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Where Tour pros distribute their weight at address

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Weight measurement devices, like BodiTrak, can truly simplify the learning environment when used properly. They help quantify a student’s feelings, and communicate truth to the student when their feelings don’t match reality.

BodiTrak data has been able to confirm that many elite players in the game start their golf swings with more pressure on their target foot. This encompasses our longer golf clubs too, including the driver. Below I’ll discuss why they do, and why you should too.

The concept is simple: counter motion. Think of cracking a whip. A whip makes a more explosive cracking noise when the tip and handle are moving faster in opposite directions.

How does this concept apply to golf? A golfer will create more lateral speed (the first link in the kinematic chain), and more explosive energy by starting with more pressure on the target foot. By applying more pressure to the target foot at the address position, a golfer is giving his body the ability to build more momentum when beginning the transfer of pressure toward the trail foot. That momentum is compounded by the quick change of direction from the trail foot, back to target foot, not unlike the crack of a whip.

Not convinced? If you start with more pressure on the trail foot, your body simply does not have the same amount of time to create equal amounts of momentum compared to starting with more pressure on the target foot. The counter motion will be slower, the cracking of the whip will be quieter and the kinematic sequence will be diminished.

I know many of you may be questioning this information, especially when considering the driver. Haven’t we all been encouraged to start with more pressure on the trail foot for our longer clubs? Data shows us that we want to achieve more pressure on our trail foot during the backswing sequence to maximize the concept of counter motion… not the address position. As the golf club gets longer, more pressure should reach the trail foot during the transition from backswing to downswing.

Here is what many of the elite players are doing on tour today.

Screen Shot 2015-09-18 at 1.26.33 PM

6 Iron Set Up

This golfer is using a 6-iron. At address, more than 60 percent of his pressure is on the target foot.

6 iron Change of Direction

This golfer’s pressure is just under 65 percent on the trail foot during the body’s transition from trail to target foot.

Driver Set Up

At set up with a driver, this golfers has more pressure on his lead foot.

Driver Transition

During the transition, this golfer has 70 percent of his pressure on his trail foot.

If you’re curious to learn more, a good friend, Terry Hashimoto, has a great deal of data confirming the information shared above. Check out the video below to see pressure mapping of PGA Tour Winners Russell Henley, Chris Kirk and Harris English, amongst others, and see how many of these elite golfers have characteristics of this foot work pattern.

By starting with more pressure on the lead foot with all your clubs, you are giving your body an enhanced ability to improve your foot work, which can help you create more of a whip-like effect for more speed, as well as improve your ability to be at a more efficient position at impact.

If you’re not doing this, give it a go. I think you’ll like the results.

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Certified Teaching Professional at the Pelican Hill Golf Club, Newport Coast, CA. Ranked as one of the best teachers in California & Hawaii by Golf Digest Titleist Performance Institute Certified www.youtube.com/uranser

9 Comments

9 Comments

  1. Dave

    Oct 11, 2015 at 10:04 am

    Long winded comment ahead- So, I understand the observation / concept / measurement / theory aspect of this, what I don’t understand is how you apply this? I’m no better than an average golfer, with good balance and body awareness (former collegiate athlete). I’m guessing the answer is to use it as a diagnostic tool and get the help of a qualified teacher to help you sort through it? Or trial and error and see what works? I tried this last year after reading a bit in this concept, and I struggled quite a bit. I see how if you take a typical, repeatable swing of a good golfer or tour player, these types of measurements are probably a great way to correct minor swing issues. They are probably doing 1 or 2 things wrong that can be corrected. Seems there are so are many things that could change where the center of pressure for MY swing lies at address: all of the alignments (feet, knees, hips, shoulders, heels/toes) could have 3 dimensions, then things like spine bend and tilt, starting position of your hands / to the club / to the ball, and many others could cause your body to shift weight. It gets more complicated in the backswing (much of which can be influenced by changes at starting position): takeaway direction/speed, whether you push or drag the handle, early/late hinge, length of swing, upright vs around swing plane, how you load and use the ground, etc. I think all of these things could impact your center of pressure, right? I know I overthink many things in athletics, but a measurement does little to help a player like me without an associated method.

