:43 pm

        Using the bounce effectively gives you such a large margin of error that you can get away with less than perfect contact and still have a good result. It’s virtually impossible to dig the leading edge if you use the bounce correctly, so it’s a worthwhile endeavor to learn how to do so. Much better to get up and down on the first try vs. blading and chunking chips, a common malady of the mid to high handicap golfer. Once you get the technique down (it doesn’t take long), you can become more target focused because of the built in margin of error, resulting in better shots in the long run.

    • Dennis clark

      Nov 10, 2015 at 3:45 pm

      No question, however as teachers we see poor mechanics all day. There has to be some”how to” to get any feel at all.

  5. KK

    Nov 9, 2015 at 8:46 pm

    I have started to play higher bounce wedges and placing the ball more forward to help my chipping game. Need more practice and course time to really own them but I already love the feel.

  6. Dennis Clark

    Nov 9, 2015 at 6:49 pm

    Other factors include lie, type of grass, slope club design and lie angle. NOTHING is for everybody.

  7. JoeJoe

    Nov 9, 2015 at 2:00 pm

    I would highly recommend looking at Pat Goss video on chipping. Same method but he describes it much better. This Article only touches up on the method. This is the method how Luke Donald chips. There are other minor details such as, opening the club face on the back and not hinging. Also your club needs to stay on the outside path of your hand path!… Either way a great chipping method.

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Instruction

Golf 101: What is a strong grip?

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What is a strong grip? Before we answer that, consider this: How you grip it might be the first thing you learn, and arguably the first foundation you adapt—and it can form the DNA for your whole golf swing.

The proper way to hold a golf club has many variables: hand size, finger size, sports you play, where you feel strength, etc. It’s not an exact science. However, when you begin, you will get introduced to the common terminology for describing a grip—strong, weak, and neutral.

Let’s focus on the strong grip as it is, in my opinion, the best way to hold a club when you are young as it puts the clubface in a stronger position at the top and instinctively encourages a fair bit of rotation to not only hit it solid but straight.

The list of players on tour with strong grips is long: Dustin Johnson, Zach Johnson, Bubba Watson, Fred Couples, David Duval, and Bernhard Langer all play with a strong grip.

But what is a strong grip? Well like my first teacher Mike Montgomery (Director of Golf at Glendale CC in Seattle) used to say to me, “it looks like you are revving up a Harley with that grip”. Point is the knuckles on my left hand were pointing to the sky and my right palm was facing the same way.

Something like this:

Of course, there are variations to it, but that is your run of the mill, monkey wrench strong grip. Players typically will start there when they are young and tweak as they gain more experience. The right hand might make it’s way more on top, left-hand knuckles might show two instead of three, and the club may move its way out of the palms and further down into the fingers.

Good golf can be played from any position you find comfortable, especially when you find the body matchup to go with it.

Watch this great vid from @JakeHuttGolf

In very simple terms, here are 3 pros and 3 cons of a strong grip.

Pros

  1. Encourages a closed clubface which helps deloft the club at impact and helps you hit further
  2. It’s an athletic position which encourages rotation
  3. Players with strong grips tend to strike it solidly

Cons

  1. Encourages a closed clubface which helps deloft the club at impact and can cause you to hit it low and left
  2. If you don’t learn to rotate you could be in for a long career of ducks and trees
  3. Players with strong grips tend to fight a hook and getting the ball in the air

 

Make Sense?

 

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This is an essential video on how to get you prepared for a driver fitting at your local Club Champion or favorite golf shop or store. I will be showing you two essential drills that we use at Wisdom In Golf, which will get you in the right focus for your driver fitting session which will also give you way more accuracy and consistency out on the golf course. What you should be looking for before your fitting session is the consistency of the golf ball hitting the center face of the driver and your ability to maintain an ascending angle of attack to your target.

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Shawn Clement’s Wisdom in Golf has been going against mainstream instruction for the last 40 years. Before that, we had the Snead Squat, and the teachings of Bobby Jones and Jack Nicklaus and Wisdom in Golf has taken it from there while others were too busy nipping and tucking all the talent and natural ability out of the game through video analysis. Those teachings showed up in the ’80s, we have theorized on what to do with our body parts and we have examined under a microscope what the leg work of the PGA Tour and LPGA tour players have. We taught “resist with the legs and coil upper body against the lower body” and paid a heavy price both physically and mentally. Then we said “stable lower body,” then finally, just a couple of years ago, we start saying to “let the hips turn” in the backswing.

Well, we have been doing our own thing and blazing a trail for our 115, 000 followers, and because your Human-machine is free of wires and strings, it knows what to do if you give it a clear task. CLARITY IN YOUR TASK will get you the consistency in the movement and it is important for your mind to understand so you know how to let things happen! Enjoy this video on proper leg work in the golf swing and enjoy the practice in your backyard with the easy drills we provide you!

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