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6 exercises using resistance bands for more distance

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In a previous article, I wrote about how you can build functional speed into your golf swing over several weeks by practicing swinging faster, and using resistance bands to perform downswing band isometrics.

Most amateurs and even professionals don’t work on their speed at all, so when you simply put in a little bit of effort to gain speed, you can make very quick improvements.

If you’re hungry for more distance, here are 6 additional exercises that you can add into your routine to continue building strength and speed to your golf swing.

Note: I’m showing these exercises with resistance bands, which are great if you travel a lot and want to be consistent with the equipment you are using. However, if you always work out in the same place and have access to a Keiser Infinity Series Cable Machine or other similar cable machine, those are OK to use too.

Wood Chops

GolfResistanceBands

Anchor your bands up high, go toward the top of your back swing and stretch the bands/cables down to an impact position.

Do a set of 2 reps (yes, only 2!) and then switch yourself around to do the same for the opposite side. Perform 3 sets and make sure that on the last set you work up to as much resistance as you can safely control and try to set a new strength max while still using your golf posture.

We want to build useable strength and not “hit it out of bounds” strength.

Decline Chest Flyes

GolfExercise

For the chest and the “pushing/throwing” part of your golf swing, repeat the same thing as above but use only the trail arm from your downswing versus using both arms.

Cross-Body Lat Pull Down

GolfStrengthTo focus on your back and lats and your golf swing “pull,” do a cycle using the lead arm from your downswing.

Triceps Extensions

GolfBands

Work your triceps by grabbing the band/cable handle with your rear hand and extend your triceps into your impact position.

Lateral Raises

GolfDistance

To strengthen your trail side deltoid, shoulder, and back, position the band/cable down low, grab the handle in your setup position with your trail hand, and pull it up toward the top of your back swing.

You can also mimic the follow through, and similarly exercising your lead deltoids, shoulder, and back, by going to your post impact position, grabbing the handle with your lead hand, and pulling the band/cable up in to your follow-through.

Incline Chest Flyes

GolfFitnessBandsExercise

To further work the trail chest, position the band/cable down low, grab the handle with your trail hand at a point where you are just prior to impact and extend it up toward the follow-through.

Twice per week, start with the isometrics for a warm-up, move into this routine, and then follow it up with 30 full golf-swing reps where you practice your speed using a feedback device like the Sports Sensors Swing Speed Radar. You’ll not only get a great upper/overall body workout, but you’ll also be doing it in a golf-specific way that can get you on your way to hitting much longer drives.

Note: This article is for informational purposes only. Consult a physician before performing this or any exercise program.

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Jaacob Bowden is a Professional Golfer, PGA of America Class A Member, Top 100 Most Popular Teacher, Swing Speed Trainer, the original founder of Swing Man Golf, the co-creator of "Sterling Irons" single length irons, and has caddied on the PGA TOUR and PGA TOUR CHAMPIONS. Formerly an average-length hitting 14-handicap computer engineer, Jaacob quit his job, took his savings and moved from Kansas to California to pursue a golf career at age 27. He has since won the Pinnacle Distance Challenge with a televised 381-yard drive, won multiple qualifiers for the World Long Drive Championships including a 421-yard grid record drive, made cuts in numerous tournaments around the world with rounds in the 60s and 70s, and finished fifth at the Speed Golf World Championships at Bandon Dunes. Jaacob also holds the championship record for golf score with a 72 in 55 minutes and 42 seconds using only 6 clubs. The Swing Man Golf website has more than 8,000 members and focuses primarily on swing speed training. Typically, Jaacob’s website members and amateur and tour player clients will pick up 12-16 mph of driver swing speed in the first 30 days of basic speed training. You can learn more about Jaacob, Swing Man Golf, and Sterling Irons here: Websites – JaacobBowden.com & SwingManGolf.com & SterlingIrons.com; Twitter - @JaacobBowden & @SwingManGolf & @SterlingIrons; Facebook – Facebook.com/JaacobBowdenGolf & Facebook.com/SwingManGolf & <Facebook.com/SterlingIronsGolf; Instagram - Instagram.com/JaacobBowden YouTube – YouTube.com/SwingManGolf – More than 2.8 million video views

5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. Pingback: The Dreaded Golf Injuries | WeJustGolf.com

  2. Bert

    Oct 29, 2015 at 8:27 pm

    I purchased a set of starter bands and have used them about five days; already notice a difference. Now bear in mind I’m older (70) and have seldom exercised other than heavy yard work. I noticed a little better turn (with balance) and the ability to turn back through the shot. Hopefully I’m not crazy and will continue to benefit from these light isometric exercises.

  3. Patricknorm

    Oct 15, 2015 at 6:43 am

    Good sequencing of band exercises which involves good core and shoulder work. I like the specificity as it relates to a powerful golf swing which basically mimics the driver. The beauty of bands is that it allows the novice to gradually increase the resistance depending on one’s strength. As you progress through this routine and your movements become more efficient, you can increase your sequencing and dynamic movements.
    Having done these, it’s quite easy transistion to a real golf swing. Good core work too.

  4. marcel

    Oct 11, 2015 at 8:37 pm

    there is no specific golf exercise. you gotta exercise all of it… no lower back and legs strength but strong arms will lead to serious injury.

    crossFit or gymnastics will benefit most for endurance and explosiveness game of golf requires.

