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FAQ: How to take care of your golf shoes

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At ECCO, we’re proud of the praise we’ve received in recent years for our premium golf shoes – especially the hybrid category that we helped pioneer with the help of Fred Couples. Regardless of what model or brand of golf shoes you own, however, there’s one constant. You need to take care of your shoes if you want to keep them looking their best, and enjoy them for as long as possible.

My name is Steve Ryrie, and I’m the Commercial Director in ECCO’s Accessories Division. It’s well known that GolfWRX readers take their golf clubs seriously, but what about their golf shoes? For those who want to know more about how to best care for their treasured kicks, I created this list of frequently asked questions.

How should a golfer properly store their shoes?

Not many golfers take storage into account, but it is actually critical to long-term performance. A leather shoe should be stored in an arid and temperate environment to prevent bacteria from developing and to avoid the leather drying out. Even if your shoes are constructed from textile or other non-leather materials, it is still a good idea to follow these storage guidelines to guard against bacteria-caused odor.

Many golf shoes reside in the trunk of a car between rounds, which is ok for an overnight stow, but it’s not an optimal spot for more than a day or so.

ECCO Shoe Care Kit 2

ECCO’s Shoe Care Kit ($35)

Ideally, after your round, remove the insoles after use and let them dry overnight. You can use a product like the ECCO Shoe Refresher Spray to prevent bacteria from developing inside. A cedar shoe tree is a great help for absorbing excess moisture. It also has a natural antibacterial effect.

Is it ok for golf shoes to be worn multiple days in a row? 

Of course, but to cut down on nasty odor-causing bacteria, remove the insoles and leave them to dry overnight. Doing this in conjunction with a shoe tree is even better.

How often should insoles be changed? 

ECCO Men's Biom Insoles ($20).

ECCO Men’s Biom Insoles ($20)

We suggest doing so every season and maybe twice a season, depending on how often they are worn. If an insole looks flat and has heavy toe marks, the foam on the backside is getting black or has lost their bounce and firmness, it’s time to change.

How often should shoes be cleaned and what should golfers use? 

Once a week is a good rule of thumb, but this depends on how often you play and the weather conditions.

As for cleaning products, there are several methods. The traditional way with which we are all likely familiar uses a shoe brush, cloth and a tin of shoe polish.

First, work the brush over the surface to remove dirt and debris. Using a cloth – an old t-shirt works, too – apply polish in small, circular motions all over, paying attention to areas that receive the most wear. In the golfer’s case, this will likely be the toe. Allow to dry for 15 or 20 minutes and start on the second shoe. Once dry, using the brush, remove excess polish. For more shine, take a soft cloth using a side-to-side motion buff the shoe until it reaches the desired finish.

ECCO Shoe Care Cream_BIOM Hybrid 2

ECCO Smooth Leather Care Cream ($12)

This method is tried and true, but after spending hours on the golf course, however, many players don’t want to put in the time this requires. Our way to address this has been to create products that keep shoes sharp in just minutes. These focus on a three-step program centered on the philosophy of CLEAN, CARE and PROTECT. It’s very similar to how people care for their own skin.

The water-based CLEAN products we offer are like a shower, removing built up dirt and reviving the leathers. Like lotion, the CARE products soften, moisturize and improve elasticity. They are formulated to shine, retain suppleness and prevent leathers from drying out. Last, just as you’d apply sunscreen, our PROTECT products coat to keep rain and stains away.

What about cleaning PU and rubber midsoles?

A traditional way to refresh midsoles is by simply using a brush – an old toothbrush is a common tool – and applying soap and giving a good scrub and repeating the process until they appear brighter. 

However, once again, ECCO tries to simplify this process by developing products specific to these high-traffic areas. From our CLEAN line, the Golf-Outdoor Cleaner and/or Foam Cleaner and a brush are a quick and effective combination for these surfaces.

How does cleaning a leather-soled shoe differ from other styles?

World Classt GTX

Ecco Men’s New World Class ($450)

While all golf shoes should receive regular attention, a leather-soled product represents the pinnacle of quality and should certainly receive special treatment. After all, you wouldn’t buy a high-end sports car and never take it in for service!

With these type of shoes, like the ECCO World Class for instance, you need to care for both the upper and outsoles. A good tip is to use products such like those we offer – a Universal Waterproofing Spray to seal the pores of the leather; Wax Oil to prevent them from drying out and add a slight water-repellant property.

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Steve Ryrie has held various retail and wholesale positions at ECCO for more than 15 years. Based in Switzerland, Steve is currently the global Commercial Director for ECCO Shoes International, overseeing accessories -- belts, wallets, handbags and briefcases – along with Shoe Related Accessories, which encompasses shoe care products and components such as laces and insoles.

