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Review: The Perfect Putter Training Aid

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Pros: By rolling the ball consistently, the Perfect Putter helps golfers find the correct speed-line combination of any putt. Extra accessories help golfers improve their putting skills, and the Perfect Putter doubles as a Stimpmeter.

Cons: It’s $299. So if you’re not serious about practicing your putting, don’t bother.

Who’s it for? Chalkline and Aimpoint users will love this gadget, as will any golfer who wants the highest-quality feedback from a practice station.

The Review

[quote_box_center]”Practice doesn’t make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect,” said Vince Lombardi, the hall-of-fame football coach for whom the Super Bowl trophy is named.[/quote_box_center]

The Perfect Putter — which you’ve probably seen in our weekly Tour photos being used by several top PGA Tour players — helps golfers stick to Lombardi’s coaching ideals when practicing their putting.

Golfers often purchase a training aid in an effort to fast track their improvement, hoping for an overnight fix. The Perfect Putter will not provide that magical pixy dust, and that’s not its purpose. The training aid, which looks a lot like a Stimpmeter and actually doubles as one, helps golfers set up a perfect practice station that maximizes proper feedback.

Here’s how it works: The Perfect Putter is designed with a Clothoid curve, or “Euler spiral,” to transfer maximum energy on the golf ball, which gets it rolling on the green as soon as possible as it exits the tracks. By rolling instead of bouncing, the ball rolls more consistently on the green, which offers multiple benefits for a golfer.

With the help of its additional gadgets, the device can be used to improve your green reading, alignment, speed and putting stroke, but you must be willing to put the work in to see improvements. If golfers do, it will give them the definitive feedback about what’s working on the greens and what’s not.

For a long time, golfers have used chalk lines on the practice greens to get feedback on whether a putt was hit on their intended line. But drawing a chalk line, which works best on perfectly flat putts, has always been a “guess-and-check” ordeal. The Perfect Putter solves that.

Jim Furyk, a known perfectionist, uses the Perfect Putter -- in his flip-flops.

Jim Furyk, a known perfectionist, uses the Perfect Putter. It even works in flip flops!

Here’s a video of how Kevin Streelman uses the device.

Beginners can also benefit from the Perfect Putter, as it provides immediate feedback on the proper speed to use for a given line. The drills below can help build and sharpen green-reading skills.

The horseshoe-like gadgets, or gates, can help golfers fine tune their aim point and amount of break. Get the speed and line right? Good things happen; the ball goes in.

IMG_6780

Get the speed wrong…

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Or the line wrong…

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And the ball will either hit the gate, or make it through the gate but miss the hole. If you keep hitting the gate and/or get frustrated, there’s larger options with more leeway until you develop a more repeatable stroke.

PerfectGates

Gates come in three sizes: Beginner (2.8 inches), Intermediate (2.5 inches) and Professional (2.2 inches)

A great drill to develop your green-reading skills is to visualize the putt, then use the Perfect Putter to see how it really breaks. Aimpoint users can also use the Perfect Putter to verify their reads, as well as measure stimp and the associated arm bend they use to calculate break.

See more drills here on Perfect Putter’s website.

To use the device as a Stimpmeter, which measures the relative speed of any green, drop a perfectly clean golf ball from the “0” setting in two opposite directions and then average the distance. If the average distance is 10 feet, for instance, those greens would be “rolling at a 10.”

To read more about the Perfect Putter, and find out where to buy one, visit their website.

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Andrew Tursky is the Editor-in-Chief of GolfWRX. He played on the Hawaii Pacific University Men's Golf team and earned a Masters degree in Communications. He also played college golf at Rutgers University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.

7 Comments

7 Comments

  1. Jason

    Sep 10, 2015 at 9:19 pm

    We are lucky enough to be friends with the guys who invented this device and this week we got a on site demo of the Perfect Putter. Admittedly this is not for everyone. Nor is it the type of training aid that you buy and get better without lots of effort on your part. But lets be honest, do these types of trainers really exist?

    I am very impressed at the consistency of the roll and the only limitations are based on your imagination or lack there of. The first thing I noticed was how badly I was under reading putts. Especially putts that break away from me (left to right).

    If you are linear or non-linear you can come up with some great drills with this device. However, if you are not willing to put in the work then don’t bother. Like anything else in life, there are no short cuts to being a good putter.

  2. James Saylor

    Aug 13, 2015 at 6:05 am

    It looks perfect, but the price is prohibitive. Maybe, I have to look cheaper

  3. DaveTrom

    Aug 3, 2015 at 4:45 am

    Didn’t Dave Pelz come up with same thing called a True Roller in the 1980’s?

  4. ooffa

    Aug 2, 2015 at 1:25 pm

    Ha Ha Ha you got me good. This thing is a joke right. Man you guys had me believing this article was real for a moment there. A golf ball ramp for 300 bucks. Wow, good one guys.

  5. Steven

    Aug 2, 2015 at 12:16 pm

    It looks cool, but the price is prohibitive.