    • Patricknorm

      Oct 15, 2015 at 6:47 am

      Marcel, ironically these exercise are not for your arms, or shoulders. You need to use your legs and core to perform these exercises properly. Until you do this sequencing don’t slag something until you’ve tried it. I’m guessing that you looked at the pictures only and haven’t tried any of these routines. Or you’re not a golfer. Or , just a gym rat. These band exercises work very well.

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How to eliminate the double cross: Vertical plane, gear effect and impact location

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One of the biggest issues teachers see on the lesson tee is an out-to-in golf swing from a player who is trying to fade the ball, only to look up and see the deadly double cross! This gear effect assisted toe hook is one of the most frustrating things about trying to move the ball from left to right for the right-handed golfer. In this article, I want to show you what this looks like with Trackman and give you a few ways in which you can eliminate this from your game.

Below is the address position of a golfer I teach here in Punta Mita; his handicap ranges between scratch and 2, depending on how much he’s playing, but his miss is a double cross when he’s struggling.

Now let’s examine his impact position:

Observations

  • You see a pull-hooking ball flight
  • The hands are significantly higher at impact than they were at address
  • If you look at the clubhead closely you can see it is wide open post impact due to a toe hit (which we’ll see more of in a second)
  • The face to path is 0.5 which means with a perfectly centered hit, this ball would have moved very slightly from the left to the right
  • However, we see a shot that has a very high negative spin axis -13.7 showing a shot that is moving right to left

Now let’s look at impact location via Trackman:

As we can see here, the impact of the shot above was obviously on the toe and this is the reason why the double-cross occurred. Now the question remains is “why did he hit the ball off of the toe?”

This is what I see from people who swing a touch too much from out-to-in and try to hit fades: a standing up of the body and a lifting of the hands raising the Vertical Swing Plane and Dynamic Lie of the club at impact. From address, let’s assume his lie angle was 45 degrees (for simplicity) and now at impact you can see his Dynamic Lie is 51 degrees. Simply put, he’s standing up the shaft during impact…when this happens you will tend to pull the heel off the ground at impact and this exposes the toe of the club, hence the toe hits and the gear effect toe hook.

Now that we know the problem, what’s the solution? In my opinion it’s a three stage process:

  1. Don’t swing as much from out-to-in so you won’t stand up as much during impact
  2. A better swing plane will help you to remain in your posture and lower the hands a touch more through impact
  3. Move the weights in your driver to promote a slight fade bias

Obviously the key here is to make better swings, but remember to use technology to your advantage and understand why these type of things happen!

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Master your takeaway with force and torques

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Most golf swings last less than 2 seconds, so it’s difficult to recover from any errors in the takeaway. Time is obviously limited. What most golfers fail to realize is that the force and torque they apply to the club in the initial stages of the swing can have major effects on how they are able to leverage the club with their arms and wrists.

Our research has shown that it is best to see the golfer as a series of connected links with the most consistent golfers transferring motion smoothly from one link to another and finally to the club. Approximately 19-25 percent of all the energy created in a golf swing actually makes its way into the motion of the club. That means the remaining 75-80 percent is used up in moving the body segments. This emphasizes the fact that a smooth takeaway is your best chance sequence the body links and become more efficient with your energy transfers.

In the video above, I give a very important lesson on how the forces and torques applied by the golfer in the takeaway shape the rest of the swing. There will be more to come on the subject in future articles.

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Learn from the Legends: Introduction

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There is a better way to swing the golf club. I’d prefer to write that there is a correct way to swing the club, but I know that really freaks people out. People love to talk about how everyone’s swing is different. “There are lots of ways to get it done,” they say. “Look at Jim Furyk’s swing – it’s not what you’d teach, but it works for him.”

To some extent, they’re right. Elite swings do have different looks. Some take it back inside (Ray Floyd). Some cross the line (Tom Watson). Some swings are long (Bubba Watson). Some are short (young Tiger). But these differences are superficial and largely irrelevant. When it comes to the engine – the core of the swing – the greatest players throughout the history of the game are all very similar.

Don’t believe me? Well, let me prove it to you. In this series of articles, I will do my best to show you – with pictures and videos and data – that the legends all move a specific way. Focusing on these elements (while ignoring others) and practicing a certain way is the surest path to improving your golf swing and lowering your scores.

So, let’s get into it. There are a number of important elements that all the legends have, but the biggest and most important of these elements is rotation. Every great player throughout the history of the game has had elite rotation. It’s the most important thing they do, and it’s easy to see. When you’re looking down the line at all the great players at impact, you’ll see hips and torso open.

This is what the legends look like at impact:

1Hips open
2Torso open
3Both butt cheeks visible
4Left leg extended and visible

And here’s what some very good players with less good rotation look like at impact:

These are very successful players (one of them is a major champion!), but they don’t move like the legends of the game.
1Hips and shoulders not open
2Left leg not totally visible
3Can’t see both butt cheeks

Now, there are plenty of nuances to how great players rotate. They do it while keeping spine flexion, for example, and they do it with very little (or no) lateral movement toward the target (lateral movement impedes rotation). I will discuss these things in detail. My hope is that at the end of this series you will have a much better understanding of what separates the legends from the very good… and from the rest of us.

You will understand their “engine,” and hopefully this understanding will help you begin to create your own legendary swing!

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