17 Comments

17 Comments

  1. Fernando San Buenaventura

    Apr 13, 2016 at 10:13 pm

    How do I remove the dirt stain on the white side rubber sole of my Ecco shoes? Also, I have the color of the toes of my shoes got scratches because it does not have the rubber protection just like the Biom. Is there a touchup paint I can buy to fix it?

    • Andrew

      Aug 18, 2016 at 3:37 pm

      Exactly, I have the same problem. Nothing works for white Ecco soles. I have tried everything, including acetone (nail polish remover) – which works great on my runners. It is something about the type of material that is used in Ecco soles. It attracts stains like crazy. I’m returning the white soled ones that I bought.

  2. Pingback: How To Waterproof My Golf Shoes | Big Foot Golf Products

  3. Cbad Kent

    May 15, 2015 at 1:52 pm

    You totally forgot the all important care of the bottom (performance) part of the shoe. Putting new cleats on your spiked shoes should be part of the overall care as well. Re-cleating the shoes every year is like getting a new set of tires on your car and give you out of the box traction.

  4. Pingback: Scratch The Golfin' Caveman's Blog » Blog Archive » How To Pick Your Perfect Golf Shoe!

  5. Dave S

    May 14, 2015 at 2:39 pm

    Biggest issue I typically run into with cleaning golf shoes is that the white laces get dirty and are almost impossible to clean (short of removing them and washing them in the washing machine). So I end up with a shiny white shoe that has dirty white laces… and there’s no real easy fix.

  6. Golfraven

    May 14, 2015 at 2:20 pm

    I see Ecco is well advertised here. However what I don’t like about Ecco’s golf shoes is the new smooth leather that is not like the traditional leader but more the mix of nubuk and smooth leather – see above laddies model. Horrible to clean or maintain and just is not suited for golf shoes. I always had the impression that these shoes sucked lots of moister and were not dry inside in heavy rain – my wife and I have some pairs. They obviously expect you to purchase their expensive shoe care system. I prefer my traditional Icons or any FJ shoe with normal smooth leather which I can treat and care like a traditional shoe.

  7. Mike

    May 14, 2015 at 2:19 pm

    I recently used minks oil on my eccos and it worked great!

  8. DanT

    May 14, 2015 at 12:45 pm

    I have two pairs of ecco hybrid golf shoes, and both are really comfortable. so i read this article with some interest, and did look for some of the products recommended in the story. However – i could NOT find the products anywhere. True the web site will tell you where ecco shoes are sold – but none of the places carry any of the golf shoe “stuff” recommended. NO one know how to order new insoles. That is a shame.

    • DanT

      May 14, 2015 at 1:02 pm

      MY BAD – a little more work on the ecco web site and i did find where to order the “stuff” discussed in the article.

      • Mat

        May 14, 2015 at 10:32 pm

        It sure would be nice if ECCO would stock this kit in their retail stores… but yet they don’t. Silly.

  9. Adam

    May 14, 2015 at 12:14 pm

    I think with a leather soled shoe with leather upper, you would treat them as a normal “dress shoe” where a regular waxing and proper storage would keep the leather supple. However, the treatment is only as good as the leather so I don’t know if the Ecco shoes can be expected to last very long no matter the care considering the “abuse” they’re put through.

    • Golfraven

      May 14, 2015 at 2:22 pm

      Undortunately those will not last long – years or couple of seasons unlike FJs or maybe previous Adidas models. Speaking from experience

  10. c masty

    May 14, 2015 at 9:55 am

    More sponsor laden pay for play, pay for posts dribble.

    • ron

      May 14, 2015 at 11:45 am

      If that’s the case, whats wrong with that? Still good info here that you can apply to all shoes, not just ECCO. I’m sure WRX have operating costs the need to be paid.

      • Brian

        May 14, 2015 at 2:05 pm

        Truth. At least it’s not a post about cleaning a carburetor on an ’85 Mazda Miata. It’s like product placements on tv shows. Better that than the show gets canceled due to lack of funding. Synergistic cross-enterprise marketing dynamics!

  11. Jonny B

    May 14, 2015 at 9:49 am

    I switched to Ecco golf shoes last year and have to say my feet have never been more comfortable. I wear the Biom Hydromax shoes for 2-3 rounds per week and have started to notice they are wearing after about 6 months of use. Thanks for the care tips. I’ll be sure to take good care of them given the cost… I want them to last at least 2 seasons. But seriously – nothing comes close in terms of comfort and stability. I dread the moment I have to take them off and put my office shoes back on, it’s that big of a difference.

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