    • marcel

      Oct 20, 2015 at 6:50 pm

      great write up Dave!

      my personal experience with sport and I am quite enthusiast. Tennis – i played for years with no guidance and after like 10 years i had so many bad habits on timing, footwork etc. I took me 18 months to repair at least something back… and prevent tennis elbow etc.

      in golf i took different route – i took lessons right after 1st bucket of balls. game improved understanding improved, biomechanics made more sense… i stuck with older coach AAA+ former NSW open champ – great teacher – no fancy gadgets. I noticed i play really confident when having lessons. I have gotten to 15 handicap – 300+ yrds straight drives, i4 200 yards and I am only 5’7″. i do a lots of gym and crossFit style training tho.

      golf is a precision game and i feel the coaching is the only way how to keep getting better… Jason Day has his golf coach on the bag – mental support and swing correction support – very smart choice.

  2. Alex

    Oct 10, 2015 at 12:46 am

    I notice the pressure is high in transition. What exactly is defined as transition? The exact moment the club changes direction?

    • Tim Mitchell

      Oct 12, 2015 at 8:50 pm

      Alex…the transition occurs when your pressure changes direction from your trail foot to your lead foot. Almost all good players start charging their pressure from trail foot to lead foot significantly earlier than when the golf club completes the backswing motion.

  3. other paul

    Oct 9, 2015 at 11:22 pm

    I wonder if you could redo this with no club in the hands. The club weighs enough to throw off the weighting a bit. It might be 50-50 with no club. Who knows…? If you stand neutral in an address position then the only thing moving weight to your front foot is the fact that hands and club are ahead (towards front foot) so that could be the small percentage forward that we see.

    • Frid

      Oct 10, 2015 at 11:01 am

      5% of 180 pounds is 9 pounds. I disagree that club position will affect percentages more than minimally.

  4. Chris Nickel

    Oct 9, 2015 at 2:10 pm

    Really interesting food for thought here…One question I have is how can you do this and keep your spine tilted away from the target both at address and at impact? Or is that not necessary? Thanks!

    • Alex

      Oct 10, 2015 at 12:44 am

      So – think of it this way…lean over to the right or trail foot, then push your lead foot into the ground harder.

      You can put weight (pressure) onto a foot without having your body aligned over it.

      We need to understand that I think…we tend to think weight = head aligned over it but in reality that’s not the case.

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How Far Away from the Ball Should You Be at Address?

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How far away from the ball should you be at address? This video is in response to a question from Tom McCord on Facebook.

In this video, I look at the setup position. I offer a simple way to check your distance from the ball at address with your driver, irons and wedges.

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Tour Pros Revealed: 3 Tests to See How You Stack Up

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You want to be better at golf, more consistent and longer off the tee. I am sure a lot of you would love to stop hurting. You would like these things with minimal work, if possible. You also want them yesterday. That about sum it up?

In the next 5 minutes, you’ll learn about the one thing that solves these problems for good. Before we dive in, though, I want to tee up three stats for you from my research.

  1. PGA Tour players can jump between 18-22 inches off the ground while LPGA Tour players can jump between 16-20 inches off the ground. Long drive competitors can often leap 30+ inches off the ground!
  2. Elite-level golfers who drive the ball 300+ yards can shot put a 6-pound ball more than 30 feet with less than a 5-percent difference in right-handed to left-handed throws.
  3. Elite golfers in the world can hurl a medicine ball with a seated chest pass just as far in feet as they can jump in inches (ie. a 20-inch vertical leap and a 20-foot seated chest pass).

What do these numbers have to do with you and your game? More importantly, what do these stats have to do with solving your problems? Let’s start by telling you what the solution is.   