    A much cheaper option that would do the same thing, minus the stimp meter, is the Absolute Reader by Esoteric Golf. The advantage of it would be that you can actually putt the ball. If I have more practice time next season I might get one (http://www.golftrainingaids.com/Absolute-Reader/productinfo/ABSOLUTE/).

  6. Andy W

    Aug 1, 2015 at 7:25 pm

    Verify Aimpoint with this PP? Still must get that weighted “feeling” in your feet to your brain, which I can’t even feel half my body parts these days. Something that puts a VISUAL angle/gap in you face for each putt for a perfect Greenread at ebay search, “Surveying Putting”

  7. WolfWRX

    Aug 1, 2015 at 7:39 am

    Looks interesting but very pricey.

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Apparel Reviews

2018 GolfWRX Men’s Spring Fashion Shoot

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As promised by our Resident Fashion Consultant Jordan Madley in the 2018 Women’s Spring fashion shoot, below is some much-needed fashion love for the guys.

GolfWRX was on location in Las Vegas at the UNLV college campus where our Director of Content Johnny Wunder went full Zoolander to model the following golf apparel companies:

Also, many thanks to the folks at the UNLV PGA Golf Management program for hosting us!

We look forward to any and all feedback, and your thoughts about the apparel we chose to feature.

Related: Don’t miss our 2018 Women’s Spring Fashion Shoot

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Apparel Reviews

Golf polos with bold patterns: A quick chat with Bad Birdie golf

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Founded in 2017, Los Angeles-based Bad Birdie golf produces some of the most eye-popping polos ever seen on a fairway.

The company’s brazen ambition to “make the most savage golf polos in the world” and its boisterous presence on social media belies an attention to detail and careful pattern curation. It’s easy to make loud, obnoxious clothing. It’s more challenging to produce something that’s at once bold, stylish, appropriately fitted and of high quality. But that is what Jason Richardson’s company has tried to do since entering the market.

I spoke with Richardson about his eye-catching wares.

Before we get into your Bad Birdie offerings, tell me your take on the state of golf wear when you decided to enter the market?

JR: I went shopping for a polo for an upcoming tournament and was hoping to find something a little flashier/fun. I got bummed out when I realized most of the golf polos were generally the same colors/patterns. Solid pastels or stripes weren’t necessarily what I was going for, so I did some research online.

After looking at anything I could find, I realized that most golf polos are almost identical to each other. The only thing that’s really different is the branding or tech fabric. There’s a couple brands making a few edgier patterns but they still have a middle-aged, Tommy Bahama feel that’s not necessarily relevant to the younger golfer.

So building on that, what was the opportunity you saw?

JR: I saw an opportunity to make polos for the younger/trendier/bolder golfer whose style doesn’t fit into the traditional golf trends of pastels and stripes. We have a saying we use on some of our ads: “Your dad called and wants his polo back.” Most young/millennial guys who love golf are having to get their apparel from the same place their dad does. Bad Birdie sees an opportunity to fix that.

Cool. What’s your background in golf?

JR: I’ve worked in golf for a lot of my life. I started caddying when I was 12 at Forest Highlands in Flagstaff, AZ, during the summers, so learned the game while working. During high school, I worked for an eBay store that sold golf shafts that were left over from all the club fitters in Scottsdale. After college and before starting Bad Birdie I worked in advertising.

What’s Bad Birdie’s competitive advantage?

JR: There’s no other brands making performance golf polos with styles like we do. Our team is in their 20s and early 30s so we’re right in our target demographic and have a great network of friends/golfers we can bounce ideas off of. Being based in Los Angeles doesn’t hurt either, as we see a lot of the new fashion trends first.

Who’s your target consumer, and what has the response been like?

JR: 18-35-year-old males (and their significant others who buy Bad Birdie as gifts). The number one customer email we get is guys telling us how surprised they were by the number of compliments they got while wearing their Bad Birdie. Love getting those.

Any upcoming releases, plans we should know about?

JR: We have some new polos dropping in July you’ll want to keep an eye out for.

Who’s the best-dressed golfer on the PGA Tour?

JR: Until someone is wearing a Bad Birdie it’s tough to say.

Touche.

Check out Bad Birdie’s wares here, or check them out @badbirdiegolf on Twitter.

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Accessory Reviews

I tried the great Golfboarding experiment… here’s how it went

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Corica Park Golf Course is not exactly the first place you’d expect to find one of the most experimental sports movements sweeping the nation. Sitting on a pristine swath of land along the southern rim of Alameda Island, deep in the heart of the San Francisco Bay, the course’s municipal roots and no-frills clubhouse give it an unpretentious air that seems to fit better with Sam Snead’s style of play than, say, Rickie Fowler’s.

Yet here I am, one perfectly sunny morning on a recent Saturday in December planning to try something that is about as unconventional as it gets for a 90-year-old golf course.