Objective Assessment and Intelligent Exercise Prescription

Say that three times fast. It’s a mouth full… But seriously, read it two more times and think about what that means.

It means that before you act on anything to improve your health or your game, you need to objectively assess what the problem is and get to the root cause. You should use quality objective data to arrive at intelligent health and golf improvement decisions based on the long-term likelihood that they will be successful. We can’t just select exercises, swing changes or training aids based on what is hot in the market today or what the latest celebrity was paid big bucks to sell to us.

There is a reason why the infomercials you see today on Golf Channel will be different in 2 months. The same gimmicks run out of steam when enough people realize that is what they are… gimmicks. When looking to achieve your goals of playing better golf and/or having less pain, don’t just grab for the quick fix as so many golfers today do. 

We are in the information age. Information from quality data is power. Using this data intelligently, you can fix problems in a fraction of the time and at a fraction of the cost. Hopefully, I am giving you the power to make a meaningful and lasting change in your game. I’m sorry to say that most amateurs will not be hitting 300+ yard drives despite what the latest marketing ploy will have you believe. But, if you know what tests you can do to measure the areas that affect your distance off the tee, you can at least gain insight into where your biggest return on your time investment will be. 

This is where working with a golf fitness expert can be so valuable to you. Not only can they help you interpret your results from the tests, but they will also be able to prescribe you the most effective means to move closer to 300 yards from where you are right now.  

If you have a problem with your car not accelerating as fast as you would like or not being able to reach top end speed on the highway, I hope you take it to the mechanic and don’t just look up quick fixes on YouTube to see what you can do on your own. The reason you pay the mechanic to fix your car is because that is what they do all day. They will get it done as quickly as possible. More importantly, they’ll get correctly so that the problem doesn’t pop up again in 2 weeks.

A golf fitness expert is no different. Use them for their expertise and knowledge. Once you have a diagnosis of what is holding you back and a plan to correct it, you are on your way and won’t have to waste any more time or money trying silly quick fixes that never stick.

The three statistics mentioned earlier represent numbers measured across the globe by industry leaders and at our facility 3-4 times per year on hundreds of golfers each time. Our facility has thousands of data points. With this much data comes the ability to draw conclusions from objective assessments. These conclusions drive the intelligent implementation of successful solutions directed at the root causes of problems for thousands of golfers around the globe.

The first three statistics have an R-value of over 0.85 in correlation to clubhead speed. Translation: if you perform well in the first three tests with high numbers, you are very likely to have a high club speed. Further, if you improve in any of those three tests relative to where you started, you are almost assured to have a higher club speed than when you began (assuming swing technique and equipment is relatively unchanged).  

Keep in mind that in statistics, correlation is not the same as cause and effect. But when the R-value is that close to 1 and anecdotally you have seen the results and changes we have, you put some weight behind these three tests. So:

  • See how high you can jump
  • See how far you can shot put a 6-pound medicine ball
  • See how far you can chest pass a 6-pound medicine ball from a seated position

Doing so will give you an idea of how much power you have in your lower body, total rotary system and upper body respectively. Train whichever one is the worst, or train them all if you want. Rest assured that if you improve one of them, you will more than likely increase your swing speed.  

By doing these assessments and addressing the one or two weak areas, you will improve with the least work possible. Sounds about what you were looking for, right? If you are able to identify where you need to improve BEFORE you buy whatever is claiming to fix your problems, you will save lots of money and time. You will actually start to improve with the least amount of work possible and in the least amount of time possible.  

What’s next? After completing the assessment tests, start working to improve them.

  • Coming Soon: Lower Body Power for Golf
  • Coming Soon: Upper Body Power for Golf
  • Coming Soon: Rotary Power for Golf
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The 2 Best Ways to Control the Club Face

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In this video, I explain how to control the club face correctly in the golf swing. I offer two great explanations of common issues with club face control.

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