It’s called Golfboarding, and it’s pretty much exactly what it sounds like: an amalgam of golf and skateboarding, or maybe surfing. The brainchild of surfing legend Laird Hamilton — who can be assumed to have mastered, and has clearly grown bored of, all normal sports — Golfboarding is catching on at courses throughout the country, from local municipal courses like Corica Park to luxury country clubs like Cog Hill and TPC Las Colinas. Since winning Innovation Of the Year at the PGA Merchandising Show in 2014, Golfboards can now be found at 250 courses and have powered nearly a million rounds of golf already. Corica Park currently owns eight of them.

The man in pro shop gets a twinkle in his eyes when our foursome tells him we’d like to take them out. “Have you ridden them before?” he asks. When we admit that we are uninitiated, he grins and tells us we’re in for a treat.

But first, we need to sign a waiver and watch a seven-minute instructional video. A slow, lawyerly voice reads off pedantic warnings like “Stepping on the golfboard should be done slowly and carefully” and “Always hold onto the handlebars when the board is in motion.” When it cautions us to “operate the board a safe distance from all…other golfboarders,” we exchange glances, knowing that one of us will more than likely break this rule later on.

Then we venture outside, where one of the clubhouse attendants shows us the ropes. The controls are pretty simple. One switch sends it forward or in reverse, another toggles between low and high gear. To make it go, there’s a throttle on the thumb of the handle. The attendant explains that the only thing we have to worry about is our clubs banging against our knuckles.

“Don’t be afraid to really lean into the turns,” he offers. “You pretty much can’t roll it over.”

“That sounds like a challenge,” I joke. No one laughs.

On a test spin through the parking lot, the Golfboard feels strong and sturdy, even when I shift around on it. It starts and stops smoothly with only the slightest of jerks. In low gear its top speed is about 5 mph, so even at full throttle it never feels out of control.

The only challenge, as far as I can tell, is getting it to turn. For some reason, I’d expected the handlebar to offer at least some degree of steering, but it is purely for balance. The thing has the Ackerman angle of a Mack Truck, and you really do have to lean into the turns to get it to respond. For someone who is not particularly adept at either surfing or skateboarding, this comes a little unnaturally. I have to do a number of three-point turns in order to get back to where I started and make my way over to the first tee box.

We tee off and climb on. The fairway is flat and wide, and we shift into high gear as we speed off toward our balls. The engine had produced just the faintest of whirrs as it accelerated, but it is practically soundless as the board rolls along at full speed. The motor nevertheless feels surprisingly powerful under my feet (the drivetrain is literally located directly underneath the deck) as the board maintains a smooth, steady pace of 10 mph — about the same as a golf cart. I try making a couple of S curves like I’d seen in the video and realize that high-speed turning will take a little practice for me to get right, but that it doesn’t seem overly difficult.

Indeed, within a few holes I might as well be Laird himself, “surfing the earth” from shot to shot. I am able to hold the handlebar and lean way out, getting the board to turn, if not quite sharply, then at least closer to that of a large moving van than a full-sized semi. I take the hills aggressively (although the automatic speed control on the drivetrain enables it to keep a steady pace both up and down any hills, so this isn’t exactly dangerous), and I speed throughout the course like Mario Andretti on the freeway (the company claims increased pace-of-play as one of the Golfboard’s primary benefits, but on a Saturday in the Bay Area, it is impossible avoid a five-hour round anyway.)

Gliding along, my feet a few inches above the grass, the wind in my face as the fairways unfurl below my feet, it is easy to see Golfboards as the next evolution in mankind’s mastery of wheels; the same instincts to overcome inertia that brought us bicycles, rollerblades, scooters, skateboards, and more recent inventions such as Segways, Hoverboards and Onewheels are clearly manifest in Golfboards as well. They might not offer quite the same thrill as storming down a snowy mountainside or catching a giant wave, but they are definitely more fun than your standard golf cart.

Yet, there are obvious downsides as well. The attendant’s warning notwithstanding, my knuckles are in fact battered and sore by the time we make the turn, and even though I rearrange all my clubs into the front slots of my bag, they still rap my knuckles every time I hit a bump. Speaking of which, the board’s shock absorber system leaves something to be desired, as the ride is so bumpy that near the end I start to feel as if I’ve had my insides rattled. Then there is the unforgivable fact of its missing a cup holder for my beer.

But these are mere design flaws that might easily be fixed in the next generation of Golfboards. (A knuckle shield is a must!) My larger problem with Golfboards is what they do to the game itself. When walking or riding a traditional cart, the moments in between shots are a time to plan your next shot, or to chat about your last shot, or to simply find your zen out there among the trees and the birds and the spaciousness of the course. Instead, my focus is on staying upright.

Down the stretch, I start to fade. The muscles in my core have endured a pretty serious workout, and it’s becoming increasingly difficult to muster the strength for my golf swing. It is no coincidence that my game starts to unravel, and I am on the way to one of my worst rounds in recent memory.

Walking off the 18th green, our foursome agrees that the Golfboards were fun — definitely worth trying — but that we probably wouldn’t ride them again. Call me a purist, but as someone lacking Laird Hamilton’s physical gifts, I’m happy to stick to just one sport at a time.

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